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Boston College Graduate Catalog 

1994.1995 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/bostoncollegegra9495bost 



Boston College Bulletin 

Graduate Catalog 
1994-95 



Boston College 
Chestnut Hill 
Massachusetts 02167 
617-552-8000 



BOSTON COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Volume LXIV, Number 7, May, 1994 

The Boston College Bulletin contains current information regarding the 
University calendar, admissions, degree requirements, fees, regulations 
and course offerings. It is not intended to be and should not be relied upon 
as a statement of the University's contractual undertakings. 

Boston College reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes 
of any nature in its program, calendar or academic schedule whenever it 
is deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the 
rescheduling of classes with or without extending the academic term, 
cancelling of scheduled classes and other academic activities, and requir- 
ing or affording alternatives for scheduled classes or other academic ac- 
tivities, in any such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably prac- 
ticable under the circumstances. 

The Boston College Bulletin is published six times a year in April, May, 
August, September; semi-monthly in July. 

Boston College is committed to providing equal opportunity in edu- 
cation and in employment regardless of race, sex, marital or parental sta- 
tus, religion, age, national origin or physical/mental handicap. As an em- 
ployer, Boston College is in compliance with the various laws and regu- 
lations requiring equal opportunity and affirmative action in employment, 
such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and Federal Executive Order 
#11246. Boston College's policy of equal educational opportunity is in 
compliance with the guidelines and requirements of Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Act, Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments Act of 1972, 
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 

USPS— 389— 750 

Second-class postage paid at Boston, 

Massachusetts 02109. 

Postmaster: Send PS Form 3579 to Boston College Registrar's 
Office, Lyons 101, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. 



Front cover photograph by Geoff Why /Monica De Salvo; design by Boston College Of- 
fice of Publications and Print Marketing, and Boston College Office of the University 
Registrar 



2 • Contents 



Contents 



BOSTON COLLEGE 

The University 4 

Accreditation of the University 4 

Academic Resources 4 

Academic Development Center 4 

Audiovisual Facilities 4 

Computing Support, Service and 

Facilities 4 

The Libraries 5 

The Campus 5 

Policy of Non-Discrimination 6 

Confidentiality of Student Records 6 

National Student Loan Clearinghouse ....6 

Enrollment Statistics and Graduation 
Rate 6 

Tuition and Fees 6 

Massachusetts Medical Insurance 6 

Check Cashing 6 

Withdrawals and Refunds 6 

Financial Aid 7 

Student Services 9 

AHANA Student Programs 9 

Athletics 9 

Career Center 9 

Chaplains 9 

Dean for Student Development 9 

Dining Services 9 

Disabled Student Services 9 

Graduate Student Association 9 

Health Services 10 

Immunization 10 

University Counseling Services 10 

Academic Regulations 10 

Academic Integrity 10 

Academic Grievances 10 

Grading 10 

Graduation 10 

Transcript of Record 10 

Student Absences for Religious 

Reasons 10 

Withdrawal from a Course 10 

Withdrawal from Boston College .... 1 1 

Leave of Absence 1 1 

Readmission 1 1 

Special Programs 1 1 

Cross-Registration Program 1 1 

Study Abroad Programs 1 1 

Summer Programs 12 

Course Numbers and Codes 12 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 

General Information 13 

Master's Degree Programs 13 

Special Programs 13 

Doctoral Degree Programs 13 

Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program 14 

Special Students (Non-Degree) 14 

Admission 14 

Academic Regulations 16 

Graduation 16 

Financial Aid 16 

Graduate Programs: 

American Studies 18 

Biology 19 

Center for East Europe, Russia 

and Asia 21 

Chemistry 21 

Classical Studies 23 

Economics 25 

English 27 

Fine Arts 3 1 

Geology and Geophysics 33 

History 36 

Mathematics 42 

Philosophy 44 

Physics 52 

Political Science 54 

Psychology 57 

Institute of Religious Education and 
Pastoral Ministry 60 

Romance Languages and Literatures ....63 

Slavic and Eastern Languages 68 

Sociology 70 

Theology 74 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Faculty 80 

Policies and Procedures 81 

Doctoral Degree Programs 82 

Master's Degree Programs 83 

Academic Regulations 84 

Programs in Counseling, Developmental 
Psychology and Research Methods 85 



Programs in Curriculum, Administration 
and Special Education 87 

Course Offerings 91 

LAW SCHOOL 

Pre-Legal Studies 101 

Admission Requirements 101 

Information 102 

Faculty 102 

THE WALLACE E. CARROLL GRADUATE 
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT 

Master in Business Administration 
Program 103 

Accreditation 103 

Master of Science in Finance 103 

Ph.D. in Management with a 
Concentration in Finance 103 

Ph.D. in Management with a 

Concentration in Organization 

Studies 103 

Joint Degree Programs 103 

Semester Study Abroad 104 

Special Study 104 

Teaching Methods 104 

M.B.A. Program Options 104 

M.B.A. Core Curriculum 104 

M.B.A. Elective Offerings and 
Concentrations 105 

Career Services 106 

Admission Information 106 

Tuition and Expenses 107 

Financial Assistance 107 

Academic Policies 107 

Department Faculty listings 108 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Faculty 1 10 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Program 
with a major in Nursing 1 1 1 

Program of Study Ill 

Master of Science Degree Program 

with a major in Nursing 1 12 

General Information 1 14 

Course Offerings 1 14 



Contents • 3 



Preceptor and Resource Personnel 

Appointments for Graduate 

Programs 1 19 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Professional Program: Master's 

Level 120 

Joint Degree Programs 121 

Professional Program: Doctoral 

Level 121 

Continuing Education 122 

Faculty 122 

SUMMER SESSION 123 

CAMPUS MAPS 124 

ADMINISTRATION 1 25 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 127 

DIRECTORY AND OFFICE 

LOCATIONS 1 28 



4 • TtaE University • Accreditation of the University 



The University 

Having been granted its charter in 1863 by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts Boston College is one of the old- 
est Jesuit-founded universities in the United States. 

During its first fifty years the College was located in the City of Bos- 
ton. Shortly before World War I, property was acquired in Chest- 
nut Hill and the college was relocated to this suburban community 
six miles west of Boston. 

During the more than fifty years since its relocation the growth 
of Boston College into today's University was particularly evident 
during the 1920's. The Summer Session, the Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences, the Law School, and the Evening College were added 
in rapid succession to the original College of Arts and Sciences. In 
1927 the College of Liberal Arts at Lenox and the Schools of Phi- 
losophy and Theology at Weston were established as academic units 
of the University. The Graduate School of Social Work was estab- 
lished in 1936, and the College of Business Administration in 1938. 
The College of Business Administration and its Graduate School, 
which was established in 1957, is now known as the Wallace E. Carroll 
School of Management. The Schools of Nursing and Education were 
founded, respectively, in 1947 and 1952. 



otfcXs^ 



ACCREDITATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Boston College is a member of, or accredited by, 
the following educational institutions: The 
American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the 
American Association of Colleges for Teacher 
Education, the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business, the American Association of 
University Women, the American Bar Associa- 
tion, the American Chemical Society, the Ameri- 
can Council on Education, the American Psycho- 
logical Association, the Association of American 
Colleges, the Association of American Law 
Schools, the Association for Continuing Higher 
Education, the Association of Urban Universities, 
the Board of Regents of the University of New 
York, the College Entrance Examination Board, 
the Council of Graduate Schools, the Council on 
Social Work Education, the Association of Jesuit 
Colleges and Universities, the Institute of Euro- 
pean Studies, the Institute of Asian Studies, the 
International Association of Universities, the In- 
ternational Association of Catholic Universities, 
the Interstate Certification Compact, the Na- 
tional Catholic Education Association, the Na- 
tional League for Nursing, the New England As- 
sociation of Schools and Colleges, the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Sigma Nu, and other simi- 
lar organizations. 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES 

Academic Development Center 

The Academic Development Center (ADC) is 
designed to support and enhance all aspects of 
academic excellence in this community of schol- 
ars by helping undergraduates, graduate students, 
and faculty improve learning quality and teach- 
ing effectiveness. The ADC, which opened its 
doors in September 1991, is located on the sec- 
ond floor of O'Neill Library, in the Eileen M. and 
John M. Connors Learning Center. 

The Academic Development Center is a com- 
prehensive, inclusive resource serving all Boston 
College students at no charge. To address the 
needs of the great majority of BC students, the 
Center provides tutoring for more than 60 
courses — in mathematics, physical and life sci- 
ences, management, social work, nursing, social 
sciences, history, philosophy, and in classical and 
foreign languages. The ADC also offers occa- 
sional workshops in study skills and learning strat- 
egies. In addition, graduate tutors in English help 
students strengthen their academic writing skills. 
These services are available throughout the regu- 
lar academic year and during summer school. All 
ADC' tutors have been recommended by their rel- 
evant academic departments; most are graduate 
students or outstanding upper-division students. 



The ADC offers programs designed to chal- 
lenge the most academically talented, highest 
achieving students, as well as programs designed 
to support those who are least prepared and most 
academically challenged. One member of ADC's 
full-time professional staff provides academic sup- 
port services for students with learning disabiU- 
ties, helping to ensure their success at Boston 
College. 

Working closely with the Graduate School of 
Arts and Sciences, the ADC sponsors seminars, 
workshops, and discussions for graduate teaching 
assistants (TAs) and teaching fellows (TFs) on 
strategies for improving teaching effectiveness 
and student learning. Each fall, the ADC and 
GSA&S hold a two-day workshop to help TAs 
and TFs prepare for teaching. The Center also 
provides individual videotaping and consultation 
upon request. 

The ADC provides similar instructional sup- 
port services to BC faculty. Through these and 
other related activities, the Academic Develop- 
ment Center plays an increasingly important role 
in enhancing the quality of academic life at Bos- 
ton College. Call 61 7-552-8055 for further infor- 
mation. 

Audiovisual Facilities 

University Audiovisual Services provide the 
academic programs, with a broad range of instruc- 
tional media and materials support services. These 
include access to over thirty types of classroom 
AV/TV equipment. Also available are audio pro- 
duction services, film and video rentals, television 
recording and editing, graphics production and 
photographic production. Several courses are 
taught in AVs television studio. Students make 
major use of modern post-production editing 
equipment for their TV projects. 

Language Laboratory, serving all the lan- 
guage departments and English for Foreign Stu- 
dents, is located in Lyons 3 13. In addition to the 
70 state-of-the-art listening/recording stations 
and dual-teacher console, the facility includes 
video and film viewing rooms and three audio-in- 
terfaced microcomputers. The Lab's audio and 
videotape collection, computer software and other 
audio-visual learning aids directly support and/or 
supplement the curriculum requirements in for- 
eign language, literature and music. The Lan- 
guage Laboratory Director and student lab assis- 
tants are available during the day and evening to 
assist students (undergraduate and graduate) and 
faculty in the operation of equipment and selec- 
tion of appropriate materials for their course-re- 
lated or personal language needs. 

Computing Support, Service and 
Facilities 

The O'Neill Computing Facility (OCF) is the 
largest public computing facility on campus. It is 
open to anyone with a currently valid Boston 
College identification card. The OCF has more 
than 1 50 workstations available, providing access 
to a wide variety of hardware, software and pe- 
ripherals. 

The OCF has software for most academic 
courses, as well as the word processing, spread- 
sheet, statistical analysis, programming languages, 
graphics production and database management 
software supported at Boston College for each 



The University • The Campus • 5 



type of computer. Many professors allow elec- 
tronic filing of class assignments or provide elec- 
tronic information for students in folders that are 
accessible on a central file server. Paper output is 
available from laser printers. 

Workstations can access EagleNet, Boston 
College's campus-wide information network that 
links the IBM mainframe, VAX cluster, UNIX 
workstations and more than 2,000 desktop com- 
puters on campus. EagleNet provides access to an 
ever-increasing variety of services, including: 
course registration, grades, academic and finan- 
cial aid information, electronic mail (e-mail), 
QUEST (Boston College's electronic Library 
catalog), indexes to periodicals, and electronic 
services of other affiliated libraries. 

The Boston College InfoEagle is a rapidly ex- 
panding electronic source of campus information, 
with on-line listings of campus events, phone 
numbers, want ads, research discussions and other 
information. The EagleNet is connected to the 
Internet, a world-wide computer network offer- 
ing users a wide variety of interesting resources 
and research tools. Electronic mail accounts are 
available for students with authorization from 
their academic departments. 

The OCF is staffed with professionals and stu- 
dents who provide assistance with all aspects of 
computing. Training tutorials and software docu- 
mentation are available for use within the facil- 
ity. 

More specialized assistance is provided by the 
Help Center in Gasson Hall. It is open Monday 
through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on a 
walk-in, phone-in or electronic mail (e-mail) 
basis. The Help Center phone number is 
552-HELP, or e-mail to: 
Help_Center@bcvms.bc.edu. 

The OCF and the Help Center are part of 
Boston College's Information Processing Support 
department, which is also staffed by consultants 
providing advanced computing and networking 
support. 

The Libraries 

The Boston College Libraries offer a wealth of 
resources and services to support the teaching and 
research activities of the University. The book 
collections exceed 1.3 million volumes, and ap- 
proximately 1 5,000 serial titles are currently re- 
ceived. 

Membership in two academic consortia, the 
Boston Library Consortium and the Boston 
Theological Institute, adds still greater dimen- 
sions to the resources of the Boston College Li- 
braries, providing Boston College faculty and 
graduate students who have special research needs 
access to the millions of volumes and other ser- 
vices of the member institutions. 

Through membership in New England Li- 
brary Information Network (NELINET), there 
is on-line access to publishing, cataloging and 
interlibrary loan location from the OCLC, Inc. 
data base, which contains over twenty-eight mil- 
lion records from the Library of Congress and 
from more than 17,000 contributing institutions 
worldwide. 

Boston College was among the first schools in 
the country to offer an on-line public computer 
catalog of its collections. The Libraries' Quest 



computer system provides instant access to infor- 
mation on library holdings, as well as supporting 
book circulation and acquisitions' procedures. 
Students may browse the catalog using video dis- 
play terminals in all the libraries, and faculty may 
access the catalog from their houses or offices. In 
addition, the libraries offer computer searching 
of hundreds of commercial data bases in the hu- 
manities, sciences, business, and social sciences 
through an in-house CD-ROM network, through 
access to outside databases, and through the Quest 
library system. 

Information on use of the libraries is con- 
tained in the Guide to the Boston College Libraries 
and other brochures available in the libraries. 

The Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Library, the 
central library of Boston College, opened its doors 
to the public in September 1984. This facility 
contains the research collection in the humani- 
ties, social sciences, education, business, nursing, 
and the sciences. There are over one million book 
volumes, 9,500 active serials, 1,487,000 micro- 
forms and 140,000 government documents, as 
well as a growing audio-visual collection. The 
O'Neill Library is a leader in the utilization of 
technology in library services. The Library's Elec- 
tronic Information Center offers state-of-the-art 
computer systems to assist students and faculty in 
locating library materials both locally and nation- 
ally. 

The Resource Center, located in the base- 
ment of the Newton Chapel, provides study space 
for the residents of the Newton Campus as well 
as 4 Macintosh workstations that may be reserved 
for use by students, undergraduates having first 
priority. 

The School of Social Work Library, 
McGuinn Hall, contains a collection of over 
33,000 volumes, 350 serials, government docu- 
ments, social work theses, doctoral dissertations, 
and videotapes. The collection covers the history 
and philosophy of social work, its methodology, 
and all aspects of social welfare services. The 
Library's collections and services support the 
master's and doctoral programs offered at the 
Chestnut Hill campus, and master's programs 
offered at four off-campus sites throughout Mas- 
sachusetts and Maine. 

The Law School Library, located on the 
Newton Campus, is a well-rounded collection of 
legal and related materials in excess of 200,000 
volumes. The open stack collection includes pri- 
mary source materials consisting of reports of de- 
cisions and statutory materials with a broad-based 
collection of secondary research tools in the form 
of textbooks and treatises, legal and related peri- 
odicals, legal encyclopedias and reference works. 
Primarily Anglo-American in character, the col- 
lection also contains growing numbers of inter- 
national and comparative law works. The Library 
is also a subscriber to LEXIS and to WESTLAW 
and has an in-house network of CD-ROM data- 
bases. 

The Bapst Library, a beautiful collegiate 
Gothic building that served as the main library for 
over 50 years, has been restored to its original 
splendor and now houses the Libraries' collec- 
tions in art as well as a circulating collection of 
novels, poetry, drama, biography, short stories, 
essays and nonfiction. Approximately five hun- 



dred seats are available as study space including a 
Graduate Study Area. 

The Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Office is located 
on the fourth level of Bapst Library. The office 
houses furnishings and memorabilia from former 
Speaker of the House O'Neill's Capitol Office in 
Washington, D.C. Visitors are welcome from 
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. weekdays, or by special 
arrangement. 

The John J. Burns Library of Rare Books 
and Special Collections, located in the Bapst Li- 
brary, north entrance, contains the University's 
special collections, including the University's 
Archives. The distinguished and varied collections 
of the Honorable John J. Burns Library speak elo- 
quently of the University's commitment to the 
preservation and dissemination of human knowl- 
edge. The Burns Library is home to nearly one 
hundred thousand volumes, more than three mil- 
lion manuscripts, and important collections of ar- 
chitectural records, maps, art works, photographs, 
films, artifacts, and ephemerals. These materials 
are housed in the climate-controlled secure en- 
vironment of Burns Library either because of 
their rarity or because of their importance as part 
of a special collection. While treated with special 
care, these resources are available for use at Burns 
to all qualified students, faculty, and researchers. 
Indeed, their use is strongly encouraged, and visi- 
tors to Burns are always welcome, either simply 
to browse or to make use of the collections. 

Though its collections cover virtually the en- 
tire spectrum of human knowledge, the Burns Li- 
brary has achieved international recognition in 
several specific areas of research, most notably in 
Irish studies, British Catholic authors, Jesuitana, 
fine print, Catholic liturgy and life in America, 
1925-75, Boston history, Caribbeana, and Con- 
gressional archives. It has also won acclaim for sig- 
nificant holdings on nursing, detective fiction, 
Thomas Merton, Japanese prints, Colonial and 
early Republic Protestantism, and banking. 

The Geophysics Library, located at Weston 
Observatory, contains a specialized collection of 
over 8,000 monographs and journals on earth 
sciences, particularly seismology. 

The Educational Resource Center, located 
in Campion Hall, serves the School of Education's 
faculty and students. The collection includes 
children's books, curriculum and instructional 
materials, educational and psychological tests, and 
educationally-oriented information technology. 

THE CAMPUS 

Located on the border between the city of Bos- 
ton and the suburb of Newton, Boston College 
derives benefits from its proximity to a large met- 
ropolitan city and its setting in a residential sub- 
urb. Often cited as a model of university planning, 
the campus is spread over more than 200 acres of 
tree-covered Chestnut Hill. Yet it is just a few 
miles from culturally and socially rich Boston. 
The Chestnut Hill campus is tri-level. Dormito- 
ries are on the upper campus; classroom, labora- 
tory, administrative and student service facilities 
are on the middle campus; and the lower campus 
includes the Robsham Theater, the Conte Forum, 
modular and apartment residences as well as rec- 
reational and parking facilities. 



6 • The Universttv • Policy of Non-Discrimination' 



The Newton campus is situated one and one- 
half miles from the Chestnut Hill campus. The 
Law School is located on this easily accessible 40- 
acre tract that also contains undergraduate class- 
rooms, dormitories, athletic areas and student 
service facilities. 

POLICY OF NON-DISCRIMINATION 

Boston College is an academic community whose 
doors are open to all students without regard to 
race, religion, age, sex, marital or parental status, 
national origin, veteran status, or disability. The 
Director of Affirmative Action has been desig- 
nated to coordinate the College's efforts to com- 
ply with and carry out its responsibilities to pre- 
vent discrimination in accordance with state and 
federal laws. Any applicant for admission or em- 
ployment, as well as any student, member of the 
faculty and all employees are welcome to raise 
questions regarding violation of this policy with 
Barbara Marshall, Office of Affirmative Action, 
More Hall 315, x2947. In addition, any person 
who believes that an act of discrimination based 
upon sex has occurred at Boston College, may 
raise those issues with the Assistant Secretary for 
Civil Rights of the United States Department of 
Education. 

Boston College has designated the Director 
of Affirmative Action as the person responsible for 
coordinating its efforts to comply with Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (prohibit- 
ing discrimination against individuals with dis- 
abilities in employment) and Title IX of the Edu- 
cation Amendments of 1 972 prohibiting discrimi- 
nation on the basis of sex. 

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT 
RECORDS 

As a matter of necessity, Boston College continu- 
ously records a large number of specific items 
relating to its students. This information is nec- 
essary to support its educational programs as well 
as to administer housing, athletics and extracur- 
ricular programs. The University also maintains 
certain records such as employment, financial and 
accounting information for its own use and to 
comply with state and federal regulations. Boston 
College has committed itself to protect the pri- 
vacy rights of its students and to maintain the 
confidentiality of its records. In addition, the 
College endorses and complies with the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the 
Buckley Amendment), a federal statute that re- 
quires that students be permitted to review 
records in their files and offers them the possibil- 
ity of correcting errors that they may discover. 
Students or others seeking complete information 
regarding their specific rights and the responsi- 
bilities of the University will find copies of the 
family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 
1 974 and the rules and regulations for compliance 
with the Act on file in the University Library or 
in the Office of University Policies and Proce- 
dures in More Hall. 

Certain personally identifiable information 
from a student's education record, designated by 
Boston College as directory information, may be 
released without the student's prior consent. This 
information includes name, term and home ad- 



dress, telephone number, date and place of birth, 
photograph, major field of study, participation in 
officially recognized activities and sports, weight 
and height of members of athletic teams, dates of 
attendance, degrees and awards received, the most 
recent previous educational agency or institution 
attended, and other similar information. Unless 
advised to the contrary, the College will release 
student telephone numbers and verify only all 
other directory information. A student who so 
wishes has the absolute right to prevent release of 
this information. In order to do so, the student 
must complete a form requesting nondisclosure 
of directory information, which is available in the 
Registrar's Office. All non-directory information 
is considered confidential and will not be released 
to outside inquiries without the express written 
consent of the student. 

NATIONAL STUDENT LOAN 
CLEARINGHOUSE 

Boston College is pleased to announce a new part- 
nership with the National Student Loan Clear- 
inghouse. Beginning with the 1994-1995 aca- 
demic year, the National Student Loan Clearing- 
house will be responsible for the processing of 
Student Loan Deferment forms for the following 
loans: Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford, 
SLS, and PLUS. 

Since the National Student Loan Clearing- 
house is Boston College's legally designated 
agent, Boston College is precluded from complet- 
ing any deferment forms for the above mentioned 
loans. 

ENROLLMENT STATISTICS AND 
GRADUATION RATE 

During the fall of 1993 Boston College 
enrolled 8,807 Undergraduate Day students, 
1,336 Evening College students and 4,297 Gradu- 
ate students. Of the Undergraduate Day students 
who enrolled at Boston College in the fall of 1 987, 
87% completed their Bachelor's Degree by the 
summer of 1993. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Please see tuition and fee chart on page 7. 

All tuition and fees are due in full at the time 
of registration in the Graduate Schools of Arts and 
Sciences, Education, Nursing and Social Work. 
For the Graduate School of Management, tuition 
is due September 15, 1994, for fall semester and 
January 15,1 995, for spring semester. The tuition 
in the Law School is due semi-annually by August 
15, 1994, and by December 15, 1994. 

There is a $100.00 late payment fee for pay- 
ments received after the due dates listed above. 
In severe cases, Graduate School of Management 
and Law students whose accounts are not resolved 
by the due dates may be withdrawn from the 
University. 

MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL INSURANCE 

Massachusetts State Law has mandated that all 
students taking at least 75 percent of full-time 
credit hours must be covered by medical insur- 
ance providing a specified minimum coverage. 
Graduate students in the Schools of Social Work 



and Management who register for 9 or more cred- 
its are considered 75 percent of full-time. Stu- 
dents in Graduate Arts and Sciences who regis- 
ter for 6 or more credits and students in the 
Graduate Schools of Nursing and Education who 
register for 7 or more credits are considered 75 
percent of full-time. Boston College will offer 
these students the option of participating in the 
plan offered at the University or submitting a 
waiver form. The waiver must include specific in- 
surance information on the comparable insurance 
plan covering the student. Waivers will be mailed 
to all students and are available upon request at 
the Student Account Office. The waiver must be 
returned by October 14, 1994, for the fall semes- 
ter and by February 14, 1995, for spring semes- 
ter. Students who do not submit a waiver by the 
due dates will automatically be enrolled in the BC 
plan and charged by the University for the re- 
quired Massachusetts Medical Insurance. 

Students registering for less than 75 percent 
of a full-time course load who wish to enroll in 
the insurance plan must be in a degree-granting 
program. Such students enroll directly with the 
insurance company using the part time enroll- 
ment form available at the Boston College Health 
Services department in Cushing Hall or at Walter 
W. Sussenguth and Associates. The coverage be- 
comes effective upon receipt of the application 
and payment by the insurer. 

CHECK CASHING 

Students presenting a valid Boston College ID 
may cash checks ($50 limit) at the Cashier's Of- 
fice, More Hall, Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.- 
4:00 p.m. There is a 50c service charge. Returned 
checks will be fined in the following manner: 

• First three checks returned: $15.00 per check 

• All additional checks: $25.00 per check 

• Any check in excess of $2,000.00: $50.00 per 
check 

• Check cashing privileges are revoked after the 
third returned check. 

WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

Fees are not refundable. 

Graduate tuition is cancelled subject to the 
following conditions: 

• Notice of withdrawal must be made in writing 
to the University Registrar, Boston College, 
Lyons 101, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167. 

• The date of receipt of written notice of with- 
drawal by the University Registrar determines the 
amount of tuition cancelled. 

• The cancellation schedule that follows will ap- 
ply to students withdrawing voluntarily, as well 
as to students who are dismissed from the Uni- 
versity for academic or disciplinary reasons. 

Refund Schedule (Excluding Law) 

Graduate students (except Law students) with- 
drawing by the following dates will receive the tu- 
ition refund indicated below. 

First Semester 

by Sept. 9, 1994: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Sept. 16, 1994: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Sept. 23, 1994: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Sept. 30, 1994: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Oct. 7, 1994: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 



The University • Financial Aid • 7 



Second Semester 

by Jan. 20, 1995: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Jan. 27, 1995: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Feb. 3, 1995: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Feb. 10, 1995: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Feb. 17, 1995: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 

No cancellations are made after the 5th week 
of classes. 

Refund Schedule for Law Students 

Law students who withdraw by September 2, 

1994, for the first semester, and by January 13, 

1995, for the second semester, will have 100 % 
of their tuition charges cancelled. Beginning with 
the 80% cancellation, Law students are subject to 
the refund schedule outlined above. 

If a student does not wish to leave any result- 
ing credit balance on his or her account for sub- 
sequent use, he or she should request, in writing 
or in person, that the Student Account Office 
issue a refund. 

Federal regulations establish procedural 
guidelines applicable to the treatment of refunds 
whenever the student has been the recipient of 
financial assistance through any program autho- 
rized under Title rV of the Higher Education Act 
of 1965. These guidelines pertain to the Federal 
Perkins, the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, 
the Federal College Work-Study, and the Fed- 
eral Stafford Loan. In such cases, the regulations 
require that a portion of any refund be returned 
to the Title IV Program. Further, if a student 
withdraws, the institution must determine if any 
cash disbursement of Title IV funds, made di- 
rectly to the student by the institution for non- 
instructional purposes, is an overpayment that 
must be repaid to the Title IV program. Univer- 
sity policy developed to comply with the regula- 
tions at Boston College will be available upon 
request from the Financial Aid Office. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Boston College offers a variety of assistance pro- 
grams to help students finance their education. 
Graduate students may apply for financial assis- 
tance from both the University Financial Aid 
Office and the academic department to which 
they are applying. 

The Financial Ad Office administers federal 
financial aid programs that include Federal 
Stafford Loans (formerly Guaranteed Student 
Loan), Federal Perkins Loans, and Federal Col- 
lege Work-Study. Students who wish to be con- 
sidered for financial aid from one or more of these 
sources, must complete and file the following 
documents: 

• The Boston College Graduate Financial Aid 
Application 

• The Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA) or the Renewal Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid 

• A signed copy of student's most recent federal 
tax return 

• Financial Aid Transcripts from prior schools. 
The above forms generally become available in 
the Financial Ad Office (Lyons 120) each Decem- 
ber for the following academic year. Students 
must apply for financial aid each year. See the 



TUITION AND FEES FOR 1994-95 ACADEMIC YEAR 



TUITION 

Graduate Schools of Arts and Sciences, Education, and Nursing ** 

Tuition per semester hour $502.00 

Auditor's feet — per semester hour 251 .00 

Carroll School of Management, Graduate Division** 

Tuition per semester hour 574.00 

Auditor's feet — per semester hour 287.00 

Graduate School of Social Work** 

Tuition 14,930.00 

Tuition per semester hour, M.S.W 404.00 

Tuition per semester hour, D.S.W 464.00 

Lav/ School** 

Tuition 18,940.00 

**Students cross-registering in graduate programs pay tuition rates of the school in which they are enrolled. 
t Audits are considered fees and are not refundable. Students changing from credit to audit receive no refund. 

GRADUATE GENERAL FEES* 

• Acceptance Deposit 

Graduate Education 100.00 

Grad SOM— part-time 200.00 

Grad SOM— full-time 400.00 

LawSchoolt 200.00 

Social Work — preliminary A 200.00 

"("Initial deposit due by April 15 with an additional $400.00 due by June 1 . 
A Within two weeks of acceptance; an additional $200.00 due by July 15. 

• Activity fee — per semester 

7 credits or more per semester 23.00 

Fewer than 7 credits per semester 1 3.00 

• Application fee (non-refundable) 

Grad A&S, Education, Social Work 40.00 

Grad SOM 45.00 

Law School 50.00 

• Certificates, Transcripts 2.00 

• Doctoral Comprehensive fee (per semester for GA&S, GSON & GSOE) 530.00 

• Doctoral Comprehensive fee (per semester for GSOM, GSSW) 28.00 

• Continuation fee (per semester— Ph.D. or D.Ed. Cand. for GA&S, GSON and GSOE) 517.00 

• Continuation fee (per semester for GSOM) 589.00 

• Continuation fee (per semester for GSSW) 479.00 

• Master's Thesis Direction 517.00 

•Master's Interim Study 28.00 

• Laboratory fee (per semester) 40.00-205.00 

• Late Payment fee 100.00 

•Late Registration fee 45.00 

•Mass. Medical Insurance (per year) 455.00 

(190.00 first semester; 265.00 second semester) 

• Microfilm and Binding 

Doctoral thesis 90.00 

Master's thesis 70.00 

Copyright fee (optional) 35.00 

•Nursing Laboratory fee 150.00 

• Readmission fee 40.00 

• Registration fee (per semester, non-refundable) 15.00 

• Student Identification Card 15.00 

*Fees are proposed and subject to change. 

tStudents who register for courses totaling fewer than 6 credits per semester and who are in off<ampus 
satellite programs or out-of-state teaching practica are exempt from the activity fee. 

The Trustees of Boston College reserve the right to change the tuition rates and to make additional charges 
within the University whenever such action is deemed necessary. 

Boston College Graduate Financial Aid Applica- for more information about departmental 
tion for proper filing dates and deadlines. financial aid. 

Students may also apply for financial aid Need is defined as the difference between the 

through their academic departments. See the total education-related expenses of attending Bos- 
Graduate Arts and Sciences section of this Catalog ton College and the calculated ability of the stu- 
dent to contribute toward these expenses. 



8 • The University • Financial Aid 



FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS 



UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS AND ACADEMIC GRANTS 

• Eligible: Graduate students enrolled in a degree program. 

• Funding source: Boston College funds; awarded by department. 

• Description: See Financial Aid "Academic Grants," in the Graduate Arts and Science sections of 
this Catalog. 

FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN* (FORMERLY NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOAN) 

• Eligible: Graduate students enrolled at least half-time in a degree program. 

• Funding source: Federal funds and collections from previous borrowers; awarded by the Boston 
College Financial Aid Office. 

• Description: Interest free while in school. Repayment at 5% begins nine months after leaving school. 

FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN (FORMERLY GUARANTEED STUDENT LOAN)* 

• Eligible: Students enrolled on at least a half-time basis. 

• Funding source: Commercial lenders (banks, credit unions, savings & loan associations). Applied 
for through the Boston College Financial Aid Office. 

• Description: A federally guaranteed loan program that is interest-free while the student is in school. 
Students may borrow up to $8,500 per year depending on eligibility. Repayment begins six months 
after leaving school. Contact the Financial Aid Office for interest rate information. 

FEDERAL COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM (CWSP)* 

• Eligible: Students enrolled at least half-time in a degree program. 

• Funding source: Federally-funded; awarded by the Boston College Financial Aid Office. 

• Description: An employment program that provides on and off campus employment opportunities. 
Both summer and academic year jobs are available to qualifying students. 

FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN (SUBSIDIZED AND UNSUBSIDIZED) 

• Eligible: Students enrolled on at least a half-time basis. 

• Description: A federally guaranteed loan program. Students may be eligible to borrow up to 
$ 1 8,500 in a combination of subsidized and unsubsidized loans. The subsidized portion of the loan 
cannot exceed $8,500. Repayment begins 6 months after leaving school. Contact the financial aid 
office for interest rate information. 

GRADUATE EDUCATION LOAN 

• Eligible: Students enrolled at least half-time in a degree program. 

• Funding source: Boston College and Massachusetts Educational Financing Authority. 

• Description: Up to 100% of total educational cost. Principal and interest can be deferred. You must 
have good credit to receive this loan, and a coapplicant is required. 

ALTERNATIVE FINANCING PROGRAMS 

• Eligible: Students and their families. 

• Funding source: Commercial lenders (banks, credit unions, savings & loan associations). 

• Description: There are a number of alternative financing programs available. You must have good 
credit in order to receive these loans. Students and their families should contact the Boston College 
Financial Aid Office for additional information. 

*Complete Boston College Financial Aid Application required. 
**Half time equals at least 6 credits per semester. 



Students with the greatest financial need are given 
preference for most financial aid programs, and 
thus they tend to receive larger financial aid 
awards. The University's estimate of a student's 
financial need is based on an analysis of the infor- 
mation supplied on the FAFSA, the Boston Col- 
lege Ciraduate Financial Aid Application, and the 
tax return. A financial aid award or package will 
combine funds from various sources of assistance. 
These sources may include institutional, federal 
or state funds and can be in the form of grant, loan 
or work. Students are expected to comply with all 
regulations governing the program(s) from which 
they receive assistance. 

Several assumptions are made in determining 
a student's financial aid award. The student is pri- 
marily responsible for paying college expenses. All 



students are expected to borrow a Federal Stafford 
Loan to the maximum eligibility as determined 
by the Financial Aid Office. Students are also ex- 
pected to work on a limited basis (10-20 hours per 
week) during the academic year. Additionally, it 
is assumed that each student will work during the 
summer months and save toward educational ex- 
penses. 

All financial resources are limited. Boston 
College utilizes these limited resources in such a 
way that the greatest number of students will ben- 
efit. Therefore, total financial assistance received 
by a student cannot exceed total need. In the event 
that a student receives other, "outside" assistance 
after Boston College has awarded aid, the student 
is required to report this assistance to the Finan- 
cial Aid Office, and the University may be re- 



quired to adjust the offered aid. It is Boston 
College's policy that the student will receive pri- 
mary benefit from any outside award. Thus, an 
outside award will be used first to reduce unmet 
financial need, and second to reduce the self-help 
component (loan or work) of a financial aid award. 

It is the responsibility of students to know and 
comply with all requirements and regulations of 
the financial aid programs in which they partici- 
pate. Financial aid awards may be reduced or can- 
celled if the requirements of an award program 
are not met. Students receiving a Federal Perkins 
Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan) 
are expected to accept responsibility for the prom- 
issory note and all other agreements that they are 
required to sign. Students must comply with all 
Federal College Work-Study dates and deadlines. 
A student's work-study award will be cancelled if 
he or she has failed to secure a job and return the 
completed Hire Form by October 1. 

All financial aid awards are made under the as- 
sumption that the student's status (full-time, half- 
time) has not changed. Any change in the 
student's status must be reported to the Financial 
Aid Office, as it can affect the financial aid award. 
In addition, all financial aid applicants must main- 
tain satisfactory progress in their course of study. 
Satisfactory academic progress is defined by the 
dean of each school at Boston College. If a stu- 
dent is not maintaining satisfactory academic 
progress, the student should consult with his or 
her dean to determine what steps must be taken 
to re-establish his or her status and eligibility to 
receive financial aid. 

To find specific information on the various 
programs, conditions and procedures, and the 
financial aid deadline dates, please refer to the 
Boston College Graduate Financial Aid Applica- 
tion, the Boston College Financial Aid Award 
Letter, and the Financial Aid Instruction Book- 
let. Students are expected to be familiar with the 
contents of these publications as well as all other 
materials or documents that may be distributed 
by the Boston College Financial Aid Office. 

Financial aid recipients have the right to ap- 
peal their financial aid award. Before making an 
appeal, however, the student should understand 
that Boston College has already awarded the best 
financial aid package possible based on the infor- 
mation supplied. Therefore, any appeal made 
should be based on new information not already 
included in the student's original application 
material. An appeal should be made by letter to 
the student's financial aid counselor. 

When applying for financial aid, the student 
has the right to ask: 

• what the cost of attendance is, and the school 
policy on refunds for students who withdraw. 

• what financial assistance is available, including 
information on all federal, state, local, private and 
institutional financial aid programs. 

• what the procedures and deadlines are for sub- 
mitting applications for each available financial 
aid program. 

• what criteria the institution uses to select 
financial aid recipients. 

• how the institution determines financial need. 
This process includes how costs for tuition and 
fees, room and board, travel, books and supplies, 
personal and miscellaneous expenses, etc., are 



The University • Student Services • 9 



considered in the student's budget. It also includes 
what resources (such as parental contribution, 
other financial aid, student assets, etc.) are con- 
sidered in the calculation of need. 

• how much of the student's financial need, as 
determined by the institution, has been met. 

Students also have the right to request an ex- 
planation of the amount and type of aid in their 
financial aid award package. Students receiving 
loans have the right to know what the interest rate 
is, the total amount that must be repaid, the length 
of time given to repay the loan, when repayment 
must begin, and any cancellation and deferment 
provisions that apply. Students, offered a work- 
study job, have the right to know what kind of job 
it is, what hours are expected, what the duties will 
be, what the rate of pay will be, and how and when 
they will be paid. 

A student also has the responsibility to: 

• pay special attention to his or her application 
for student financial aid, complete it accurately, 
and submit it on time to the right place. Errors 
can delay the receipt of the financial aid package. 

• provide all addidonal documentation, verifica- 
tion, corrections, and/or information requested 
by either the Financial Aid Office or the agency 
to which the application was submitted. 

• read and understand all forms he or she is asked 
to sign, and keep copies of them. 

• perform in a satisfactory manner the work that 
is agreed upon in accepting a Federal College 
Work-Study job. 

• know and comply with the deadlines for appli- 
cations or reapplications for financial aid. 

• notify the lender of a loan (i.e., Federal Stafford 
Loan) of any changes in name, address or school 
status. 

STUDENT SERVICES 

AHANA Student Programs 

(African-American, Hispanic, Asian and Native 
American) 

The goal of this office is to promote the opti- 
mal academic achievement of AHANA students 
at Boston College especially those identified as 
being at an academic disadvantage. The services 
available include the following: tutorial assistance, 
academic advisement, individual and group coun- 
seling, tracking of academic performance, and ca- 
reer counseling. In addition to these services, the 
office assists AHANA student organizations in 
developing and implementing cultural programs. 

Athletics 

The objective of the Boston College Athletic 
Association is to provide members of the entire 
University community with the opportunity to 
participate in, at the involvement level of one's 
choice, a program of physical activity that comple- 
ments their spiritual, academic, cultural and so- 
cial growth. 

To meet the needs of a diverse community, 
the Athletic Association offers activities at five lev- 
els: unstructured recreation, instruction, orga- 
nized intramural sports, club sports and 
intercollegiate competition in 33 varsity sports for 
men and women. 



Career Center 

The Career Center provides comprehensive re- 
sources and information concerning all aspects of 
career planning and job hunting. Its services are 
available to graduate and undergraduate students 
in all schools and concentrations, as well as to 
alumni. 

The Center's Career Resource Library con- 
tains books, files, and videotapes, as well as an 
easy-to-use computerized career guidance system 
that provides interest and skills assessment, as well 
as descriptive information about more than 400 
careers. 

The Career Information Network, composed 
of more than 1,800 alumni volunteers who host 
students in their workplaces, provides an oppor- 
tunity to hear on-the-job realities from a variety 
of career fields. 

Students wishing to integrate course work 
with practical work experience can participate in 
the Boston College Internship Program, located 
in the basement of the Center. 

For the job hunter, the Career Center pro- 
vides group and individual assistance in resume 
writing, interview preparation, and job hunting 
strategies, an on-campus recruiting program, cur- 
rent job listings and a credentials service. 

Graduate students are encouraged to visit the 
Career Center at 38 Commonwealth Avenue, 
where they can pick up the Center's monthly 
publications. The Career Center is open on Mon- 
day evenings until 7:30 p.m. during the academic 
year for the convenience of graduate students and 
alumni. 

Chaplains 

The Chaplains Office strives to deepen the faith 
of Boston College students by offering opportu- 
nities to discover, grow in, express and celebrate 
the religious dimensions of their lives in person- 
ally relevant ways. In addition, it works to foster 
justice by developing social awareness and to build 
a sense of community as a Christian value in the 
whole University. Offices are located in McElroy 
Commons, Room 215, x3475. 

Dean for Student Development 

The Office of the Dean for Student Development 
coordinates the planning, implementation and 
evaluation of programs and services promoting 
student development. This includes overseeing 
student clubs and organizations, programming, 
the Graduate Student Association, alcohol and 
drug education, off-campus and commuting stu- 
dent affairs, and international student services. 
The Dean and assistants are also responsible for 
coordinating policies and procedures concerning 
student conduct and discipline, and the judicial 
process. 

Dining Services 

The University offers a varied and nutritionally 
balanced menu in five dining areas: McElroy 
Commons, Eagles Nest and Lyons Hall on 
Middle Campus, Stuart Hall on Newton Campus, 
and a new facility on Lower Campus. In addition 
students can use their Meal Plan in The Club, the 
Cafe, and the concessions at Conte Forum. 

The Meal Plan is mandatory for resident stu- 
dents living in Upper Campus, Newton Campus, 
Walsh Hall, 66 Comm. Ave., 70 and 90 St. Tho- 
mas More Road and Greycliff dormitories. The 



cost of the full Meal Plan for 1 994-95 is Si ,565.00 
per semester or S3, 130.00 per year. 

Optional meal plans are available to all other 
students living in on/off campus apartments, and 
to commuters. A one hundred dollar minimum 
deposit is required. 

Further information can be obtained by con- 
tacting the University Meal Plan Office, 617-552- 
3533 orx3533, Lyons Hall IB. A dietician is avail- 
able to those students with special dietary needs 
or restrictions, by calling 61 7-552-3 1 78 or x3 1 78. 

Disabled Student Services 

Disabled students applying to Boston College are 
strongly encouraged to make their disability 
known voluntarily to the Admissions Office of the 
School to which they are applying. This informa- 
tion will not affect the decision on admission; 
rather, it will give the University the opportunity 
to offer specific assistance and support through 
programs and services provided by different de- 
partments on campus. 

For more information regarding services for 
students with physical disabilities contact John 
Hennessy, Coordinator of Services for Physically 
Challenged Students, Gasson Hall 108, 617-552- 
3310. For more information regarding services for 
students with learning disabilities contact Dr. 
Kathleen Duggan, Coordinator of Academic Sup- 
port Services for Learning Disabled Students, 
Academic Development Center, O'Neill Library, 
617-552-8055. 

Graduate Student Association 

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) of Bos- 
ton College is an autonomous organization that 
serves students in the Graduate Schools of Arts 
and Sciences, Education, Nursing, Social Work, 
and the Carroll Graduate School of Management. 
Currently, approximately 4,000 full and part-time 
and special students are enrolled in these pro- 
grams. 

The GSA exists to provide academic support 
to students in the form of conference grants and 
special group funding, to host social, cultural and 
academic programs for graduates, and to inform 
the graduate community of matters of interest to 
them. The GSA also advocates for graduate stu- 
dent interests within the University community. 
The GSA nominates graduate students to serve 
on a variety of committees, including the Univer- 
sity Academic Council, the University Commit- 
tee on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, the Graduate 
Educational Policy Committee and the new stu- 
dent center committee. 

The GSA is funded by the activities fee 
charged to every graduate student at registration 
and is governed by the GSA Student Council, 
composed of student representation from each 
academic department. The council and staff work 
together to strengthen the collective voice of 
graduate students. The GSA publishes a monthly 
newsletter, called The Bulletin, which is mailed 
home to all graduate students. It also publishes an 
annual Graduate Students Achievement Profile, 
listing all graduate students who have published 
or presented papers, won awards or otherwise 
been acknowledged for their work. 

The GSA has its offices in Hovey House, lo- 
cated at 258 Hammond Street across Beacon 
Street from McElroy Hall. A Graduate Student 



10 • Ti if. University • Academic Rf.gulations 



Lounge, with a pool table, television and dart 
board, is also there. All graduate students are 
welcome to attend the GSA's weekly luncheon 
meetings held from 1 1 :45 a.m. to 1 :00 p.m. every 
Thursday that classes are in session. The GSA's 
telephone numbers are 617-552-8706, 617-552- 
3504 and 617-552-4583. 

Health Services 

The primary goal of University Health Services 
is to provide confidential medical/nursing care 
and educational programs to safeguard the physi- 
cal well-being and mental health of the student 
body. The Department has two units: a Clinic 
located in Cushing Hall on the Chestnut Hill 
Campus, and a 20-bed Infirmary located in Keyes 
House South on the Newton Campus. Emer- 
gency service is also provided. 

Graduate students may receive on-campus 
medical care by signing up at the University 
Health Services Office in Cushing Hall, Room 
119. The Health/Infirmary Fee will then be 
charged to their account. 

The services include a walk-in clinic as well 
as medical, surgical, gynecological, orthopedic, 
nutrition, wart, physical therapy, allergy and im- 
munization clinics. The In-Patient Infirmary is 
open 24 hours a day when school is in session. 

The Health/Infirmary Fee for medical care on 
campus is not a substitute for a health insurance 
policy. Massachusetts law requires that all univer- 
sity students registered for 75 percent of a full- 
time course load be covered by an Accident and 
Sickness Insurance Policy so that protection may 
be assured in case of hospitalization or other costly 
outside medical services. (See Tuition and Fees 
section) Insurance information is available at 
University Health Services Office, Cushing Hall, 
Room 119. 

Immunization 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Law requires 
all full-time graduate students born after 1956 to 
show evidence of satisfactory immunization 
against measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, and 
diphtheria. Students who fail to provide adequate 
documentation of immunization will not be per- 
mitted to register and attend classes. The only 
exceptions permitted are when immunizations 
conflict with personal religious belief or when a 
physician documents that immunizations should 
not be given due to pre-existing medical prob- 
lems. 

University Counseling Services (UCS) 

UCS provides counseling and psychological ser- 
vices to the students of Boston College. The goal 
of UCS is to enable students to develop fully and 
to make the most of their educational experience. 
Services available include individual counseling 
and psychotherapy, group counseling, consulta- 
tion, evaluation and referral. Students wishing to 
make an appointment may contact a counselor in 
any one of the Counseling Offices on campus 
(Gasson 108, 552-3310; Campion 301, 552-4210; 
Service Bldg. T100, 552-3927). 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Note: In addition to being familiar with the Aca- 
demic Regulations listed below, students are ex- 
pected to know the Academic Regulations of their 
school as printed on subsequent pages of this 



Catalog, or in the appropriate individual school's 
bulletin. 

Academic Integrity 

Students at Boston College are expected to have 
high standards of integrity. Any student who 
cheats or plagiarizes on examinations or assign- 
ments is subject to dismissal from the College. 
Cases involving academic integrity shall be re- 
ferred to a Dean for adjudication or for judgment 
by an Administrative Board, as the student shall 
request. 

Academic Grievances 

Any student who believes he or she has been 
treated unfairly in academic matters should con- 
sult with the Chairperson of the Graduate Pro- 
gram or the Dean to discuss the situation and/or 
to obtain information about relevant grievance 
procedures. 

Grading 

In each graduate course in which he or she regis- 
ters for graduate credit, the student will receive 
one of the following grades at the end of the se- 
mester: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C, or F. In addition, stu- 
dents in the Law School may receive grades of 
C+, C-, and D. The high passing grade of A is 
awarded for course work that is distinguished. 
The ordinary passing grade of B is awarded for 
course work that is clearly satisfactory at the 
graduate level. The low, passing grade of C is 
awarded for work that is minimally acceptable at 
the graduate level. The failing grade of F is 
awarded for work that is unsatisfactory. For Law 
School students, the grades of C- and D may be 
awarded for work that is passing but unsatisfac- 
tory. 

Academic credit is granted for courses in 
which a student receives a grade of A, A-, B+, B, 
B-, or C. No academic credit is granted for a 
course in which a student receives a grade of F. 
Note: Students should consult the Academic 
Regulations section of their own school, or the 
appropriate Bulletin, for academic standards that 
apply to their individual degree programs. A Pass/ 
Fail option is available for a limited number of 
courses, as stipulated by the School. Field Instruc- 
tion in the Graduate School of Social Work, for 
example, is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. 

Incompletes and Deferred Grades 

All required work in any course must be com- 
pleted by the date set for the course examination. 
A student who has not completed the research or 
written work for a course, may, with adequate 
reason and at the discretion of the faculty mem- 
ber, receive an I (Incomplete). Except for extraor- 
dinary cases, the grade of I for any course shall 
not stand for more than 4 months. In extraordi- 
nary cases, the student may petition the appropri- 
ate Dean for an exception. The Graduate School 
of Social Work requires that any faculty member 
asked, and agreeing, to extend an Incomplete for 
more than 30 days after the original exam/paper 
deadline, submit a designated explanatory form to 
the office of the Dean. A Graduate School of 
Social Work student who fails to remove an I 
within the 30 days, or to secure die extension form 
from the respective faculty member, will receive 
an F for the course. A Law School student who 
fails to remove an Incomplete for any course prior 
to graduation will receive an F for the course. 



Any Incomplete grade that is turned in to the 
Registrar's Office will remain an Incomplete un- 
til it is changed by formal action of the faculty 
member involved. 

A J grade is recorded when the grade is 
deferred. 

Graduation 

The University awards degrees in May, Septem- 
ber and December of each year, although com- 
mencement ceremonies are held only in May. 
Students who have completed all requirements for 
the degree before a specific graduation date are 
eligible to receive the degree as of that date. 

In order to ensure timely clearance students 
should sign up for graduation in the Registrar's 
Office by the deadline published in the Academic 
Calendar. University policy states that degree 
candidates must be registered in the semester in 
which they graduate. 

Transcript of Record 

A record of each student's academic work is pre- 
pared and maintained permanently by the Office 
of the University Registrar. For students in the 
Law School and the Graduate Schools of Man- 
agement and Social Work, the transcript includes 
the final cumulative average; no cumulative aver- 
age is presently maintained for students in Gradu- 
ate Arts and Sciences. 

Transcript requests must be submitted in 
writing to: Transcript Requests, Office of the 
Registrar, Lyons Hall 101, Boston College, 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. 

Usually requests are processed within 72 
hours of receipt. If rush service is required, a flat 
$5.00 "same day fee" will be assessed in addition 
to the cost of each transcript ($2.00 per copy). 
University policy prohibits the issuance of partial 
transcripts. 

Transcript/Diploma Holds 

Diplomas will not be issued, nor transcript re- 
quests honored, for any student with an outstand- 
ing financial obligation to the University. The 
same policy applies to any student who does not 
complete the required loan exit interview. 

Student Absences for Religious 
Reasons 

Any student who is unable, because of his/her re- 
ligious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate 
in any examination, study, or work requirement 
on a particular day shall be excused from any such 
examination, or study or work requirement, and 
shall be provided with an opportunity to make up 
such examination, study or work requirement that 
may have been missed because of such absence on 
any particular day. However, such makeup exami- 
nation or work shall not create an unreasonable 
burden upon the University. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

Students who withdraw from a course after the 
registration period but before the last three weeks 
of class will have a W recorded in the grade col- 
umn of their permanent record. Students will not 
be permitted to drop courses during the last three 
weeks of classes or during the exam period. Stu- 
dents who are still registered at this point will 
receive a final grade for the semester. 



The Uniivf-RSI'iy • Spf.cial Programs • 1 1 



Withdrawal from Boston College 

Students who wish to withdraw from Boston 
College in good standing are required to file a 
Withdrawal Form in the University Registrar's 
Office. In the case of students who are dismissed 
for academic or disciplinary reasons, the appro- 
priate college administrator will complete this 
form. 

Leave of Absence 

Degree candidates seeking a leave of absence from 
Boston College are required to complete a Leave 
of Absence Form, available in the University 
Registrar's Office. All degree candidates must 
register each semester until the degree is com- 
pleted. Degree candidates not wishing to regis- 
ter for a given semester must file the Leave of 
Absence Form with the University Registrar. 

To assure re-enrollment for a particular se- 
mester following a leave of absence, students must 
notify the University Registrar's Office and the 
Dean's Office of their individual school about 
their intention, at least six weeks in advance of the 
start of that semester. 

Readmission 

Students who desire readmission will initiate the 
process in their respective Dean's offices. Appli- 
cations for readmission should be made, and the 
readmission fee paid, at least six weeks before the 
start of the semester in which the former student 
seeks to resume study. 

The readmission fee will be billed to the stu- 
dents account. 

Note: Students requesting readmission to the 
Graduate School of Social Work must contact the 
Director of Social Work Admissions at least one 
semester before their intended return to insure 
appropriate class and field placement. 

The appropriate Dean's Office will make the 
decision on the readmission application, and the 
Registrar's Office will notify the former student 
about the action taken. The decision will be based 
on consideration of the best interests of both the 
student and the University. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Cross-Registration Program 

The Consortium 

Boston College graduate students may cross-reg- 
ister for graduate courses at Boston University, 
Brandeis University, or Tufts University. Stu- 
dents in the Graduate School of Management 
may not take courses at Brandeis University. Usu- 
ally students cross-register for only one course a 
semester but may, with their advisor's permission, 
cross-register for more than one course. Students 
should be aware that the number of courses for 
which they may register is at the discretion of the 
host institution. Students should pick up the 
Cross-Registration Petition in the Registrar's Of- 
fice, Lyons 101 . Tuition payments for cross-reg- 
istration are made to Boston College. For further 
information please contact the Boston College 
Registrar's Office, 617-552-3300. 

Boston Theological Institute 

Students who want to cross-register through the 
Boston Theological Institute (BTI) should pick 
up a Cross-Registration Petition in the Theology 



Department (Carney 418) and return it with the 
appropriate authorization to the Registrar's Of- 
fice at Boston College. Tuition payments for 
B.T.I, are made to Boston College. 

Study Abroad Programs 

Boston College offers study and research oppor- 
tunities for students in each of the graduate 
schools through programs in England, France, 
Germany, Ireland, Japan, the Netherlands and 
Scotland. 

University of Amsterdam, Netherlands 

The University of Amsterdam, the largest univer- 
sity in the Netherlands, offers liberal arts and 
professional courses, taught in English, that span 
many disciplines. Amsterdam is a very "Euro- 
pean" city where English is widely spoken. 

• Contact: Marian St. Onge, Office of Interna- 
tional Programs. 

TU Dresden, Germany 

Founded in 1828, this "technical" university is 
energetically developing its humanities divisions. 
Dresden Technistat Universitat offers courses in 
Germanic and European studies and a program 
in the sciences. Dresden, the capital of Saxony in 
the former GDR, has a distinguished cultural and 
intellectual history. 

• Contact: Marian St. Onge, Office of Interna- 
tional Programs. 

Cuba/China: Comparative Social Policy 
Analysis (SW 813) 

This three-credit course offers students in the 
Graduate School of Social Work an integrative 
cross-cultural exploration of national social policy 
issues on market and non-market social policy. 
The course includes a field experience of 1 5 days 
in Cuba (Havana, Matanzas, Hibacoa, Santiago, 
and Varadero), or three weeks in the People's 
Republic of China (Shanghai, Beijing, Turpan, 
Kashgar, Urumqui, the Taklamakan Desert, 
Lanzhou, Kunming, Xiang, Dunhuang, 
Chengdu). 

• Contact: Demetrius Iatridis, Graduate School 
of Social Work. 

St. Petersburg: Study/Research Program 

This graduate-level academic program offered by 
the Department of Slavic and Eastern Languages 
is run in cooperation with the Institute of Rus- 
sian Literature of the Russian Academy of Sci- 
ences, Russia's highest institution of literary re- 
search and learning. Through the program, par- 
ticipants live with private families for one or two 
full-semesters in one of the most cultured and 
beautiful Russian cities while attending lectures 
and seminars and pursuing individual research 
work. 

Students pay tuition and program fee to Bos- 
ton College before departure, receive full aca- 
demic credit and a Russian transcript from the 
Russian Academy. 

• Contact: Professor M.J. Connolly, Chairperson, 
Department of Slavic and Eastern Languages. 

Louvain: European Experience-CSOM 
Graduate School 

The Carroll Graduate School of Management 
and the departments of Economics, History and 
Political Science offer a three-week summer pro- 
gram in association with the Irish Institute for 
European Affairs in Louvain (Leuven), Belgium. 



There is a travel component consisting of corpo- 
rate visits in Milan, Italy and Sophia-Antipolis, 
France. 

• Students pay tuition and expenses to Boston 
College prior to departure in May. 

• Contact: Dean Louis Corsini, Carroll Gradu- 
ate School of Management. 

Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan 

Students may attend Sophia University, Tokyo 
for a semester or full year. Courses include Japa- 
nese language and history, and the political, eco- 
nomic and cultural systems of Japan 

• Contact: Marian St. Onge, Office of Interna- 
tional Programs. 

University of Paris-Sorbonne, France 

The program at the University of Paris gives stu- 
dents the opportunity to participate in a course 
of study in French Literature, Culture and Cin- 
ema. 

• Contact: Ourida Mostefai, Romance Languages 
and Literatures. 

University of Strasbourg, France 

This academic year program offers study in Man- 
agement, Political Science, History, and Econom- 
ics. Strasbourg is the site of the European Parlia- 
ment, the council of Europe and the European 
Human Rights Commission. 

• Contact: Marian St. Onge, Office of Interna- 
tional Programs. 

University of Glasgow, Scotland 

Students attending the University of Glasgow, 
one of the oldest universities in Europe, choose 
courses in European Community, Scottish stud- 
ies, business and the sciences. Glasgow, the 
former "Second City of the British Empire," was 
named "cultural center of Europe" in 1990. 

• Contact: Marian St. Onge, Office of Interna- 
tional Programs. 

London: Law School Spring Semester 
Abroad 

The semester in London is designed to strengthen 
the curriculum of the Boston College Law School 
in the field of Comparative Law. The academic 
program consists of classes at King's College, 
London, and of externships modeled on the clini- 
cal program currently offered at Boston College 
Law School. 

• Contact: Professor Cynthia Lichtenstein, Bos- 
ton College Law School. 

Madrid: ICADE Business School of the 
University of Comillas in Madrid 

The Carroll School of Management maintains an 
international student exchange program with the 
ICADE Business School of the University of 
Comillas, in Madrid, Spain. M.B.A. students se- 
lected to participate in the program spend the fall 
semester of their second year at the Madrid cam- 
pus. They may also spend the preceding summer 
in Spain in an intensive language instruction pro- 
gram. 

• Contact: Dean Louis Corsini, Carroll Gradu- 
ate School of Management. 

Paris: Ecole Normale Superieure 

The Department of Romance Languages and 
Literatures maintains a one-year exchange pro- 
gram with the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris. 
A graduate student in French goes to Paris and a 



12 • University • Course Numbers and Codes 



student from the Ecole Normale comes to Bos- 
ton. The student from Boston College serves as 
an assistant at a high school in the greater Pari- 
sian area and may audit at no cost any courses 
given at the ENS. The student from the ENS 
serves as a part-time lecturer at Boston College, 
teaching a minimum of five courses over two se- 
mesters, and may also audit any Boston College 
course with the permission of the professor. 

• Contact: Professor Ourida Mostefai, Romance 
Languages and Literatures. 

Summer Programs 

Boston/Strasbourg Internship Exchange 

This program allows students to gain business 
experience in an internship in Strasbourg, France. 

• Contact: Marian St. Onge, Office of Interna- 
tional Programs. 

Boston/Hangzhou Internship Exchange 

This internship includes a work placement in a 
Sino-Foreign joint venture in the Shanghai/ 
Hangzhou area. 

• Contact: Marian St. Onge, Office of Interna- 
tional Programs. 

COURSE NUMBERS AND CODES 

The alphabetic prefix of each course indicates the 
department or program offering the course. 
(F: 3) or (S: 3) — Designates a 3 -credit course that 
will be offered either in the fall or in the spring. 
(F, S: 3) — Designates one course that will be of- 
fered in the fall and in the spring, but may be taken 
only once for 3 credits. 

(F: 3-S: 3) — Designates a two-semester course 
that can be taken both semesters for a total of 6 
credits. 

Courses with no semester designation will not 
be offered in 1994-95 but are taught on a regular 
basis by the department. 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • General Information • 13 



Graduate School of Arts 
and s ciences 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences offers programs of study 
leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Master of 
Arts (M.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), and a Certificate of Advanced 
Graduate Studies (C.A.G.S.) in English. The Graduate School also 
may admit as Special Students those not seeking a degree who are 
interested in pursuing course work for personal enrichment. 



exfcXs^J 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The Graduate Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 
221 is open from 8:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, to assist persons making prelimi- 
nary inquiries. Application materials for U.S. citi- 
zens or for those who have official permanent U.S. 
resident status are included in the Graduate 
School Bulletin. The Bulletin may be obtained ei- 
ther from the department in which students hope 
to study or from the Graduate Admissions Office. 
All non-U. S. citizens should obtain their appli- 
cation materials from the Graduate Admissions 
Office as additional documents are required of 
them and additional information is provided for 
them. 

The Schedule of Courses and Registration Infor- 
mation for Graduate Students booklets are pub- 
lished by the University Registrar prior to each 
semester's registration period. The International 
Student Office, the Office of the Dean for Stu- 
dent Development, and the Graduate Student 
Association Office provide non-academic services 
for students. 

MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Requirements for Degrees of Master 
of Arts and Master of Science 

Acceptance 

Candidates for the Master's degree must gener- 
ally be graduates of an accredited college with 1 8 
semester hours of upper division work in the pro- 
posed area of study. In case of deficiencies, pre- 
requisites may be earned in the Graduate School 
by achieving a minimum grade of B in courses 
approved for this purpose. Where there is some 
doubt about a scholastic record, acceptance may 
be conditional. The candidate will then be evalu- 
ated by the department and recommended to the 
Dean for approval after the first semester of 
course work or after earning a minimum of 6 cred- 
its. 

Course Credits 

A minimum of 30 graduate credits is required for 
each Master's degree. No formal minor is re- 
quired, but, with the approval of his or her major 
department, a student may take a limited number 
of credits in a closely related area. No more than 
6 graduate credits will be accepted in transfer to- 
ward fulfillment of course requirements, as de- 
scribed more fully under "Transfer of Credit." 



Language Requirement 

The extent and nature of the language require- 
ments are the responsibility of the department 
concerned. Consult the section for each depart- 
ment for language requirements. 

Master's Comprehensive Examination 

The candidate for a Master's degree must pass a 
departmental comprehensive examination that 
may be oral, written, or both, as determined by 
the department. Each candidate should consult 
his or her major department to learn the time and 
nature of the comprehensive examination. Reg- 
istration for comprehensives will take place di- 
rectly with the individual departments. Questions 
on the nature and exact date of examinations 
should be directed to the department chairperson 
or Graduate Program Director. The following 
grading scale is used: pass with distinction (PwD), 
pass (P), and fail (F). Generally, within two weeks, 
notification of examination results will be sent in 
writing to the Registrar's Office and the individual 
student. A candidate who fails the Master's Com- 
prehensive Examination may take it only one 
more time. Students who have completed their 
course work should register for Master's Interim 
Study (888) each semester until they complete 
their comprehensive examinations. Only the reg- 
istration fee and the activity fee are charged dur- 
ing this period. No credit is granted. 

Thesis 

Some programs require or allow the option of a 
thesis. It is the responsibility of the student to be- 
come familiar with the regulations of his or her 
major department. A maximum of 6 credit hours, 
attained by registering for Thesis Seminar 801, 
is required for the thesis. The thesis is done un- 
der the supervision of a director and at least one 
other reader assigned by the department. Students 
who have completed 6 credits under Thesis Semi- 
nar but who have not finished their thesis must 
register for Thesis Direction 802, a non-credit 
course, each semester until the thesis is com- 
pleted. A Graduation Form should be filed with 
the Registrar in accordance with the dates indi- 
cated in the academic calendar. Two typed cop- 
ies of the thesis, one original and one clear copy, 
approved and signed by the director and reader, 
must be submitted to the Graduate School Office, 
accompanied by the proper binding and micro- 
film fee, no later than the date specified in the 
academic calendar. 



The submitted thesis becomes the property of 
Boston College but the University does not limit 
the author's right to publish results. 

Time Limit 

The student is permitted^e consecutive years from 
the date of acceptance into the program for 
completion of all requirements for the Master's 
degree. Extensions are permitted only with ap- 
proval of the department concerned and of the 
Dean. 

Leave of Absence 

Students enrolled in a degree program who do not 
register for course work, Thesis Direction or for 
Master's Interim Study in any given semester 
must request a leave of absence for that semester. 
Leaves of absence are not normally granted for 
more than 2 semesters at a time. Students may 
obtain the Leave of Absence Form from the Reg- 
istrar and submit this form to that office for the 
Dean's approval. 

Leave time will normally be considered a por- 
tion of the total time limit for the degree unless 
the contrary is decided upon initially between the 
student and the Dean. Students must file the 
Readmission Form with the Registrar's Office and 
pay the readmission fee at least 6 weeks prior to 
the semester in which they expect to re-enroll. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

• Master of Arts in American Studies: See depart- 
ments of History, English, and Political Science. 

• Master of Arts in Biblical Studies: See depart- 
ment of Theology. 

• Master of Arts in Irish Studies: See department 
of English. 

• Master of Arts in Medieval Studies: See depart- 
ment of History. 

• Master of Arts in Slavic Studies: See department 
of Slavic and Eastern Languages. 

• Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies 
(C.A.G.S.): See department of English. 

The five-year time limit for completing a 
Master's Degree also applies to the C.A.E.S. and 
C.A.G.S. programs. 

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy 

The Ph.D. degree is granted only for distinction 
attained in a special field of concentration and 
demonstrated ability to modify or enlarge a sig- 
nificant subject in a dissertation based upon origi- 
nal research conspicuous for its scholarship. 

The minimum requirement for the Ph.D. is 
that the doctoral student follow a unified and or- 
ganized program of study. Additional information 
regarding specific programs of study at the doc- 
toral level will be found in this Catalog under 
departmental listings. Detailed statements of re- 
quirements and procedures should be requested 
directly from the department in which the student 
has an interest. 

Residence 

The philosophy of the residence requirement is 
that a doctoral student should experience the to- 
tal environment of the University. Residence for 
at least two consecutive semesters of one academic 
year, during which the student is registered as a 



14 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program 



full-time student at the University, is required. A 
plan of studies that meets this requirement must 
be arranged by the student with the department. 
Registration in two courses per semester is con- 
sidered to fulfill the residency requirement for 
students holding full-year fellowships and assis- 
tantships. The residence requirement may not be 
satisfied, in whole or in part, by summer session 
attendance. 

Language Requirement 

Each department shall decide the extent and na- 
ture of the language requirement for its students. 

Preparing for Comprehensives 

Students frequently spend one or two semesters 
preparing for comprehensive examinations fol- 
lowing the completion of their course require- 
ments. During this interim, students should reg- 
ister for Doctoral Comprehensives 998. No credit 
is granted. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Student eligibility for taking the doctoral compre- 
hensive examination is determined by the depart- 
ment. Students should consult with their depart- 
ment about the nature of this examination and 
time of administration. Departments use the fol- 
lowing grading scale: pass with distinction (PwD), 
pass (P), and fail (F); one of these three grades will 
be recorded on the student's transcript. Gener- 
ally, within two weeks, the department will send 
the results in writing to the Registrar's Office and 
to the individual student. A student who fails the 
doctoral comprehensive examination may take it 
once again not sooner than the following semes- 
ter and at a time designated by the department. 
In case of a second failure, no further attempt is 
allowed. 

Admission to Candidacy 

A student attains the status of a doctoral candidate 
by passing the doctoral comprehensive examina- 
tion and by satisfying all departmental require- 
ments except the dissertation. Doctoral candi- 
dates are required to register each semester and 
to pay a doctoral continuation fee until comple- 
tion of the dissertation. 

Dissertation 

Each doctoral candidate is required to complete 
a dissertation that embodies original and indepen- 
dent research and that demonstrates advanced 
scholarly achievement. The subject of the disser- 
tation must be approved by the major department 
and the research performed under the direction 
of a faculty advisor. The manuscript must be pre- 
pared according to style requirements of the de- 
partments, and of the Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Acceptance of the Dissertation 

As soon as possible after a student's admission to 
candidacy, a dissertation committee will be ap- 
pointed by the Dean to judge the substantial merit 
of the dissertation. The dissertation committee 
shall include the major faculty advisor as chair- 
person and at least two additional members of the 
graduate faculty as readers. 

The dissertation shall be defended by the can- 
didate in a public oral examination. 

Official approval of the dissertation by the dis- 
sertation committee is required. Committee 



members certify their acceptance by signing the 
title page of the dissertation. Two signed copies 
of the dissertation, one original and one clear 
copy, should be filed in the Graduate School of 
Arts and Sciences Office. The submitted disser- 
tation becomes the property of Boston College, 
but the University does not limit the author's 
right to publish the results. 

Dissertation Publication 

Doctoral candidates should report to the Gradu- 
ate School Office by the middle of the semester 
in which they plan to graduate for detailed in- 
structions concerning dissertation publication 
requirements and commencement procedures. 

Time Limit 

All requirements for the Doctoral degree must be 
completed within eight consecutive years from the 
beginning of doctoral studies. Extensions beyond 
this limit may be made only with departmental 
recommendation and the approval of the Dean. 

Leaves of Absence 

The conditions for leaves of absence and 
readmission as noted for the Master's Program are 
also applicable to the Doctoral Program. Leaves 
of absence for students on Doctoral Continuation 
are rarely granted. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY DOCTORAL 
PROGRAM 

Where departmental doctoral programs are un- 
able to satisfy the interests of the student, an in- 
terdisciplinary doctoral program remains a pos- 
sibility. A student interested in exploring such a 
possibility should first make an inquiry to the 
Graduate School Office. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS (NON-DEGREE) 

Students not seeking a degree, but who are inter- 
ested in pursuing course work at the graduate 
level, may apply for admission as special students. 
Many individuals enter a department of the 
Graduate School as special students-either to 
explore the seriousness of their interest in study- 
ing for an advanced degree or to strengthen their 
credentials for possible later application for de- 
gree study. Others are simply interested in tak- 
ing graduate course work for interest's sake or for 
other purposes. Admission as a special student 
does not guarantee subsequent admission for de- 
gree candidacy. Individuals who are admitted as 
special students and who subsequently wish to 
apply for admission as degree candidates must file 
additional application documents and be accepted 
for degree study. The number of credits one has 
earned as a special student that may be applied 
toward the requirements of a degree is deter- 
mined by the appropriate Department in concert 
with Graduate School regulations. 

Those admitted as Special Students may take 
courses only in the Department that has recom- 
mended their admission. Permission to continue 
to take courses as a Special Student beyond the 
semester for which admission was originally 
gained must be obtained from the admitting 
Department's Graduate Program Director. 
While required, gaining such permission is not 
considered to be the same as an original 



application for admission; consequently, a second 
application fee is not required. 

ADMISSION 

Eligibility and Application Information 

The Boston College Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences is an academic community whose doors 
are open to all students without regard to race, re- 
ligion, age, sex, marital or parental status, national 
origin or handicap. Opportunities and experi- 
ences are offered to all students on an equal basis 
and in such a way as to recognize and appreciate 
their individual and cultural differences. 

Applicants for admission to the Graduate 
School ordinarily must possess at least a bachelor's 
degree from an accredited institution and give evi- 
dence of the ability and preparation necessary for 
the satisfactory pursuit of graduate studies. This 
evidence consists primarily, but not exclusively, 
in the distribution of undergraduate courses and 
the grades received in them. Consult the appro- 
priate departmental descriptions for additional 
specific requirements. 

Individuals lacking a bachelor's degree gen- 
erally are not admitted to Graduate School 
classes. In order to attend graduate classes, per- 
sons lacking the bachelor's degree should apply 
for authorization either through the Dean of the 
Evening College of Arts and Sciences and Busi- 
ness Administration or, in the case of Boston 
College undergraduates, through their appropri- 
ate dean and with the approval of the chairper- 
son of the given department. Such students will 
receive only undergraduate credit for the course 
taken in the Graduate School, and the course 
credit will be entered only on their undergradu- 
ate record. For regulations governing the simul- 
taneous Master's/Bachelor's degree, one should 
consult his or her own undergraduate dean. 

The Graduate School accepts two classes of 
applicants: Degree students (degree-seeking) and 
Special students (non-degree-seeking). 

A completed application to the Graduate 
School includes forms that provide biographical 
information, official transcripts, and references. 
All of these documents will be found in the Gradu- 
ate School of Arts and Sciences Bulletin, along with 
complete instructions for their submission. For 
possible additional required credentials, e.g., 
GRE scores, etc., consult the requirements of the 
Department to which admission is being sought. 
All application materials should be sent to the Gradu- 
ate Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 221. 

Applicants for Special Student status should 
consult the Graduate Arts and Sciences Bulletin re- 
garding required application documents. All ap- 
plication materials should be sent to the Graduate 
School Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 221. 

Degree and Special students are not admitted 
officially until the completed Application Form 
with a positive Department recommendation has 
been approved by the Director of Graduate Ad- 
missions. Admission should not be presumed 
without receipt of official notification from the 
Director. 

Degree-seeking applicants should consult the 
department of specialization regarding the spe- 
cific requirements for the various departmental 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Admission • 15 



Master's, C.A.E.S., C.A.G.S., and doctoral pro- 
grams. 

For the necessary Application Forms and in- 
formation, Domestic Students (U.S. citizens and 
permanent resident non-U. S. citizens) should ad- 
dress their requests to the department of interest 
or to the Graduate Admissions Office. 

Foreign Students (non-U.S. citizens who are 
not permanent U.S. residents) should address 
their requests to the Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences, Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 22 1 . 

If one's department of interest has require- 
ments involving the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion (GRE), information regarding these tests 
may be obtained from The Center for the Study 
of Testing, Evaluation and Educational Policy, 
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 
02167. 

Information on the GRE tests also may be ob- 
tained from the Educational Testing Service, Box 
955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 or Educational 
Testing Service, 1947 Center Street, Berkeley, 
California 94794. 

All documents submitted by applicants for ad- 
mission become the property of the Graduate 
School and are not returnable. Applicants who are 
accepted by the Graduate School but do not reg- 
ister for course work at the indicated time will 
have their documents kept on file for twelve 
months after the date of submission. After that 
time, the documents will be destroyed and the ap- 
plicants must provide new ones if they later de- 
cide to begin graduate study. 

Procedure for Filing Applications 

Domestic Students (U.S. citizens and other 
permanent residents of U.S.) 

Domestic students applying for admission and 
financial aid should submit all application mate- 
rials to the Graduate Admissions Office, 
McGuinn Hall 221. 

Unless other dates are indicated by individual 
departments, the completed applications for ad- 
mission should be on file by April 1 5 for June ad- 
missions, May 1 5 for September admissions and 
November 15 for January admissions. Earlier 
application is strongly encouraged from those 
hoping to receive Departmental financial aid. 

Applicants are urged to use the Application 
Acknowledgment post card included in the 
Graduate School Bulletin to ensure the complete- 
ness of their application and to contact the depart- 
ment in which they plan to study or the Gradu- 
ate School Admissions Office if they require ad- 
ditional information. 

Foreign Students (Non-U.S. citizens who are 
not permanent residents of U.S.) 

Foreign students seeking admission should write 
to the Boston College Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences requesting the International Student 
Application Forms. 

Foreign students should send all their com- 
pleted application materials to Graduate School 
of Arts and Sciences, Graduate Admissions Office, 
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 
02167, USA. 

They should not send these materials directly 
to the department or program concerned since 
this will only delay the processing of their appli- 
cations. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL PROGRAMS AND DEGREES 

DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 



M.A.T. M.S. 



American Studies 




/ 








Biology 


/ 






/ 


/ 


Chemistry 


/ 






/ 


/ 


Classical Lang. 




/ 








Economics 


/ 


/ 








English 


/ 


/ 


/ 




/ 


Geology/Geophysics 








/ 


/ 


History 


/ 


/ 


/ 






Linguistics 




/ 








Mathematics 




/ 






/ 


Pastoral Ministry 




/ 








Philosophy 


/ 


/ 








Physics 


/ 






/ 


/ 


Political Science 


/ 


/ 








Psychology 


/ 










Romance Lanauaaes 


/ 


/ 


/ 






Russian 




/ 








Slavic Studies 




/ 








Sociology 


/ 


/ 








Theology 


/ 


/ 








Irish Studies (English) 




/ 








Biblical Studies (Theology) 




/ 








Medieval Studies (History) 


/ 


/ 








Medieval Studies (Romance 


Languages) 


/ 









All foreign student applicants for whom En- 
glish is not the first language should plan to take 
the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage) Examination, and indicate that their score 
be forwarded to the Graduate School by the Edu- 
cational Testing Service. Ordinarily, a minimum 
score of 550 on this examination is expected by 
the Graduate School for admission. Individual 
departments may require a higher score. Informa- 
tion about this examination can be obtained from 
the Educational Testing Service (see above for 
address). 

Applications for admission that do not involve 
a request for financial aid should be received in 
the Graduate School Office by April 1 5 for Sep- 
tember admission and by October 1 for January 
admission. 

Applications for admission that do involve a 
request for financial aid should be received in the 
Graduate School Office by February 1 5. No re- 
quests for financial aid will be considered for Janu- 
ary admissions. 

Acceptance 

Announcements of acceptance or rejection are 
usually mailed on or about April 1 5 for Septem- 
ber admissions but may vary by department. De- 
cisions for January or June admission are made on 
a rolling basis. Decisions are made on the basis 



of departmental recommendations and the fulfill- 
ment of prerequisites. No student should presume 
admission until he or she has been notified offi- 
cially of acceptance by the Director of Admissions 
of the Graduate School. 

Registration 

Students in the Graduate School of Arts and Sci- 
ences register for courses by mail. New and con- 
tinuing degree students will be mailed registra- 
tion material, including the Registration Informa- 
tion for Graduate Students booklet, approximately 
one month prior to the beginning of each semes- 
ter. Consult the calendar at the back of this cata- 
log for registration dates and deadlines for the 
1994-95 academic year. 

Before registration, all degree students should 
see their department advisor or chairperson to dis- 
cuss a program of study and obtain approval for 
courses. See the Registration Information for Gradu- 
ate Students book for information on acceptable 
methods of payment. 

Students will receive a confirmation as soon 
as the registration has been processed. For infor- 
mation on graduate tuition and fees refer to the 
"Graduate Tuition and Fees" section of this Cata- 
log. In addition to the tuition cost, students must 
pay the registration fee and student activities fee 
each semester. 

After registration, neither additional courses 
nor changes from audit to credit are permitted. 



16 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Academic Regulations 



Students may withdraw from a course or change 
from credit to audit up to three weeks prior to ex- 
aminations and may receive a partial tuition re- 
fund on withdrawals submitted during the three 
weeks following registration. Students changing 
from credit to audit receive no refund. See "With- 
drawals and Refunds" section for specific refund 
dates. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Academic Integrity 

Students in the Boston College Graduate School 
of Arts and Sciences are expected to have high 
standards of integrity. Any student who cheats or 
plagiarizes on examinations or assignments is sub- 
ject to dismissal from the Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences. Cases involving academic integrity 
shall be referred to the Dean for adjudication. 

Grades 

In each graduate course in which he or she regis- 
ters for graduate credit, the student will receive 
one of the following grades at the end of the se- 
mester: A, A- B+, B, B-, C, F, W or I. The high 
passing grade of A is awarded for course work that 
is distinguished. The ordinary passing grade of B 
is awarded for course work that is clearly satisfac- 
tory at the graduate level. The low, passing grade 
of C is awarded for work that is minimally accept- 
able at the graduate level. The failing grade of F 
is awarded for work that is unsatisfactory. 

Academic credit is granted for courses in 
which a student receives a grade of A, A-, B+, B, 
B-, or C. No academic credit is granted for a 
course in which a student receives a grade of F. A 
student who receives a grade of C in more than 
10 or F in more than 8 semester hours of course 
work may be required to withdraw from the 
school. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

To withdraw from a course after registration, a 
graduate student should go to the Office of the 
Associate Dean of the Graduate School. 

For students who officially withdraw from a 
course during the registration period, no record- 
ing entry will appear on the permanent record. 
After the registration period but before the last 
three weeks of class, official withdrawal from a 
course will be recorded by W in the grade column 
of the permanent record. No student will be per- 
mitted to withdraw from a course during the last 
three weeks of classes or during the examination 
period. Students still registered in a course dur- 
ing this period will receive a final grade in the 
course. For specific dates, please refer to the re- 
fund schedule of this Catalog. 

Incompletes 

All required work in any course must be com- 
pleted by the date set for the course examination. 
A student who has not completed the research or 
written work for a course may, with adequate rea- 
son and at the discretion of the faculty member, 
receive an I (Incomplete). Except for extraordi- 
nary cases, the grades of Incomplete(s) shall not 
stand for more than four (4) months. A student's 
financial aid may be jeopardized if he or she has 
Incompletes of more than four months' standing. 
Any Incomplete grade that is turned in to the 
Registrar's Office will remain an Incomplete until 



it is changed by a formal action of the faculty 
member involved. 

Semester Examinations and Grade 
Reports 

Seminars and teacher-training courses may or 
may not have a semester examination at the dis- 
cretion of the instructor. Semester examinations 
are given in all other courses and students should 
consult the semester examination schedule posted 
outside the University Registrar's Office, Lyons 
101. When examinations or classes are canceled 
as a result of stormy weather, an announcement 
is made on the radio (WBZ, WHDH), or by re- 
corded phone message (call 552-INFO), gener- 
ally by noon. The scheduling of examinations 
thus cancelled is posted outside Lyons 101. Se- 
mester grade reports are mailed to all students 
who are in good standing. 

Transfer of Credit 

Students who have completed one full semester 
of graduate work at Boston College may request 
transfer of not more than six graduate credits 
earned elsewhere. Only courses in which a stu- 
dent has received a grade of B or better, and which 
have not been applied to a prior degree, will be 
accepted. Credit received for courses completed 
more than ten years prior to a student's admis- 
sion to his or her current degree program are not 
acceptable for transfer. Transfer of Credit forms, 
which are available in the University Registrar's 
Office, should be submitted, together with an 
official transcript, directly to the student's Chair- 
person and Dean for approval. If approved, the 
transfer course and credit, but not a grade, will 
be recorded on the student's permanent record. 
Graduate students who have been formally 
admitted to the Graduate School and who have 
earned credits in the Boston College Summer 
Session will have their grades automatically trans- 
ferred to their permanent record unless the stu- 
dent requests otherwise. 

GRADUATION 

May Graduation 

Graduate School degrees are awarded at the an- 
nual May commencement. Students who plan to 
graduate in May should file a Graduation Form 
in the Registrar's Office by the deadline stated in 
the Academic Calendar. For students who sign up 
for graduation but who for some reason, do not 
graduate on the anticipated date, the Registrar's 
Office will automatically move them up to the 
next scheduled graduation period. Those who 
finish degree requirements during the school year 
may request a Letter of Certification from their 
Dean's office for the completion of their degree 
requirements. 

Diplomas are distributed immediately follow- 
ing the completion of the commencement exer- 
cises. Diplomas will be mailed to students unable 
to attend commencement. 

The name of a graduate will not appear on the 
official commencement list unless all financial and 
library accounts have been settled, nor will di- 
ploma or transcripts be awarded or issued where 
the fees have not been paid. 



September and December 
Graduations 

Graduate students who have completed all degree 
requirements by September 1 or December 30 are 
eligible to receive the degree as of those dates. 
The procedure is the same as for May graduation. 
Since there are no commencement exercises in 
December or September, the names of those re- 
ceiving degrees will be included in the program 
of the following May commencement. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Academic Awards 

Stipends and scholarships are available to aid 
promising students in the pursuit of their stud- 
ies, including: University Fellowships, Teaching 
Fellowships, Graduate Assistantships, Research 
Assistantships and Tuition Scholarships. Awards 
vary by discipline and can be as large as $12,000 
plus a full tuition scholarship. Individuals whose 
applications are complete will routinely be con- 
sidered for financial aid by the Department in 
which they hope to study; no separate application 
is necessary. The scholastic requirements for ob- 
taining these stipend awards or scholarship awards 
are necessarily more exacting than those for sim- 
ply securing admission to the Graduate School. 

University Fellowships 

University Fellowships are available in some 
departments offering the Ph.D degree. These 
awards, which provide a stipend, and may include 
up to a full tuition scholarship, do not require 
specific services. 

Fellowships for American Minority 
Group Students 

The Graduate School sponsors several Fellow- 
ships specifically for American minority group 
students. These are in addition to other Fellow- 
ship and Assistantship awards, which carried tu- 
ition scholarships and stipends of up to $1 1,500 
for the 1993-94 academic year, and may increase 
slightly for the 1 994-95 academic year. These fel- 
lowships do not require specific services. Inter- 
ested students should write directly to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions and Financial Aid, Attention: 
Minority Student Fellowship Program for further 
particulars. All applicants, of course, are routinely 
considered for the various types of financial aid 
that are available in the Graduate School. 

Teaching Fellowships 

The Graduate School has available a limited num- 
ber of Teaching Fellowships. These provide for 
a stipend that varies among departments. The 
Teaching Fellow, in addition to his or her pro- 
gram of studies, is usually responsible for six hours 
of teaching in the undergraduate colleges. 

Graduate Assistantships 

Assistantships are available in most departments. 
Generally, the Assistants in the natural science de- 
partments assist in laboratory activities. In these 
and other departments the Assistants may be oth- 
erwise involved in the academic activities of the 
department. The nature and number of hours 
involved are determined by the Department 
Chairperson. 

Assistantships provide a stipend that varies 
among departments. 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Financial Aid • 17 



Research Assistantships 

Research Assistantships are available in some de- 
partments. The stipends are similar but not uni- 
form among the departments. Summer research 
opportunities are also available on some research 
projects. For further information, contact the 
Chairperson of the Department. 

Tuition Scholarships 

Tuition scholarships are awarded to a limited 
number of students based on academic achieve- 
ment and promise. 

Procedures for Financial Aid Recipients 

Teaching Fellows and Assistants are full-time 
graduate students. Consequently, they may not 
accept any additional commitment of employ- 
ment without prior consultation with and permis- 
sion of the Chairperson of the department and 
approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

At the opening of each school year, or at what- 
ever other time financial aid may be awarded, re- 
cipients must report to the Graduate Admissions 
Office to fill out personnel cards and tax informa- 
tion forms. 

An aid recipient who relinquishes a Fellow- 
ship, Assistantship or a tuition scholarship must 
report this matter in writing to the Department 
Chairperson and to the Dean. These awards may 
be discontinued at any time during an academic 
year if either the academic performance or in-ser- 
vice assistance is of an unsatisfactory character. 
They may also be discontinued for conduct inju- 
rious to the reputation of the University. 

Other Sources of Financial Aid 

Students interested in other sources of financial 
aid, such as work-study funds and various loan 
programs, should inquire at the University Finan- 
cial Aid Office where all such aid is administered. 
Refer to the earlier section on Financial Aid in this 
Catalog and to the Graduate School Bulletin. 



18 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • American Studies 



Graduate Programs 
American Studies 



FACULTY 

The American Studies Faculty Caucus for 
1994-95: 

Professor Christopher Wilson, (Director), En- 
glish 

Professor Henry Blackwell, English 
Professor Sherri Broder, History 
Professor Andrew Buni, History 
Professor Alexandra Chasin, English 
Professor Anne Fleche, English 
Professor William Gamson, Sociology 
Dean Carol Hurd Green, Arts and Sciences 
Professor Stuart Hecht, Theater 
Professor Jeffrey Howe, Fine Arts 
Professor Robert Kern, English 
Professor Alan Lawson, History 
Professor Seymour Leventman, Sociology 
Professor Ramsey Liem, Psychology 
Professor Suzanne Matson, English 
Professor Karen Miller, History 
Professor Philip O'Leary, English 
Professor Carol Petillo, History 
Professor Richard Schrader, English 
Professor Laura Tanner, English 
Professor Cecil Tate, English 
Professor James Wallace, English 
Professor Reva Wolf, Fine Arts 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

American Studies at Boston College is an inter- 
departmental program leading to the Master of 
Arts degree. Normally, students enter either 
through History or English, but cooperating de- 
partments include Sociology, Political Science, 
Psychology and Fine Arts as well. Admission of 
any applicant will be determined by both the ma- 
jor department and the American Studies Com- 
mittee. 

The Program is designed to encourage an un- 
derstanding of the American experience by bring- 
ing students to an integrated view of American 
culture. Candidates concentrate in a major de- 
partment, while integrating the methods of inter- 
disciplinary work developed in a colloquium in the 
literature and practice of American Studies, and 
two research seminars. In addition to these nine 
credits, the student is required to take twelve 
hours of graduate work in his or her major field, 
and nine in a field related to that major interest. 
At the end of a student's course of study, the 
Master's candidate undergoes an oral examination 



testing his or her ability to synthesize several ar- 
eas of knowledge. 

The Program also has several extracurricular 
dimensions. It has been a focal point for programs 
drawing upon the cultural resources of the Bos- 
ton area. 

Applicants are asked to acquire application 
materials from the department that will be their 
major field of concentration. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Students construct their program from 
Americanist offerings in cooperating depart- 
ments, in addition to the two-course core se- 
quence. 

AS 724 Graduate Core Colloquium: An 
Introduction to the Literature of American 
Studies (F: 3) 

This course will introduce traditional American 
Studies methods and then compare them with 
more recent developments in the field. We will 
go on to consider some recent trends in Cultural 
Studies, focusing particularly on ways of study- 
ing the intersections of race, class, gender, sexu- 
ality, and national identity in concrete local in- 
stances. The course will work largely as an exer- 
cise in comparative methodology, but we will 
also — through readings, films, and independent 
research — treat particular historical moments as 
cases in point. 

Alexandra Chasin, English Department 

AS 990 Graduate Core Seminar Afro-American 
Intellectual Thought (S: 3) 

This course treats the works of selected Afro- 
American (with some exceptions) thinkers and 
scholars on issues concerning race in America 
from the ante-bellum period through the present. 
The purpose is to examine the context(s), prob- 
lem identification, analyses, and proposed strate- 
gies of, as well as responses to the works under 
consideration. By comparing the readings, it may 
be possible to draw tentative conclusions about 
why certain ideas seem to resonate, gain a broad 
following, and then recede in a particular histori- 
cal period only to subsequently re-emerge in a 
somewhat altered form. 

Rather than attempt the impossibility of ex- 
haustive coverage, the combination of readings 
lends itself to the type of structured inquiry de- 
scribed earlier. The identification of race as a prin- 
ciple theme provides continuity over historical 
time, but also allows for discussion of various 
subthemes including caste, class, gender, ethnic 
conflict, and social constructions. 

Karen Miller, History Department 

Interested students may inquire about the Pro- 
gram by writing directly to Prof. Christopher P. 
Wilson, Director, American Studies Program, 
English Department, Boston College, Chestnut 

Hill, MA 02167. 



Biology 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Biology • 19 



FACULTY 

Walter J. Fimian Jr., Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
University of Vermont; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Notre Dame 

Yu-Chen Ting, Professor Emeritus; A. B., National 
Honan University; M.S., University of Kentucky; 
M.S.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University 

Maurice Liss, Professor; A.B., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., Tufts University School of Medicine 

Thomas N. Seyfried, Professor; B.A., St. Francis 
College; M.S., Illinois State University; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois 

Jolane Solomon, Professor; A.B., Hunter College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Radcliffe College 

Anthony T. Annunziato, Associate Professor; B . S . , 
Boston College; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst 

Grant W. Balkema, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

William J. Brunken, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Long Island University; Ph.D., State University 
of New York, Stony Brook 

Mary Kathleen Dunn, Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Kansas; M.A., Michigan State 
University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill 

James J. Gilroy, Associate Professor; B.S., 
University of Scranton; M.S., Catholic University; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

JonathanJ. Goldthwaite, Associate Professor; B.S., 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

Joseph A. Orlando, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Merrimack College; M.S., North Carolina State 
College; Ph.D., University ofCalifornia, Berkeley 

William H. Petri, Associate Professor; Chairperson 
of the Department; A.B., Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

Donald J. Plocke, S.J., Associate Professor; B.S., 
Yale University; A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

R. Douglas Powers, Associate Professor; A.B., 
SUNY; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Allyn H. Rule, Associate Professor; B.S., Central 
Connecticut College; A.M., Ph.D., Boston 
University 

Chester S. Stachow, Associate Professor; B.S., 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Manitoba 

Thomas Chiles, Assistant Professor; B.S., Ph.D., 
University of Florida 

Donna Maire Fekete, Assistant Professor; B.S. 
University ofVermont; Ph.D., Harvard University 
Charles S. Hoffman, Assistant Professor; S.B., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
Tufts University 



Robert J. Wolff, Senior Lecturer; B.A. Lafayette 
College; Ph.D., Tufts University 
exfcXSV? 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department of Biology offers courses lead- 
ing to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy and 
Master of Science, and cooperates with the 
Graduate School of Education in the Master of 
Science in Teaching (M.S.T.) program. 

Those seeking admission to the graduate pro- 
gram should have a strong background in biology, 
chemistry and mathematics with grades of B or 
better in these subjects. Deficiencies in prepara- 
tion may be made up in the graduate school. 
Ph.D. students must include differential calculus 
and physical chemistry in their preparation; these 
may be taken during the course of graduate stud- 
ies. 

The Ph.D. program does not require a spe- 
cific number of graduate credits; however, the 
Residence Requirements, as defined in the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences section of 
this Catalog, must be met. 

Requirements: The minimum curriculum for 
Ph.D. students consists of three core courses in 
Advanced Biochemistry (BI 604), Genetics and 
Molecular Biology (BI 605), and Cell Biology and 
Physiology (BI 608); a Laboratory Orientation 
course (BI 61 1); two additional graduate level (500 
or higher) biology courses and 4 graduate semi- 
nars (800 or higher). All Ph.D. candidates are 
expected to have taken differential and integral 
calculus and physical chemistry either before or 
during their course of studies. The physical chem- 
istry requirement may be satisfied by BI 5 1 5 , Bio- 
physical Chemistry. In addition, in order to ad- 
vance to candidacy for the doctoral degree, the 
student must pass a Comprehensive Examination 
and defend a research proposal. 

A minimum of 30 graduate credits is required 
for the Master's degree. For the M.S. in Biology 
this must include three core courses in Advanced 
Biochemistry (BI 604), Genetic and Molecular Bi- 
ology (BI 605), and Cell Biology and Physiology 
(BI 608); a Laboratory Orientation course (BI 
61 1); two additional graduate biology courses (500 
or higher), and one seminar course (800 or 
higher). Both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees require the 
presentation and oral defense of a thesis based on 
original research conducted within the Depart- 
ment under the guidance of a faculty member. 

M.S. and Ph.D. students are also expected to 
participate in the teaching of undergraduate 
courses during their course of studies. M.S.T. 
candidates are not required to follow a specific 
core curriculum, but with the advice and consent 
of their advisors take those courses that best sat- 
isfy their individual requirements. Contact the 
Department for more detailed information. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

An asterisk (*) after the course title indicates that 
a course carries a laboratory fee. Courses num- 
bered 500-599 are for undergraduate and gradu- 
ate registration. 

BI 506 Recombinant DNA Technology (F: 3) 

This course will describe the theory and practice 
of recombinant DNA technology, and its appli- 
cation within molecular biology research. Top- 
ics will include the cloning of genes from various 
organisms, plasmid construction, transcriptional 
and translational gene fusions, nucleic acid 
probes, site-directed mutagenesis, polymerase 
chain reaction, and transgenic animals. The goal 
of the course is to make the research-oriented 
student aware of the wealth of experimental ap- 
proaches available through this technology. Two 
lectures per week. Charles S. Hojftnan 

BI 510 General Endocrinology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Introductory Biology or permission 

of instructor 

Suggested: Organic Chemistry, Physiology 

Many tissues (e.g., the brain, heart, kidney) as 
well as the classical endocrine organs (e.g., adre- 
nal, thyroid) secrete hormones. The course is con- 
cerned with normal and clinical aspects of hor- 
mone action. The effects of hormones (and neu- 
rohormones) on intermediary metabolism, so- 
matic and skeletal growth, neural development 
and behavior, development of the gonads and 
sexual identity, mineral regulation and water bal- 
ance, and mechanisms of hormone action will be 
considered. The Department 

BI 515 Biophysical Chemistry (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 440 (or equivalent), two semesters 
of organic chemistry, physics with calculus, and 
one semester of biochemistry. A one-semester 
course in physical chemistry is desirable but not 
required. 

This course includes lectures on a number of 
the most important physicochemical methods for 
determining the structures of macromolecules. 
Topics include electrophoresis, sedimentation, 
viscosity, light scattering, UV and visible spectros- 
copy, ORD and CD spectroscopy, X-ray crystal- 
lography, and NMR spectroscopy. 

Recommended for seniors and graduate stu- 
dents only. The Department 

BI 540 Immunology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 2 00-2 02 , CH 1 09-1 1 or consent 
of professor 

This course emphasizes the biology of the im- 
mune response: cell-cell interactions, antibody 
synthesis and diversity, the immunoglobulins, 
evolution of self recognition versus nonself (an- 
tigen), antigenicity, antibody-antigen reactions, 
immune protection, immune destruction, and 
problems in cancer and transplantation immunity. 

Allyn H. Rule 

BI 548 Comparative Animal Physiology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 

This is a course about how animals function 
as well as why they function as they do; thus, stress 



20 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Biology 



will be laid on problems to animal survival posed 
by the environment in which they live, and on the 
various alternative solutions to those problems 
that have been evolved by different animal groups, 
both vertebrate and invertebrate. The interplay 
of the fitness of the environment and the fitness 
of animals to survive in it will be explored. 

Carol Halpern 

Bl 554 Principles of Mammalian Physiology 
(F:3) 

Prerequisite: BI 200-202 

This is a study of the fundamental principles 
and physicochemical mechanisms underlying cel- 
lular and organismal function. Mammalian organ- 
systems will be studied, with emphasis on cardio- 
vascular, respiratory and renal function and the 
endocrine regulation of metabolism. 

Grant Balkema 

Bl 556 Developmental Biology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 300 or 302 or permission of in- 
structor 

Developmental biology is in the midst of a far- 
reaching revolution that profoundly effects many 
related disciplines including evolutionary biology, 
morphology and genetics. The new tools and 
strategies of molecular biology have begun to link 
genetics and embryology and to reveal an incred- 
ible picture of how cells, tissues and organisms 
differentiate and develop. The course describes 
how both organismal and molecular approaches 
are leading to a detailed understanding of (1) how 
it is that cells containing the same genetic comple- 
ment can reproducibly develop into drastically 
different tissues and organs; and (2) what is the 
basis and role of pattern information in this pro- 
cess. Douglas Powers 

Donna Fekete 

Bl 558 Neurogenetics (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Genetics and Biological Chemistry 
The emphasis of this course is on the genetic 
and biochemical basis of neurological diseases in 
humans and mice. Special attention will be given 
to lipid storage disease, epilepsy, Huntington's 
disease, movement disorders and myelin abnor- 
malities. Thomas Seyfried 

Bl 562 Neurophysiology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 554 or permission of the instruc- 
tor 

This course is intended for advanced under- 
graduates or graduate students. The course will 
cover the biophysics of membranes, nerve and 
muscle physiology, the neuromuscular junction, 
the neuronal synapse, and sensory physiology 
with emphasis on the visual system. 

Grant W. Balkema 

Bl 570 Biology of the Nucleus (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 302, Principles of Genetic Analy- 
sis, and two semesters of Biochemistry, BI 435 
plus BI 440; or CH 561 plus CH 562; and per- 
mission of instructor/department 

This course provides an in-depth treatment of 
the molecular biology of DNA and RNA, with 
particular emphasis on the control and organiza- 
tion of the genetic material of eucaryotic organ- 
isms. Topics covered include chromatin structure, 
DNA replication, nucieosome assembly, introns, 
and RNA processing, and gene regulation. 

Anthony T. Annunziato 



Bl 580 Molecular Biology Laboratory* (S: 3) 

Pre or corequisite: BI 440 or BI 506 or equivalent 
An advanced project laboratory limited to a 
maximum of 12 students interested in hands-on 
training in the experimental techniques of mo- 
lecular biology under close faculty supervision in 
a new, dedicated laboratory designed for this pur- 
pose. In addition to formal lab training and dis- 
cussion sections, students will have access to the 
lab outside class hours to work on projects in- 
tended to produce publication quality data. Meth- 
ods taught will include macromolecular purifica- 
tion, electrophoretic analysis, recombinant DNA 
and cloning techniques, DNA sequencing, poly- 
merase chain reaction, and the use of computers 
and national databases for the analysis of DNA 
and protein sequences. Ideal for students who 
desire a solid introduction to the methods of 
molecular biology through practical training. Lab 
fee required. The Department 

Bl 604 Advanced Biochemistry (F: 3) 

Topics will include structure and function of 
nucleic acids and proteins, carbohydrates, the 
bioenergetics of metabolism, and the integration 
and control of metabolic processes, biochemistry 
of information transfer, including DNA replica- 
tion, transcription and translation. 

Joseph Orlando 
Chester S. Stachow 

Bl 605 Genetics and Molecular Biology (F: 3) 

This course will cover basic genetic mechanisms, 
a study of gene one structure and a variety of cel- 
lular strategies for the control of gene expression. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the use of 
modern technology to approach current questions 
in molecular biology. M. Kathleen Dunn 

Charles S. Hoffman 
William H. Petri 

Bl 608 Cell Biology and Physiology (S: 3) 

This course includes topics in membrane 
physiology and cell motility, cellular anatomy and 
organelle function, intercellular connection 
and communications, targeting mechanisms for 
proper intracellular compartmentalization. Re- 
lated topics in immunology will also be addressed. 

Thomas Chiles 
Donna Fekete 

Bl 61 1 Department Research and Laboratory 
Orientation (F: 1) * 

This course will introduce new graduate students 
to department research programs and facilities. 
Required of first-year M.S. and Ph.D. students. 

The Department 

Bl 68 1 Graduate Neurobiology (S: 3) 

This is a discussion course. Students will be re- 
quired to attend BI 481 lectures and one addi- 
tional weekly meeting of 2 hours to discuss criti- 
cal papers in the field. The discussion time will 
be by arrangement. All students interested in the 
neurosciences are encouraged to take this course 
in their first semester. William Brunken 

Bl 799 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 

By arrangement. The Department 

Bl 801 Thesis Seminar (F: 3-S: 3) 

A research problem for M.S. candidates of an 
original nature under the direction of a member 
of the staff. The Department 



Bl 802 Thesis Direction* (F: 0-S: 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their thesis. This course must be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. By arrange- 
ment. The Department 
Bl 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 
For Master's candidates who have completed all 
course requirements but wish to remain enrolled 
while preparing for comprehensive examinations. 

The Department 

Bl 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F: 0-S: 0) 

Required for Doctoral students who have com- 
pleted all course requirements but are preparing 
for comprehensive examinations. 

The Department 

Bl 999 Doctoral Continuation (F: 0-S: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. The Department 

Courses offered by the Biology Department 
on a non-periodic basis in response to student 
needs and faculty availability. Consult the depart- 
ment prior to each semester for anticipated 
offerings: 

BI 519 Fundamentals of Radiation Biology 
BI 533 Plant Improvement Strategies 
BI 538 Biology of Cell Cycle 
BI 552 Developmental Neurobiology 
BI 561 Molecular Evolution 
BI 654 Developmental Genetics 
BI 746 Immunochemistry 

BI 747 Advanced Immunological 
Techniques 

BI 750 Bacterial Physiology and Metabolism 

BI 760 Biochemical Control Mechanisms 

BI 808 Growth Factors and Oncogenes 

BI 809 Selected Topics in Molecular 

Immunology 
BI 810 Seminar in Fertilization and Gamete 

Physiology 

BI 812 Seminar in Neurophysiology 

BI 814 Seminar in Bacterial MetaboUsm 

BI 82 1 Topics in Yeast Molecular Genetics 

BI 824 Seminar in Physiology 

BI 828 Seminar on the Functional Role of 
Metals in Biological Systems 

BI 830 Topics in Plant Molecular Biology 
BI 842 Gene Regulation and Chromatin 
Structure 

BI 843 Seminar in Advances in Nucleic Acid 

Research 
BI 846 Seminar/Neurobiology 
BI 848 Cellular Immunology 

BI 860 Seminar in Molecular Biology and 

Genetics/Bacteriology 
BI 864 Seminar in Developmental Biology 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • CEERA • 21 



Center For East Europe, 
Russia and Asia (CEERA) 



The Center's programs encourage faculty and 
students to participate in interdepartmental en- 
deavors on both the graduate and undergraduate 
levels. Participating faculty come from the De- 
partments of Education, Fine Arts, History, Phi- 
losophy, Political Science, Slavic and Eastern 
Languages, and Theology, and offer over eighty 
academic courses connected with the study of the 
culture, history and political life of East Europe, 
Russia and Central Asia. 



HS 272 (PO 080) Introduction to Russian, 
Soviet and East European Studies (F: 3) 

This course provides the student with the key 
themes, theories and approaches necessary for 
further detailed study of Russia, the former 
USSR, and places special emphasis on the East 
European States. The major findings and meth- 
ods used by specialists in various disciplines will 
be previewed and presented. 

CEERA also sponsors talks and symposia on 
topics of interest. 



Graduate students may also earn a certificate 
of proficiency from the Center. Certificate re- 
quirements and other information on the opera- 
tion of the Center are available from Prof. 
Raymond T. McNally (History), Director, Carney 
171 and from Prof. Donald Carlisle (Political 
Science), Assistant Director, McGuinn 220. 

Information on graduate degree programs 
with related area concentrations should be ob- 
tained directly from the academic departments: 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D. in History or Philosophy; A.B., 
M.A. in Russian or in Slavic Studies (Slavic and 
Eastern Languages). 



Chemistry 



FACULTY 

Joseph Bornstein, Professor Emeritus; B.S., Boston 
College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Andre J. de Bethune, Professor Emeritus; B.S., 
St. Peter's College; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Robert F. O'Malley, Professor Emeritus; B.S., 
M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

Michael J. Clarke, Professor; A.B., Catholic 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Paul Davidovits, Professor; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Amir H. Hoveyda, Professor; B.A., Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Evan R. Kantrowitz, Professor; Chairperson of 
the Department; A.B., Boston University; A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

T. Ross Kelly, Vanderslice Professor-; B.S., Holy 
Cross College; Ph.D., University of California at 
Berkeley 

David L. McFadden, Professor; A.B., Occidental 
College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Larry W. McLaughlin, Professor; B.Sc, 
University of California at Riverside; Ph.D., 
University of Alberta 

Yuh-kang Pan, Professor; B.S., National Taiwan 
University; Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Mary F. Roberts, Professor; A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College; Ph.D., Stanford University 

Dennis J. Sardella, Professor; B.S., Boston College; 
Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology 

Larry T. Scott, Professor; A.B., Princeton 
University; Ph.D., Harvard University 



William H. Armstrong, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Bucknell University; Ph.D., Stanford University 

E. Joseph Billo, Jr., Associate Professor; B.S., 
M.S., Ph.D., McMaster University 

Udayan Mohanty, Associate Professor; B.Sc, 
Cornell University; Ph.D., Brown University 

Martha M. Teeter, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Wellesley College; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University 

Lawrence B. Kool, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst 

Marc Snapper, Assistant Professor; B.S., Union 
College; Ph.D. Stanford University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs 
leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy 
and Master of Science in analytical, inorganic, 
organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and bio- 
chemistry. The Master of Science in Teaching 
(M.S.T.) is offered in cooperation with the 
Graduate School of Education. 

All entering graduate students take 4 or 5 
qualifying examinations in inorganic, analytical, 
organic, biochemistry, and physical chemistry. 
Master's degree candidates must take the exami- 
nations at least once for placement purposes. 
Ph.D. candidates are required either to pass the 
Qualifying Examinations or to satisfy specified 
foundation course requirements. 

Formal courses may be waived in the first year 
in areas of demonstrated proficiency, as revealed 
by the Qualifying Examinations. 

Requirements: Every student is expected to at- 
tain a grade point average of at least 2.50 at the 
end of his or her second semester in the Graduate 
School and to maintain it thereafter. If this 



standard is not met, the student may be required 
to withdraw from the graduate program. 

There is no total credits requirement for the 
Ph.D. degree; 30 credits are required for the 
M. S. degree. First-year requirements provide the 
student with a breadth of knowledge in the tradi- 
tional fields: analytical, inorganic, organic, bio- 
chemistry, and physical chemistry. Beyond the 
first year, each student will pursue a program of 
studies, with the approval of his/her advisor, con- 
sistent with his/her individual educational goals. 

At the end of the second year, Ph.D. candi- 
dates must pass an oral exam that stresses mate- 
rial from their own research specialty and other 
related areas. Members of the student's thesis 
committee comprise the exam committee. Stu- 
dents who do not pass this exam will be placed in 
the M. S. degree program. 

The Comprehensive Examination for the 
M.S. degree is a public, oral defense of the 
student's research thesis. The Ph.D. Comprehen- 
sive Examination consists of a series of cumula- 
tive examinations that test the student's develop- 
ment in his or her major field of interest and criti- 
cal awareness and understanding of the current 
literature. 

Both the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees require a 
thesis based upon original research, either experi- 
mental or theoretical. During the second year, re- 
search will be the major effort of the student seek- 
ing a Master's degree. For the Ph.D. candidate, a 
research project requiring three to four years of 
sustained effort will begin usually after the first 
year of study. An oral defense of the dissertation 
before a faculty thesis committee completes the 
degree requirements. A public presentation of the 
thesis is also required. 

Some teaching or equivalent educational ex- 
perience is required. This requirement may be 
satisfied by at least one year of service as a teach- 
ing assistant or by suitable teaching duties. Ar- 
rangements are made with each student for a 



22 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Chfaiistry 



teaching program best suited to his/her overall 
program of studies. Waivers of teaching require- 
ments may be granted under special circum- 
stances with the approval of the Chairperson. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

An asterisk (*) after a course title indicates that the 
course carries a laboratory fee. 

CH 520 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry (F: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the principles 
of inorganic chemistry with emphasis on struc- 
tural and thermodynamic aspects. 

William H. Armstrong 

CH 523 Organometallic Chemistry (F: 3) 

This course will present concepts of organome- 
tallic chemistry, i.e., the chemistry of compounds 
that have bonds between metals and carbon. 
Organotransition metal chemistry will be 
emphasized. Among the areas to be covered will 
be the following: structure and bonding in 
organotransition metal complexes, ligand sys- 
tems, catalysis, polymerizations, common reac- 
tions, and applications in organic synthesis. The 
course is intended for graduate students and ad- 
vanced undergraduates who have completed or 
are currently enrolled in organic and inorganic 
chemistry courses. Lawrence B. Kool 

CH 531 Modern Methods in Organic Synthesis I 

(F:3) 

Survey and analysis of reactions employed in the 
synthesis of medicinally significant compounds. 
An in-depth understanding of the physical basis 
for these transformations is emphasized. Topics 
will relate fundamental structural and electronic 
molecular properties to issues of chemical reac- 
tivity. Emphasis will be placed on carbon-carbon 
bond and ring forming reactions. 

Marc L. Snapper 

CH 539 Principles and Applications of NMR 
Spectroscopy (S: 3) 

This course will provide a detailed understand- 
ing of the principles and applications of NMR 
spectroscopy. The course is intended for chem- 
istry and biochemistry students who will use 
NMR in their research. Four general aspects of 
NMR will be considered: theoretical, instrumen- 
tal, experimental, and applied. Emphasis will be 
placed on understanding the theoretical concepts 
and experimental parameters necessary to acquire, 
process, and interpret NMR spectra. The course 
will include a practical component on departmen- 
tal NMR spectrometers. John Boylan 

CH 551 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (S: 3) 

This course is a consideration of modern 
instrumental methods of analysis, including 
atomic emission and absorption, ultraviolet, 
visible, infrared, and Raman spectrometry, flu- 
orometry, x-ray methods, electroanalytical meth- 
ods (potentiometry, coulometry, voltammetry), 
and gas and liquid chromatography. 

William H. Armstrong 

CH 561-562 Biochemistry (F: 3-5: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 231-232 or equivalent 

This is a two-semester introductory-level 
course in Biochemistry. Topics in the first semes- 
ter concentrate on protein structure and function; 
bioenergetics; kinetics and mechanisms of enzyme 



reactions; intermediary metabolism; control of 
metabolic pathways; and photosynthesis. Topics 
in the second semester concentrate on the struc- 
ture of nucleic acids; recombinant DNA technol- 
ogy; mechanisms of gene rearrangements; DNA 
replication; RNA synthesis and splicing; protein 
synthesis; control of gene expression; membrane 
transport; and hormone action. Experimental 
methods will also be discussed as they relate to 
course topics and to the separate laboratory course 
(CH 563). Evan R. Kantrowitz 

Larry W. McLaughlin 

CH 563 Experimental Biochemistry* (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: General Chemistry, Organic Chem- 
istry and Biochemistry 

A laboratory course intended to prepare stu- 
dents for research in the Biochemical Sciences. 
This course will concentrate on the isolation and 
characterization of proteins, enzymes, nucleic ac- 
ids and lipids as well as recombinant DNA tech- 
nology. State-of-the-art instrumentation will be 
used to this end in a laboratory especially designed 
for this course. A variety of experimental tech- 
niques will be used, including electrophoresis, 
chromatography, spectroscopy, and centrifuga- 
tion. Data will be collected and analyzed directly 
by computer, as often as possible. Lab fee required. 

Robert S. Umans 

CH 573 Quantum Chemistry and Molecular 
Structure (S: 3) 

A development of the principles of quantum me- 
chanics as they apply to inorganic and organic 
systems. The emphasis is on the use of molecu- 
lar orbital methods and a discussion of group 
theory. Yuh-kang Pan 

CH 575 Physical Chemistry I (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Three (3) semesters of Calculus, 2 
semesters of Physics, 2 semesters of Organic 
Chemistry 

This course covers the fundamental principles 
and applications of equilibrium thermodynamics. 

Chemistry graduate students may register for 
this course only if they are advised to do so by the 
Department. Udayan Mohanty 

CH 576 Physical Chemistry II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 575 

This course is an introduction to the prin- 
ciples of reaction kinetics, kinetic molecular 
theory, and quantum mechanics of atoms and 
molecules. 

Chemistry graduate students may register for 
this course only if they are advised to do so by the 
Department. The Department 

CH 582 Advanced Topics in Biochemistry (F: 3) 

A selection of current and important topics in 
Biochemistry will be examined. Students are ex- 
pected to have a basic understanding of the con- 
cepts developed in CH 561 and CH 562. Areas 
of interest will include the following: (1) the modi- 
fication of enzymes and their use in understand- 
ing structure and mechanism, (2) current aspects 
of nucleic acids structure and recognition and 
reactivity, (3) drug activity and development as it 
relates to macromolecular structure. 

Thomas T Tibbitts 



CH 584 Crystal Structure Analysis (F: 3) 

X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis of both 
small molecules and macromolecules. Theoreti- 
cal as well as practical aspects of structure analy- 
sis will be stressed. Subjects include crystal 
growth, crystal lattices and space groups, produc- 
tion and diffraction of X-rays, crystal structure 
solution, refinement, analysis of structures, and 
computer graphic display of structures. Exercises 
and problem sets will supplement the lectures. 

Martha M. Teeter 

CH 586 Organic Chemistry of Biological 
Reactions (S: 3) 

This course is a study of the reactions of life. The 
biological chemistry of nucleic acids, amino ac- 
ids, enzyme co factors, and other molecules of life 
will be discussed in detail. An understanding of 
the molecular properties of these systems will be 
used to study issues of biological reactivity. 

Marc L. Snapper 

CH 734 Chemistry of Natural Products (F: 3) 

This is a survey of the chemistry of naturally oc- 
curring substances, such as steroids, terpenes and 
alkaloids. The structure determination, synthe- 
sis and biosynthesis of representative molecules 
will be discussed. T. Ross Kelly 

CH 799-800 Reading and Research* (F: 2 or 3- 
S: 2 or 3) 

A course required of Ph.D. matriculants for each 
semester of research. The Department 

CH 801 Thesis Seminar* (F: 3-5: 3) 

This course includes a research problem, requir- 
ing a thorough literature search and an original 
investigation under the guidance of a faculty 
member, for M.S. candidates. The Department 

CH 802 Thesis Direction* (F: 0-S: 0) 

This is a non-credit course for those who have 
received six credits for Thesis Seminar but who 
have not finished their thesis. This course must 
be registered for and the continuation fee paid 
each semester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 

CH 805-806 Departmental Seminar (F: IS: 1) 

This is a series of research seminars by leading 
scientists both from within the Department and 
from other institutions that are presented on a 
regular (usually weekly) basis. 

William H. Armstrong 

CH 821-822 Inorganic Chemistry Seminar 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of 
current interest in inorganic chemistry with par- 
ticipation by students and faculty members. Stu- 
dents will submit papers and give oral presenta- 
tions of topics based on recent literature in inor- 
ganic chemistry. Discussions of research in 
progress in the Department will be included. 
Occasionally visiting lectures will participate. 

Michael J. Clarke 

CH 831-832 Organic Chemistry Seminar 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of 
current interest in organic chemistry with partici- 
pation by students and faculty members. Students 
will submit papers and give oral presentations of 
topics based on recent literature in organic chem- 
istry. Discussions of research in progress in the 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Classical Studies • 23 



Department will be included. Occasionally visit- 
ing lecturers will participate. Larry T. Scott 

CH 861-862 Biochemistry Seminar (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of 
current interest in biochemistry with participation 
by students and faculty members. Students will 
submit papers and give oral presentations of top- 
ics based on recent literature in biochemistry. 
Discussions of research in progress in the Depart- 
ment will be included. Occasionally visiting lec- 
turers will participate. Martha M. Teeter 

CH 871-872 Physical Chemistry Seminar 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of 
current interest in physical chemistry with partici- 
pation by students and faculty members. Students 
will submit papers and give oral presentations of 
topics based on recent literature in physical chem- 
istry. Discussions of research in progress in the 
Department will be included. Occasionally visit- 
ing lecturers will participate. Udayan Mohanty 



CH 997 Master's Comprehensive (F, S: 3) 

This course consists of a public, oral defense of 
the student's thesis research. The Department 

CH 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F, S: 3) 

This course consists of a series of cumulative writ- 
ten examinations that test the student's develop- 
ment in his or her major field of interest (organic, 
inorganic, analytical, physical, biochemistry) and 
critical awareness and understanding of the cur- 
rent literature. Six of sixteen exams must be passed 
over a two-year period. The Department 

CH 999 Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. The Department 

Courses offered by the Department on a non- 
periodic basis: 

CH 535 Physical Organic Chemistry 
CH 567 Protein Structure and Function 



CH564 


Physical Methods in Biochemistry 


CH565 


Structure, Function and Reactivity of 




Nucleic Acids 


CH566 


Bioinorganic Chemistry 


CH567 


Protein Structure and Function 


CH568 


Advanced Biochemistry and 




Enzymology 


CH569 


Enzyme Mechanisms 


CH570 


Introduction to Biological 




Membranes 


CH572 


Quantum Chemistry and 




Spectroscopy 


CH579 


Modern Statistical Mechanics 


CH580 


Dynamics of Simple Liquids 


CH672 


Quantum Mechanics 


CH725 


Physical Methods in Inorganic 




Chemistry 


CH738 


Heterocycles 


CH770 


Advanced Physical Chemistry — 




Dynamics 



Classical Studies 



FACULTY 

Dia M.L. Philippides, Professor; B.A., Radcliffe 
College; M.A., Boston College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Princeton University 

Charles F. Ahern, Jr., Associate Professor; 
Chairperson of the Department; B.A., Wesleyan 
University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Eugene W. Bushala, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Wayne State University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 
University 

David H. Gill, S. J., Associate Professor; B.A., 

M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard University; 

Lie. Theology, St. Georgen, Frankfurt-am-Main 

txfcXsbo 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department grants an MA. degree in Latin 
or Greek or in Latin and Greek. The degree can 
be obtained in either of two ways: (1) by thirty 
credits in course work, or (2) by twenty-four cred- 
its in course work plus six credits of thesis semi- 
nar (with special permission). 

Requirements: Candidates for the degree are 
required to complete a departmental reading list 
in either Latin or Greek authors, or both, depend- 
ing on the type of degree sought. Comprehensive 
examinations will be written and oral, consisting 
of translations from the authors on the reading 
list, questions on the content of the candidate's 
course work, on the general history of Latin 
and/or Greek literature, and on the thesis, if of- 
fered in partial fulfillment of the requirements. 

A student's modern language reading ability 
in French or German will be tested by the De- 
partment. 

The M.A.T. degree, administered jointly by 
the Classics Department and the Graduate School 



of Education, is offered for students wishing to 
prepare for teaching. For further information 
contact the Chairperson of our Department. 

The Department also offers courses in Mod- 
ern Greek language, literature and culture. These 
courses, listed in full in the undergraduate cata- 
logue, do not regularly qualify as credits for an 
MA. degree. 

It is sometimes possible, through prior agree- 
ment with the instructor, for a graduate student 
in the Department to gain graduate credit for tak- 
ing an undergraduate course. 

Incoming students can expect to find major 
Greek and Latin authors and genres taught on a 
regular basis; these include on the Greek side, 
Homer, lyric poets, 5th century dramatists 
(Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes) 
the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, Plato, 
and 4th century orators; on the Latin side, they 
include Plautus and Terence, the late republican 
poets Catullus and Lucretius, Cicero, Augustan 
poetry (Virgil, Horace, elegy and Ovid), the his- 
torians Livy and Tacitus, and the novel. In the last 
two years the following courses have been offered: 
CL 323 Greek Patrology (S: 92) 
CL 328 Cicero and Friends (S: 92) 
CL 333 Apuleius (F: 92) 
CL336 Horace: The Odes (S: 92) 
CL 348 Catullus (F: 92) 
CL 363 Aristophanes (S: 92) 

CL 376 Advanced Reading: Ancient Greek 
Drama (F: 92) 

CL 382 Herodotus (S: 93) 

CL 42 5 The Annals of Tacitus (S: 93) 

CL 450 Roman Elegy (S: 93) 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

CL 010-01 1 Elementary Latin (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will introduce the fundamentals of 
Latin grammar and vocabulary. The aim is to 
prepare a student to read simple Latin prose. 

Eugene W. Bushala 

Maria Kakavas 

Sister Mary Daniel O'Keeffe 

CL 020-021 Elementary Ancient Greek 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will introduce the fundamentals of 
ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary. The aim 
is to prepare a student to read something like 
Plato's Apology after a year's study. John Shea 

CL 052-053 Intermediate Ancient Greek 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is a review of the essentials of Classi- 
cal Attic grammar and a close reading of selections 
from Greek literature, usually Xenophon's 
Anabasis, Plato's Apology and/or Crito and 
Euripides' Medea. Special provision will be made 
to meet the needs of students of philosophy (e.g., 
more Plato) and theology (e.g., New Testament 
instead of classical authors). David Gill, S.J. 

CL 056-057 Intermediate Latin (F: 3-S: 3) 

A thorough review of essential grammatical forms 
presented in Elementary Latin along with a close 
reading of an introductory selection of Roman 
prose and poetry. Eugene IV. Bushala 

John Shea 
Joel Werthman 

CL 060-061 Elementary Modern Greek 

This is an introduction to the study of Demotic 
Greek. This course will introduce the fundamen- 
tals of grammar and will focus on reading ability, 
oral comprehension, and oral expression. Class 



24 • Gradi \i i Arts and Sciences • Cl\sskal Studies 



instruction is supplemented l>v required labora- 
tory work. Offered alternate years. 

Maria Kakavas 

CL 070-071 Intermediate Modern Greek 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Elementary Modern Greek 

This second-year course in the Modern Greek 
language will enable the student to enjoy the read- 
ing of representative contemporary writers such 
as Kazantzakis, Myrivilis, Seferis, Samarakis, 
Taktsis and Elytis. Maria Kakavas 

CL 121 Tragedy and Comedy (F: 3) 

This course is an inquiry into the origins, devel- 
opment, and nature of tragedy and comedy. The 
aims ot the course are analytical (how to interpret 
individual works), historical (what to say about 
different types of tragedy and comedy over the 
centuries), and ethical (what issues are raised, in 
what differing contexts, by tragedies and com- 
edies). Charles F. Ahem, Jr. 

CL 1 86 Greek Civilization (F: 3) 

After a brief survey of Greek history, the course 
will focus on the distinctive achievements of Ath- 
ens at her creative peak in the fifth century BCE: 
the development and working of the Adienian 
Democracy; the drama (Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
Euripides, Aristophanes); the Periclean building 
program (Parthenon, etc.); the beginnings of phi- 
losophy (the Sophists and Socrates); the rise and 
fall of the Athenian Empire (Herodotus and 
Thucydides). Reading will be mostly from the 
original sources (in translation). David Gill, S.J. 

CL 202 Classical Greek Drama in Translation 

(S:3) 

Selected plays from 5 th century Attic drama, in- 
cluding Aeschylus' Oresteia trilogy, Sophocles' 
Antigone and Oedipus Rex, Euripides' Medea, 
Hippolytus and Bacchae, Aristophanes' Frogs and 
Lysistrata, will be read in English. Secondary read- 
ings, visual materials (videotapes of performances, 
and slides) and discussion will focus on the devel- 
opment of classical drama, the ancient theater, 
stagecraft, and contemporary society, including 
the roles of men and women and issues of justice, 
heroism and ethics. 

This course is of interest to students in the 
theater, English and other literatures that are 
influenced by the form and content of classical 
drama. Provision may be made for students in 
Classics to read certain portions in Greek. 

Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 2 1 2-2 1 3 (FA 2 1 1 -2 1 2) Art of the Ancient 
Mediterranean World (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course deals with die visual history and arts 
of the Ancient Mediterranean world, from the rise 
of civilizations along the Nile, in the I loly Land, 
and Mesopotamia to the fall of the western Ro- 
man Empire, about 4X0. Cities, sacred areas, pal- 
aces, and building for communication, civic ser- 
vices and war will be included, as well as paint- 
ing, sculpture, jewelry, and coinages. 

Cornelius Verineide 
CL 217 (EN 209) The Ancient Epic (S: 3) 
This course is a study ol the Iliad and the Odyssey 
of I lomerand the Aeneid of Virgil as masterpieces 
of western literature. Emphasis is on thematic and 
narrative structure and the epic hero. 

David Gill, S.J. 



CL 238 Translation Workshop/Advanced Greek 
Reading (F: 3) 

Students will analyze and interpret several repre- 
sentative short stories in Modern Greek Litera- 
ture, and they will confront the problems of trans- 
ladon and prepare their own translation of at least 
two short stories. Maria Kakavas 

CL 262 Roman Civilization (S: 3) 

After a survey of the broad outlines of Roman 
history, the course will focus on selected topics 
that illustrate the character of life in the early 
Roman empire — the years of Roman Peace. 
Among these topics are family life, social stratifi- 
cation, mythology and religion (including sla- 
very), and popular entertainment (the infamous 
shows). The aim of the course will be to look not 
so much at the monumental achievement of Ro- 
man imperial government as at the varied texture 
of life under that government. 

Charles F. Ahern, Jr. 

CL 270 Advanced Topics in Modern Greek 

A seminar introducing its participants to advanced 
methods of reading and research in Modern 
Greek Studies, usually leading to the production 
of a term paper. 

The course may be repeated for credit as its 
content varies each time it is given. Offered alter- 
nate years. Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 271 Advanced Topics in Modern Greek 

(S:3) 

A seminar in which the students will be intro- 
duced to advanced bibliographic methods and 
with them investigate a topic (or topics) in Mod- 
ern Greek literature, linguistics, history or cul- 
ture. This course may be repeated. 

Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 280 Currents in Modern Greek Literature 

(S:3) 

A survey of highlights from Modern Greek litera- 
ture examining in each case, as appropriate, some 
of the following factors: the "Greekness" of the 
work, its debt to the Ancient (pagan) and Byzan- 
tine (Christian) tradition, the crosscurrents arriv- 
ing from East and West, the influence of contem- 
porary political, artistic, and societal conditions. 
The course is offered entirely in English, 
diough it also forms an elective towards the Mi- 
nor in Modern Greek Studies. No knowledge of 
the Modern Greek language is necessary, but pro- 
vision may be made for those wishing to read cer- 
tain texts in Greek. Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 290 Computers and (Modern) Greek 

A course that will introduce its participants to 
some of the ways in which die study of Greek may 
be enhanced through the use of the computer. 
The course is expected to center on language and 
literature, with particular applications in research 
and publishing and possible extensions to educa- 
tion. 

This course will count as equivalent to Ad- 
vanced Topics in Modern Greek, the most advanced 
seminar for the Minor in Modern Greek Studies. 
It can be expanded to accommodate advanced stu- 
dents of Ancient Greek; this requires prior discus- 
sion with the instructor. Offered triennially. 

Dia M.L. Philippides 



CL 320 (TH 423) Seminar in Latin Patrology 

(S:3) 

See course description under TH 423. 

Margaret Schatkin 

CL 323 (TH 425) Seminar in Greek Patrology 

(F:3) 

See course description under TH 425. 

Margaret Schatkin 

CL 326 Roman Historians (F: 3) 

This course includes reading in Latin of selections 
from Livy and Sallust. Included are lectures and 
supplementary reading on the history of the pe- 
riods. David Gill, S.J. 

CL 329 Ovid's Metamorphoses (F: 3) 

This course includes reading and discussion of 
selected stories from Ovid's long narrative poem 
about mythological transformations. We will con- 
sider Ovid's skill as a story teller and his insight 
into the instability in the world of nature and 
human personality. Charles F. Ahern, Jr. 

CL 340 Greek Lyric Poetry (F: 3) 

This course includes reading a selection of ancient 
Greek lyric poetry. John Shea 

CL 346 Latin Prose Composition (S: 3) 

This course will give students practice in both the 
analysis and the composition of Latin prose. The 
emphasis in both components will be on sentence 
structure: the ordering of words and the logic of 
word groups, that is, of phrases and clauses, of 
subordination and coordination, and of parallel- 
ism and antithesis. In the latter part of the term 
the analytic component will also encompass writ- 
ing short papers in English, about the stylistic 
coloring of the passages read in Latin. A firm 
knowledge of Latin grammar at the intermediate 
level is necessary Students who have not taken an 
advanced reading course in Latin should consult 
with the instructor before enrolling. 

Charles F. Ahern, Jr. 

CL 353 Advanced Readings in Latin (S: 3) 

This course includes a reading in Latin of an au- 
thor or authors in accordance with the needs of 
the students. The Department 

CL 388 Advanced Readings in Ancient Greek 

(S:3) 

This course includes reading in Greek of an au- 
thor or authors to be selected in accordance with 
the needs of the students. The Depart?nent 

CL 790-91 Readings and Research (F: 3-S: 3) 

Charles F. Ahern, Jr. 

Eugene W. Bus ha la 

David Gill, S.J. 

Maria Kakavas 

Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For Master's candidates who have completed all 
course requirements but wish to remain enrolled 
while preparing for the comprehensive 
examination. The Departrnent 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Economics • 25 



Economic s 



FACULTY 

RobertJ. McEwen, S.J., Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
Boston College; MA., Fordham University; Ph.L., 
S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Boston College 

James E. Anderson, Professor; A.B., Oberlin 
College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Richard J. Arnott, Professor; B.S., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; M.A., M. Philosophy, 
Ph.D., Yale University 

David A. Belsley, Professor; A.B., Haverford 
College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Frank M. Gollop, Professor; A.B., University of 
Santa Clara; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Peter Gottschalk, Professor; B.A., M A., George 
Washington University; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Marvin C. Kraus, Professor; B.S., Purdue 
University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

William B. Neenan, S.J., Professor, Academic Vice 
President and Dean of Faculties; A.B., A.M., S.T.L., 
St. Louis University; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

Joe Peek, Professor; B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State 
University; Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Joseph F. Quinn, Professor; Chairperson of the 
Department; A.B., Amherst College; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Donald K. Richter, Professor; B.A., M.A., Yale 
University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Donald J. White, Professor and Dean, Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences; B.S., Boston College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Christopher F. Baum, Professor; A.B., Kalamazoo 
College; A.M., Florida Adantic University; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan 

Donald Cox, Associate Professor; B.S., Boston 
College; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Bruce Hansen, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Occidental College; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Francis M. McLaughlin, Associate Professor; 
Assistant Chairperson of the Department; B.S., 
A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

Robert G. Murphy, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Williams College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 

Harold A. Petersen, Associate Professor; A.B., 
DePauw University; Ph.D., Brown University 

Fabio Schiantarelli, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Bocconi University, Italy; M.S., Ph.D., London 
School of Economics 

Richard W. Tresch, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Williams College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 



Chong-en Bai, Assistant Professor; B.S., China 

University; M.S. Institute of Mathematics, 

Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ph.D., University 

of California at San Diego; Ph.D., Harvard 

University 

T. Christopher Canavan, Instructor; B.A., 

Oberlin College; M.I.A., Columbia University 

School of International Affairs; M.A., Ph.D., 

Columbia University 

Douglas Marcouiller, S.J., Instructor; A.B., 

Princeton; Ph.D. (cand.), University of Texas at 

Austin 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The graduate program in Economics is oriented 
primarily toward full-time students who are seek- 
ing a Ph.D. A limited number of students are also 
accepted to the M.A. program, which may be 
undertaken on either a part-time or full-time ba- 
sis, and in rare cases, applicants are accepted as 
part-time students in the Ph.D. program. 

Ph.D. Program 

The doctoral program is designed to train econo- 
mists for careers in teaching or research by pro- 
viding strong backgrounds in economic theory, 
quantitative research methods, and applied fields. 
Requirements for the Ph.D. include a minimum 
of eighteen courses, comprehensive examinations, 
a one-year residence requirement, and a thesis. 

In the first year of the doctoral program, stu- 
dents are usually required to take two semesters 
of Micro Theory (EC 700, 701), two semesters 
of Macro Theory (EC 703, 704), two semesters 
of Mathematics for Economists (EC 711, 712), 
one semester of Statistics (EC 727), and one se- 
mester of Econometrics (EC 728). The first se- 
mester of each theory sequence provides an in- 
tuitive bridge to theoretical concepts, as well as 
an introduction to the mathematical formulation 
of economic concepts. This prepares the student 
for the standard mathematical graduate approach, 
which characterizes the second term. Students 
who enter with equivalent prior background may 
be exempted from Mathematics for Economists, 
Statistics, or the first semester of Micro or Macro, 
however, at the discretion of the Director of 
Graduate Studies. Those students who are ex- 
empted from some first-year courses are expected 
to elect additional courses from those listed up to 
a total of four courses each semester. 

In the second year, students complete a third 
semester of Micro (EC 702) and Macro Theory 
(EC 705), take a course in Applied Econometrics 
(EC 729), as well as courses from a wide range of 
electives. Students may substitute EC 829-830 
(Applied Econometrics II and III) for EC 729. 
The elective offerings include advanced micro 
theory, econometric theory, applied economet- 
rics, monetary economics, public finance, indus- 
trial organization, international trade and finance, 
urban economics, labor economics, and finance. 



Students may also take independent study and, 
subject to departmental approval, may take 
courses in other departments ot Boston College, 
or at Boston University, Tufts, or Brandeis. 

Comprehensive examinations are given in 
January and May of each year. All students must 
pass written comprehensives in micro theory and 
macro theory by May of their third year. Field 
comprehensives must be passed in two fields from 
those listed above. 

Total course requirements for the Ph.D. in- 
clude eighteen courses, minus any that may be 
waived by examination. Students in the doctoral 
program must maintain a B+ average in their 
course work and make satisfactory progress to- 
ward the completion of a dissertation to remain 
in good standing. 

M.A. Program 

The M.A. program in Economics is designed to 
train people for careers as research economists in 
business or government. It is aimed at students 
who qualify, by virtue of both interest and apti- 
tude, for a sophisticated program in quantitative 
economic analysis but who do not wish to make 
the time commitment required of a Ph.D. 

Requirements for the M.A. degree include the 
satisfactory completion often courses and a writ- 
ten comprehensive examination in macro theory, 
micro theory, and econometrics. The ten courses 
will generally include two semesters of Micro 
Theory (EC 700-701) and Macro Theory (EC 
703-704); one semester each of Mathematics for 
Economists (EC 711); Statistics (EC 727); Econo- 
metrics (EC 728); and three electives. 

The M.A. program is offered as a self-con- 
tained program, but the M.A. degree will also be 
awarded, upon request, to Ph.D. students who 
meet the M.A. requirements in the course of the 
doctoral work, and pass their theory comprehen- 
sive examinations. 

Admissions Information 

Students who are quite sure they wish to pursue 
a Ph.D. should apply for admission directly to the 
Ph.D. program and not to the M.A. program. 
Requirements for admission are at the same level 
for both programs, and students who are admit- 
ted to one may usually transfer, given satisfactory 
performance, to the other. Financial aid is avail- 
able only to full-time students in the Ph.D. pro- 
gram. 

Requests for further information or for appli- 
cation forms for admission should be addressed 
to the Committee on Admissions, Economics De- 
partment, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 
02167. Applicants are required to submit college 
transcripts, three letters of recommendation, a 
statement of purpose, and scores from the Gradu- 
ate Record Examination's quantitative, verbal, 
and analytical tests. Ph.D. applicants interested in 
financial assistance awarded by the Department 
of Economics should ensure that their applica- 
tions are completed by March 15. Applications 
completed beyond that date will be considered but 
will be subject to reduced chances of financial aid 



26 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Economics 



awards. MA students are not eligible for this type 
of financial assistance. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

EC 700 Microeconomic Theory I (F: 3) 

This course discusses basic geometric and math- 
ematical models of consumer behavior, firm be- 
havior and market structure. An emphasis is 
placed on the application of these concepts to 
policy issues. David Belsley 

EC 701 Microeconomic Theory II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 700 or its equivalent 

This course considers topics in consumer and 
producer theory; decentralization of economic 
decision making; general equilibrium theory and 
welfare economics. Marvin Kraus 

Richard Arnott 

EC 702 Microeconomic Theory III (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 700 and 70 1 or their equivalent 
The first half of the course is an introduction 
to non-cooperative game theory with applications 
to oligopoly theory, bargaining, and signaling 
games. The second part of the course covers top- 
ics in information and mechanism design. Top- 
ics covered will include adverse selection, moral 
hazard, Arrow's impossibility theorem and social 
choice. Chong-en Bai 

EC 703 Macroeconomic Theory I (F: 3) 

A thorough treatment of the basic Keynesian and 
classical models. This course considers the deter- 
mination of output, interest rates and prices by 
using basic graphical and mathematical ap- 
proaches. Joe Peek 

Robert G. Murphy 

EC 704 Macroeconomic Theory II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 703 or its equivalent 

This course presents an in-depth analysis of 
the components of aggregate demand and 
financial markets. Particular emphasis is placed on 
the empirical application of relevant theories. 

Robert G. Murphy 
Fabio Schiantarelli 

EC 705 Macroeconomic Theory III (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 703 and 704 or their equivalent 
This course develops two important macro- 
economic frameworks: the infinitely-lived repre- 
sentative agent framework and the overlapping 
generations framework. These frameworks share 
the common features of general equilibrium in- 
teraction among markets and intertemporal op- 
timization. The frameworks are used to study the 
cyclical fluctuations of the macroeconomy and the 
role for government policy. Emphasis is placed on 
theoretical aspects, although relevant empirical 
work will often be introduced. 

T. Christopher Canavan 

EC 71 1 Mathematics for Economists (F: 3) 

This course will cover the following topics: (1) 
differential calculus — limits, partial derivatives, 
Jacobians, differentials, maxima and minima of 
functions of several variables, Lagrange multipli- 
ers, implicit function theorem, envelope theorem; 
(2) elementary economic applications — compara- 
tive static analysis, dual approach to economic 
theory. Chong-en Bai 



EC 712 Mathematics for Economists II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 711 and 727 or their equivalent 
Maximization subject to inequality con- 
straints; difference equations; introduction to sto- 
chastic processes; differential equations; introduc- 
tion to dynamic optimization. The Department 

EC 727 Statistics (F: 3) 

This course presents the statistical background 
required as an introduction to the study of econo- 
metrics: probability, sampling distributions, sta- 
tistical problems of point and interval estimation 
and hypothesis testing. Bruce Hansen 

EC 728 Econometric Theory and Methods (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 711 and 727 or their equivalent 
This course develops the basic tools of esti- 
mation for linear economic models. The major 
concerns include simple and multiple linear re- 
gression, hypothesis testing for simple and joint 
hypotheses, linear restrictions, dummy variables, 
analysis of covariance, generalized least squares, 
and instrumental variables. The elements of ma- 
trix algebra are reviewed, and an introduction to 
simultaneous equations methods is given. 

Christopher F. Baum 

EC 729 Applied Econometrics I (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: EC 727-728 or their equivalent 

This course presents a set of selected topics 
in applied econometrics. These include pooled 
cross section time series models, limited depen- 
dent variable estimation techniques, varying pa- 
rameter regression models, mixed estimation, and 
nonlinear statistical models. The emphasis is 
placed upon practice, with exercises drawn from 
several large research data sets, using a variety of 
econometric computer software. The course is of 
special interest to the student embarking on his/ 
her dissertation research. Christopher F. Baum 

EC 808 Advanced Micro Theory I 

This course will cover topics of the instructor's 
interest in advanced microeconomic theory. A 
recent offering focused on the areas of game 
theory (normal and extensive form), (imperfect) 
information theory, and bargaining theory, with 
applications to current problems in economics. 
Not offered 1 994- 9 5 Chong-en Bai 

EC 809 Advanced Micro Theory II 

This course will cover topics of the instructor's 
interest in advanced microeconomic theory. Not 
offered 1994-95 The Department 

EC 827 Econometric Theory I (F: 3) 

This course provides an introduction to the ba- 
sic tools and theory of econometrics. Relevant 
matrix algebra and multivariate distribution 
theory are developed and applied to the tradi- 
tional linear regression model and its extensions. 
Autocorrelation, errors in variables and other 
single equation problems will be discussed in this 
context. David Belsley 

EC 828 Econometric Theory II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 827 

This course is a continuation of material of 
EC 827. It includes a development of estimation 
in the general stochastic model and in systems of 
simultaneous linear equations. David Belsley 



EC 829 Applied Econometrics II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 728 or equivalent and EC 704 

This course covers major advances in time 
series analysis. In addition to univariate and mul- 
tivariate models for stationary time series, it ad- 
dresses the issues of unit roots and cointegration. 
The Kalman filter and time series models of 
heteroskedasticity are also discussed. The course 
stresses the application of technical tools to eco- 
nomic issues, including testing money-income 
causality, stock market efficiency, the life-cycle 
model and the sources of business cycle 
fluctuations. Fabio Schiantarelli 

EC 830 Applied Econometrics III (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 728 or equivalent 

This course covers major advances in 
microeconometrics. The course will present de- 
velopments in estimating models with limited 
dependent variables, random and fixed effects 
models and duration models. Peter Gottschalk 

EC 831 Topics in Econometrics 

Selected topics in advanced econometric theory 
and methods. Not offered 1994-95 

The Department 

EC 853 Industrial Organization I (F: 3) 

This course is an introduction to modern indus- 
trial organization theory. Topics will include, as 
time permits, the game theoretic approach to oli- 
gopoly theory, theories of barriers to entry, preda- 
tory pricing, R&D competition and applications 
to trade theory. The Department 

EC 854 Industrial Organization II (S: 3) 

This course includes an economic analysis of an- 
titrust and regulatory policies. Review of modern 
antitrust policy including a study of major cases 
and the economics literature commenting on an- 
titrust policy, analysis of the genesis of regulation, 
peak-load pricing, optimal departures from mar- 
ginal cost pricing, automatic adjustment clauses, 
and the empirical evidence regarding regulation- 
induced inefficiencies, investigation of the special 
problems of regulatory reform and deregulation 
in particular industries. Frank M. Gollop 

EC 861 Monetary Economics I (F: 3) 

This course will examine the standard issues in 
advanced macroeconomics and monetary theory, 
placing particular emphasis on the role of inside 
money (credit) and the crucial role of information 
in the functioning of modern economies. Topics 
to be covered include the role of national debt and 
intergenerational allocation, inflation finance and 
optimal seignoirage, sunspot theory, and the ef- 
fect of information partitions on economic effi- 
ciency. Robert G. Murphy 

EC 862 Monetary Economics II (S: 3) 

This course considers various topics in monetary 
theory and policy with a particular emphasis on 
empirical applications. Not offered 1994-95 

Joe Peek 
Fabio Schiantarelli 

EC 865 Public Sector Economics I (S: 3) 

This course covers most of the traditional topics 
in this subject: welfare economics, market failure 
and rationales for government intervention, the 
theory of tax policy and tax structure, the positive 
effects of taxation on labor supply, on 
intertemporal decisions, and on risk-taking, tax 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • English • 27 



incidence, taxation and growth, and normative, 
second-best tax and public expenditure theory, 
including cost-benefit analysis and public enter- 
prise pricing. Richard Tresch 

EC 866 Public Sector Economics II 

This course emphasizes problems of collective 
decision-making under complete and incomplete 
information. Topics include Arrow's Impossibil- 
ity Theorem, the new political economy, an in- 
troduction to mechanism design with special 
emphasis on demand-revealing mechanisms for 
public goods, voluntary provision of public goods, 
and the regulation of externalities. 

Richard Arnott 

EC 871 Theory of International Trade (S: 3) 

Emphasis on the structure of general equilibrium, 
welfare and commercial policy propositions, and 
the foundations of comparative advantage. The 
course also covers imperfect competition and 
uncertainty. James E. Anderson 

EC 872 International Finance (F: 3) 

Analysis of macroeconomic adjustment in open 
economies, with attention to foreign exchange 
markets, balance of payments, and the interna- 
tional monetary system. Robert G. Murphy 

T. Christopher Canavan 



EC 885 Analysis of Labor Markets 

A comprehensive microeconomic approach to 
wage theory and the theory of labor markets fo- 
cusing on labor supply, household production, 
marginal productivity, human capital, search dis- 
crimination, and dual labor market theories. 
Heavy emphasis on specification and estimation 
of empirical models. Not offered 1994-95 

Peter Gottschalk 

EC 886 Current Topics in Labor Economics (F: 3) 

This course covers topics of current interest in 
labor economics. Examples include analysis of 
life-cycle consumer behavior estimation tech- 
niques applied to survey microdata, minimum 
wage legislation, agency problems, informational 
economics and intergenerational transfers. Both 
theoretical and empirical issues are investigated. 

Donald Cox 

EC 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For Master's candidates who have completed all 
course requirements but are preparing for com- 
prehensive examinations. The Department 



EC 893 Urban Economics I (S: 3) 

This course covers basic urban economic 
theory — spatial economics, housing, transporta- 
tion, and local public finance. Richard Arnott 

Marvin Kraits 

EC 894 Urban Economics II 

This course covers a selection of more advanced 
topics in urban economic theory — agglomeration, 
systems of cities, non-monocentric cities, non- 
competitive models of housing, transportation 
and the theory of the second-best, and the eco- 
nomics of downtown parking. Not offered 
1994-95 Richard Arnott 

EC 998 Doctoral Comprehensives (F: 0-S: 0) 

Required for Doctoral students who have com- 
pleted all course requirements and are preparing 
for Comprehensive examinations. 

The Department 

EC 999 Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register for 
doctoral continuation during each semester of 
their candidacy whether or not they remain in 
residence. 



English 



FACULTY 

P. Albert Duhamel, Professor Emeritus; B.A., 
College of the Holy Cross; A.M., Boston College; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

John J. Fitzgerald, Associate Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., Boston College; A.M., Ph.D., Fordham 
University 

John H. Randall, III, Associate Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., Columbia University; A.M. University of 
California at Berkeley; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota 

Joseph McCafferty, Assistant Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., A.M., Boston College 

Joseph A. Appleyard, S.J., Professor; A.B., Boston 
College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

J. Robert Barth, S.J., Professor; Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Rosemarie Bodenheimer, Professor; A.B., 
Radcliffe College; Ed.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

AdeleM. Dalsimer, Professor; A.B., Mt. Holyoke 
College; M.S., Hunter College; Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Paul Lewis, P?vfessor; A.B., City College of New 
York; A.M., University of Manitoba; Ph.D., 

University of New Hampshire 

Robin R. Lydenberg, Professor; A.B., Barnard 
College; A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University 

John L. Mahoney, Rattigan Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard University 



Kristin Morrison, Professor; A.B., Immaculate 
Heart College; A.M., St. Louis University; Ph.D ., 
Harvard University 

Richard J. Schrader, Professor; A.B., Notre Dame 
University; A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

E. Dennis Taylor, Professor; A.B., College of the 
Holy Cross; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

Christopher P. Wilson, Professor; KR., Princeton 
University; Ph.D., Yale University 

Judith Wilt, Professor; Chairperson of the 
Department; A.B., Duquesne University; Ph.D., 
Indiana University 

Henry A. Blackwell, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Morgan State College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago 

Robert L. Chibka, Associate Professor; B.A., Yale 
University; M.F.A., University of Iowa; M.A., 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Mary Thomas Crane, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Harvard College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Paul C. Doherty, Associate Professor; A.B., College 
of the Holy Cross; A.M., Boston University; Ph.D., 
University of Missouri 

Carol Hurd Green, Adjunct Associate Professor; 
B.A., Regis College; M.A., Georgetown 
University; Ph.D., George Washington 
University 

Dayton Haskin, Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of Detroit; A.M., Northwestern 
University; B.D., University of London; Ph.D., 
Yale University 



Robert Kern, Associate Professor; A.B., City 
College of New York; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

JosephA. Longo, Associate Professor; B.S.,M.Ed., 
A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Suzanne M. Matson, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Portland State University; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Washington 

John F. McCarthy, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Harvard University; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

PhilipT. O'Leary, Associate Professor; A.B., Holy 
Cross; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Robert E. Reiter, Associate Professor; A.B., St. 
Bonaventure University; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

Frances L. Restuccia, Associate Professor; B.A., 
M.A., Occidental College; Ph.D., University of 
California at Berkeley 

Alan Richardson, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Princeton University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Jennifer A. Sharpe, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Cecil F. Tate, Associate Professor; A.B., University 
of Maryland; A.M., Ph.D., Emory University 

Andrew J. Von Hendy, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Niagara University; A.M., Ph.D., Cornell 
University 

James D. Wallace, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Earlham College; M.A., Bread Loaf School of 
English; Ph.D., Columbia University 



28 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • English 



William Youngren, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Amherst College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Raymond G. Biggar, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Bowdoin College; MAT., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Alexandra Chasin, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Brandeis University; M.A., Ph.D. Stanford 
University 

Anne Fleche, Assistant Professor; B.A., State 
University at Buffalo; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers State 
University 

Elizabeth Kowaliski-Wallace, Assistant Professor; 
B.A.Trinity College; M.A., M. Phil., Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Francis W. Sweeney, S. J., Assistant Professor; 
A.B., College of the Holy Cross; Ph.L., Weston 
College; A.M., Boston College 

Laura Tanner, Assistant Professor; B.A., Colgate 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Laurence Tobin, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Earlham College; M.A., University of Chicago; 
Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

John Anderson, Visiting Assistant Professor; B.S. 
University of Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Regina Hanson, Visiting Assistant Professor; B.A. 
Tufts University; Ph.D., Boston College 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Master of Arts Program 

Students seeking the degree of Master of Arts in 
English will be expected to complete satisfacto- 
rily the requirements in courses granting at least 
30 hours of graduate credit, three of which must 
be in a course on Bibliography. As an option, up 
to six of the required 30 hours of graduate credit 
may be directed to courses of independent study 
resuldng in a longer paper either critical or cre- 
ative in nature. Students wishing to pursue this 
option should consult with the Program Advisor 
early in their graduate careers. 

Students must also pass two written examina- 
tions — a language examination and a literary stud- 
ies examination. The first will demonstrate the 
candidate's ability to read a foreign language. The 
second will test three different skills or practices 
associated with literary studies — the ability to read 
closely a short poem or prose passage, the ability 
to gauge the style and content of a number of pas- 
sages and then to place them in their proper his- 
torical period, and the ability to apply a theoreti- 
cal or methodological position to a specific text. 
The examinations are offered in December and 
May. The language exam may be taken at any 
administration during the course of a student's 
program; the literary studies examination is to be 
taken only after all courses have been completed 
or are in the process of completion. Students 
should consult with the Director of the M.A. and 
with other faculty to plan an appropriate course 
of studies in anticipation of the examinations. The 
candidate may elect to take the foreign language 



examination in a wide range of languages related 
to an area of special interest. The written exami- 
nation may be waived if the candidate can supply 
proof of proficiency in a language other than 
English in the form of an undergraduate tran- 
script carrying credits for the completion of at 
least six semester hours in an advanced course 
with grades of B or better: the course must have 
been completed within three years of application 
for waiver. 

Copies of the list of titles upon which the can- 
didate will be examined are available from the De- 
partment upon registration. Students are advised 
to see the Program Advisor in order to help them 
prepare for this examination by making an in- 
formed choice of the courses regularly available 
to them. 

Master of Arts in American Studies 

American Studies at Boston College is an inter- 
departmental program leading to the Master of 
Arts degree. Cooperating faculty include mem- 
bers of the English, History, Political Science, 
Sociology and Fine Arts departments. Admission 
of any applicant will be determined by both the 
major department and the American Studies 
Committee. 

The Program is designed to encourage an un- 
derstanding of the American experience by bring- 
ing students to an integrated view of American 
Culture. Candidates concentrate in a major de- 
partment, while integrating the methods of inter- 
disciplinary work developed in a year-long 
colloquium and seminar in the literature and prac- 
tice of American Studies. In addition, the student 
is required to take one research seminar, plus 
twelve hours of graduate work in his/her major 
field, and nine in a field related to that major in- 
terest. At the end of a student's course of study, 
the Master's candidate undergoes an oral exami- 
nation testing his/her ability to synthesize several 
areas of knowledge. 

The Program also has several extracurricular 
dimensions. It has been a focal point for programs 
drawing upon the cultural resources of the Bos- 
ton area. In past years, the Program has sponsored 
a Teacher's Institute in Boston history, and the 
Architectural Heritage Program's summer course 
sponsored by the Commons. 

Master of Arts Concentration in Irish 
Literature and Culture 

Since the 1991-92 academic year, Boston College 
has offered a Master of Arts degree with a con- 
centration in Irish Literature and Culture under 
the auspices of the English Department. Candi- 
dates seeking the degree will be expected to com- 
plete within two years requirements in courses 
granting thirty hours of graduate credit, at least 
twelve of which must be in Anglo-Irish literature. 
In addition, unless proficiency is demonstrated in 
a written examination, all candidates will be re- 
quired to complete six credits of course work in 
the Irish language as a step towards achieving 
reading ability in modern Irish. Remaining cred- 
its may be taken in Irish Studies courses offered 
by other University departments, such as History, 
where there is already a graduate program in Irish 
history, Music, Fine Arts, and Slavic (where Old 
Irish is taught). As an option, up to six credits of 
the required thirty hours may be directed to 



courses of supervised independent research. 
Qualified students may also elect to spend part of 
the second semester of their second year at Uni- 
versity College, Dublin. At the end of the course 
of study, students will take an interdisciplinary 
oral examination, focusing on a specific period, 
genre, or theme chosen by themselves after con- 
sultation with members of the Irish Studies fac- 
ulty. 

English faculty offering graduate courses in 
Irish Studies will include Professors Adele 
Dalsimer, and Philip O'Leary. In addition, begin- 
ning in the 1991 academic year, the distinguished 
visiting scholar holding the Burns Chair in Irish 
Studies will teach graduate courses in the pro- 
gram. The Holder of the Burns Chair for Fall 
1994-95 is Sean O'Tuama, Professor of Celtic 
Studies at University College, Cork. 

Information concerning the program can be 
obtained by writing to the Program Director, 
Philip O'Leary, at the Department of English, 
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

The Department, in cooperation with the Gradu- 
ate School of Education, offers a program lead- 
ing to the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching. 

Graduate Assistantships and Teaching 
Fellowships 

Students in the first year of the M.A. program are 
eligible to receive financial aid in the form of tu- 
ition remission. Second year students are eligible 
for Teaching Fellowships, conferring a stipend 
and partial remission of tuition. 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate 
Study 

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in 
English is a permanent part-time program prima- 
rily intended for English teachers who wish to ex- 
tend and broaden their professional preparation 
beyond the requirements of a Master's degree, but 
it is also flexible enough to meet the needs of the 
many who may wish to continue their education 
through further cultural study. 

The Certificate will be awarded upon the 
completion of 30 graduate credit hours, at least 
half of which must ordinarily be in English De- 
partment courses. The balance can be taken in any 
related areas, such as history, philosophy, classics, 
modern languages or art that may be of particu- 
lar interest or usefulness to the teacher concerned 
with developing specialized courses or the gen- 
eral student interested in exploring new areas. 

To provide for the needs of the in-service 
teacher, whose professional development is the 
continuing concern of this program, the English 
Department regularly schedules courses in the 
late afternoon on a wide variety of periods and 
authors. The program also provides opportuni- 
ties for independent directed-study courses that 
may be tailored to meet the needs of special stu- 
dents. 

Doctor of Philosophy Program 

Usually, no more than four students will be ad- 
mitted to the doctoral program each year. The 
small number of students makes possible a flexible 
program, individually shaped to suit the interests 
and needs of each student. 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Englisi i • 29 



All students accepted into the program receive 
stipends and tuition remission. Fellowships are re- 
newed for four years as long as the student is mak- 
ing satisfactory progress toward completion of re- 
quirements for the degree. 

Course Requirements 

The only specified course requirements are four 
doctoral seminars to be taken usually in the first 
two years. The remainder of the student's pro- 
gram may include other courses in the graduate 
English department or related disciplines, small 
reading groups, or individual tutorials. Most stu- 
dents will have taken eight to ten courses by the 
end of the second year. 

Language Requirement 

Students must demonstrate an ability to read two 
foreign languages or a working knowledge and ap- 
plication of one foreign language and its litera- 
ture. The first alternative requires successful per- 
formance on two translation examinations in 
which a short text must be translated adequately 
(with use of a dictionary) in two hours. The sec- 
ond involves submitting a paper in which knowl- 
edge of the foreign language is used to work out 
a literary question or translating a substantial criti- 
cal or literary text currently unavailable in En- 
glish. 

Examinations 

Each student will direct a course of study toward 
completion of one major and three minor exami- 
nations. 

A major examination consists of a two-hour oral 
examination usually on a period or genre. 

A minor examination is narrower in scope and 
normally runs one and one-half hours. It may 
consist of an oral or written examination on a 
reading list, but students are also encouraged to 
choose forms for minor examinations that ap- 
proach the material with a particular pedagogi- 
cal or scholarly end in view: design of a course or 
plan for an anthology; delivery of a lecture; prepa- 
ration and defense ot a paper for publication. 

All examinations are graded according to the 
University scale for graduate examinations. The 
Chairperson of the examining board submits the 
grade immediately and prepares, as soon as pos- 
sible, a written evaluation of the examination for 
the student and the departmental records. Other 
members of the board may also submit individual 
reports. 

Teaching 

Students are required to teach two one-semester 
undergraduate courses under the supervision of 
a faculty member. For at least one of the semes- 
ters the student will teach a section of the depart- 
mental Freshman English course. For the other 
semester the student may continue to work in this 
program or may teach a course of the student's 
own design for more advanced undergraduates, 
or may work in a course for beginning English 
majors in cooperation with a member of the fac- 
ulty and other doctoral students. 

Dissertation 

After consultation with a faculty advisor, the stu- 
dent will write a prospectus describing the thesis 
topic and include a tentative bibliography. This 
material will be submitted to a dissertation direc- 
tor and two readers who will supervise, read and 
approve the dissertation. 



Students are responsible for acquainting 
themselves with all University requirements, fees, 
and deadlines pertinent to thesis submission and 
graduation. This information can be obtained 
from the English Department office or from the 
Graduate Arts and Sciences Dean's Office. 

Ph.D. Colloquium 

A student committee organizes and schedules 
monthly Ph.D. colloquia, at which faculty mem- 
bers, outside speakers, or doctoral students lead 
discussions on literary topics. Graduate students 
and faculty are invited. 

Course of Study 

The Ph.D. program is designed so that it may be 
completed in four years. Each student plans and 
paces an individual course of study in consulta- 
tion with the Program Advisor. 

Students should keep the following guidelines 
in mind (counting each required seminar, exami- 
nation, semester of teaching as one unit): 

• 5 units should be completed by the beginning 
of the second year; 

• 10 units should be completed by the beginning 
of the third year; 

• 13 or more units and the language requirement 
should be completed by the beginning of the 
fourth year. 

The fourth year should be largely devoted to 
the dissertation, but the student is urged to choose 
a topic, consult with a thesis director, and begin 
work before the end of the third year, even if an 
examination remains to be passed. 

Program in Linguistics 

The Program in Linguistics, in the Department 
of Slavic and Eastern Languages, offers courses 
for graduate students in English who want to 
study English from a linguistic perspective or to 
examine the nature of language generally. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

EN 609 Medieval Survey (S: 3) 

The aim of the course is to survey the best and 
most significant literature written in English from 
the 12th through the 15th centuries, excluding 
Chaucer. Readings will be mostly in Middle En- 
glish, with some modernization. Such works as 
Layamon V Brut, The Anchoresses' Rule, The Fox and 
the Wolf, The Land of the Cokayne, Handling Sin, 
SirOrfeo, the alliterative Morte Arthure, Barbour's 
The Bruce, The Pearl, Piers Plowman, Sir Gaivain 
and the Green Knight and Malory's Morte d Arthur 
will be read in full or in part. Relevant cultural, 
social, and political background will be discussed. 

Raymond Biggar 

EN 708 Introduction to Contemporary Theory 

(S:3) 

This course is designed to help graduate students 
in literature become familiar with some major 
trends in contemporary critical theory. Because 
an attempt to cover all aspects of this field is bound 
to produce confusion, vertigo, nausea, and de- 
spair, we will concentrate on only three areas: 
deconstruction, psychoanalytic criticism, and 
feminism. Readings will include texts by such 
figures as Barthes, Derrida, Kristeva, Freud, 
Lacan, Irigaray, Gilbert and Gubar, Cixous, and 
others. Robin Lydenberg 



EN 713 Studies in the Seventeenth Century 
(S:3) 

This course will examine and explore seven- 
teenth-century religious literature (broadly de- 
fined) from perspectives made available by recent 
developments in literary theory. It will entail the 
study of English Bibles as material objects, of vari- 
ous biblical books (e.g., Job, the Song of Solomon) 
as models for early modern writing, and of popu- 
lar reading habits as strategies for transforming 
ancient texts into a medium for defining the self. 
Works composed in the seventeenth-century that 
are likely to make their way onto the syllabus in- 
clude Shakespeare's Measure for Measure and 
Twelfth Night, Donne's Christmas sermons, the 
poetry of George Herbert and Richard Crashaw, 
autobiographical narratives by women (gathered 
in the recent collection called Her Own Life), and 
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress. Dayton Haskin 

EN 721 Milton (F: 3) 

This course will explore the major poetry and 
prose of John Milton through a series of recent 
critical debates about the construction of author- 
ship, the representation of gender, and the rela- 
tions between historical events and literary texts. 
In the first selection of the course we will concen- 
trate on Milton's earlier works, including Lycidas, 
Cmnus, Areopagitica, and excerpts from the Divorce 
Tracts.ln the second section of the course we will 
read Paradise Lost in detail along with critical es- 
says by feminist, psychoanalytic, and New His- 
toricist scholars. After reading Samson Agonistes 
and Paradise Regained, we will close with a con- 
sideration of Milton's position in the canon, his 
influence (particularly in the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies), and the changing status of his poetry. 

Amy Boesky 

EN 734 African American Literature (S: 3) 

Close reading of classic and contemporary texts, 
mostly fiction, with attention to their employment 
of blues, folkloric and American traditions. There 
will also be discussion of recent literary criticism 
in the field and an examination of ways to include 
African American writers in courses that one ex- 
pects to teach. Henry Blackwell 

EN 763 Modern British Fiction (S: 3) 

The course will be a study of the continuities and 
disruptions among modernist experimenters of 
three generations: Conrad, Woolf and Beckett. 
The principal texts will be Conrad's The Secret 
Agent and Nostromo, Woolf s Mrs. Dalloway, To 
The Lighthouse and The Waves and Beckett's Watt 
and Molloy. Andrew Von Hendy 

EN 790 The Irish Renaissance (S: 3) 

The writings of the major — and some less well 
known — contributors to the Irish literary renais- 
sance will be studied and their relation to the 
major political and social movements of the time 
will be considered. Readings will be drawn from 
political commentators and cultural critics 
as well as literary figures: D.P. Moran, Thomas 
MacDonagh, W.B. Yeats, Douglas Hyde, 
Standish O'Grady and J. M. Synge. 

Adele Dalsimer 

EN 791 Seminar: Gender, Writing, Romanticism 

(F:3) 

In this course we will explore the relation of gen- 
der differences to literature and other kinds of 



30 • Gradcatk Arts and Sciences • English 



writing in the British Romantic era (1780-1832). 
We will begin with a review of the major works 
of Mary Wollstonecraft in the context of early 
British feminism. Against this background we will 
read poetry by Hannah More, Anne Yearsley, 
Anna Barbauld, Joanna Baillie, Felicia Hemans, 
and Letitia E. Landon, and the representation of 
femininity in the works of such male Romantics 
as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, and 
P. B. Shelley; the journals of Dorothy 
Wordsworth; the slave narrative of Mary Prince; 
and novels by Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, and 
Mary Shelley. We will concurrendy be reading 
recent essays in feminist history, theory, and in- 
terpretation. Alan Richardson 

EN 808 Chaucer (F: 3) 

We will study the Canterbury Tales, a few other 
poems by Chaucer, ancillary documents treating 
medieval life and art, and selected Chaucerian 
scholarship. Richard Schrader 

EN 822 Reading and Teaching Fiction (F: 3) 

Assembling critical traditions, theoretical and 
pedagogical questions on genres (realistic and 
romantic), gender and psyche, racial and national 
consciousness, in four interlocking areas: (1) a 
graduate level reading of George Eliot's Daniel 
Deronda (2) reading and teaching modernist 
narratology and canon formation to undergradu- 
ates with Heart of Darkness and Return of the Sol- 
dier, (3) reading and teaching popular culture 
genres. Judith Wilt 

EN 825 Composition Theory and the Teaching 
of Writing (S: 3) 

This course is designed (1) to prepare graduate 
students to teach introductory, college-level writ- 
ing courses; (2) to introduce students to central 
problems, issues, and methods in composition 
studies; and (3) to examine ways in which contem- 
porary critical theory (e.g., feminism, psycho- 
analysis, cultural studies, and poststructuralism) 
has influenced the teaching and study of compo- 
sition. Lad Tobin 

EN 826 Seminar: Dickens and Victorian Culture 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

This course will begin to construct a picture 
of the stresses in mid-Victorian culture primarily 
through the vision of Charles Dickens, one of its 
most brilliant exemplars and critics. We will read 
six Dickens novels, along with the work of other 
Victorian social commentators (Gaskell, Engels, 
Mayhew, Carlyle, Ruskin) and some contempo- 
rary critics. The course will be divided into three 
interconnected parts: gentility and criminality, 
centering on readings of Oliver Twist, David 
Copperfteld, and Great Expectations. We will con- 
sider Dickens's obsession with constructing male 
and female gentility in relation to the criminal 
class. Industrialism will look at Dickens's relation 
in Hard Times to the debates about the emergent 
working class, in the context of Engels, Gaskell, 
and other social commentators. Social totalities 
will juxtapose the panoramic novels Bleak House 
and Our Mutual Friends, to consider the shift in 
social vision from failed paternalism to a culture 
of commodity. Rosemarie Bodenheimer 



EN 827 Pleasure and Pain in Contemporary 
Women's Writing (F: 3) 

This course will examine various forms of 
women's pain and their relationship to pleasure 
in contemporary fiction by writers such as 
Brookner, Duras, Lispector, Naylor, Walker, 
Acker, and Cisneros. We shall also read theorists 
on the subject: Freud, French feminists (Kristeva), 
and American feminists (Kaja Silverman and Jes- 
sica Benjamin). One consideration will be whether 
these writers, including the theorists, reinforce or 
refute the notion that women enjoy suffering. Is 
pain constitutive of female subjectivity naturally, 
pathologically, culturally? How can varieties of 
women's pleasure in pain (melancholia, female 
mystical masochism, the masochistic jouissance of 
maternity) be protected from appropriation as a 
justification of woman abuse? Frances Restuccia 

EN 828 The Irish Novel in English, 1922-1939 

(F:3) 

This course is a survey of the Irish novel in En- 
glish from the foundation of an independent Irish 
state in 1922 to the beginning of the Emergency 
(World War IT) in 1939. Writers to be studied will 
include the following: O'Connor, O'Faolain, 
O'Flaherty, O'Donnell, MacNamara, Stephens, 
K. O'Brien and Eimar O'Duffy. Some time will 
be spent filling in the contemporary cultural cli- 
mate and discussing such issues as the definition 
of national identity, state censorship, and ques- 
tions of linguistic choice for bilingual authors. 

Philip O'Leary 

EN 829 Beckett and Modern Drama (F: 3) 

One of many ways to characterize modern drama 
is in terms of its lack of clear resolution. Drama, 
theatre, necessarily involves action; but whether 
that action seems to conclude or merely to stop 
will mark the difference between traditional 
drama and modern drama. 

This course will examine a number of plays in 
English from the Elizabethan period to the 
present, with special emphasis on the works of 
Samuel Beckett, in an effort to understand how 
resolution or its lack helps define what has come 
to be called modern drama. Kristin Morrison 

EN 833 Advanced Seminar in Modern 
American Fiction (S: 3) 

Focusing on fiction by Larsen, Yezierska, 
Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Wright and oth- 
ers, this course will explore the way in which theo- 
ries of narrative and representation may compli- 
cate traditional readings of the modern American 
novel. Special attention will be paid to issues of 
readership, gender, space, power, race and 
ethnicity. Laura Tanner 

EN 834 American Studies Colloquium: 
American Studies as Cultural Studies (F: 3) 

This course will introduce traditional American 
Studies methods and then compare them with 
more recent developments in the field. We will 
go on to consider some recent trends in Cultural 
Studies, focusing particularly on ways of studying 
the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, 
and national identity in concrete local instances. 
While the course will work largely as an exercise 
in comparative methodology, we will also through 
readings, films, and independent research treat 
particular historical moments as cases in point. 

Alexandra Chasin 



EN 835 Literature, Religion and Theory (F: 3) 

A course designed to explore the ways in which 
religiously oriented theory intersects with other 
theoretical approaches to literature. The course 
will study a set of approaches, and use key critical 
figures, in relation to some sample literary works 
(stories by O'Connor, poems by Stevens, etc.). 
The approaches include the biblical materialist 
theologies of story telling. Also considered will be 
traditions of religious discussion of individual 
writers and/or periods, to be assigned as projects. 
This will be a seminar in the original sense, in 
which all will participate in the establishment of 
this emerging field study, the articulation of a 
religious-literary, and the establishment of rel- 
evant bibliography. E. Dennis Taylor 

EN 836 Media Culture, Narrative (F: 3) 

This course attempts to integrate a number of 
recent research developments within the history- 
of-the-book, authorship, reading, and journalism; 
more generally, it examines recent theoretical 
inquiries about the relationship between narra- 
tive, ideology, and culture. Centering almost ex- 
clusively on American material from the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries, the focus will be 
the relationship between the cultural and social 
positioning of media forms and the practices of 
cultural and social positioning of media forms and 
the practices of cultural, literary and historical 
interpretation. Christopher Wilson 

EN 837 The Long Eighteenth Century: Pope to 
Blake (S: 3) 

Studies in British history and literature from its 
Restoration roots to its late eighteenth, early nine- 
teenth-century Romantic stirrings. The course 
will focus on selected topics: the poetry of Pope; 
the satire of Swift; the literary, political, and moral 
theory of Johnson, Burke, and Reynolds; the 
emergence of women writers; the literature of 
Sensibility; the prophecy of Blake. 

The class will also read a representative sample 
of traditional criticism as well as recent — 
especially New Historicist and Feminist — 
approaches. John Mahoney 

EN 839 Introduction to Gender Theory (S: 3) 

An introduction to some of the major writings and 
debates in and around gender theory, through 
both theoretical and literary texts. We will look 
at the way gender theory develops from and 
intersects with re-evaluation of other fields, such 
as male and modernism, feminism, 
poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, film studies and 
performance studies, and the way it has influenced 
sexual politics more generally. Readings will be 
supplemented by a number of activities outside 
class, including film screenings, one or two trips 
to the theater, and some fieldwork on the local 
political scene. Anne Fleche 

EN 850 Seminar: Critical Approaches to 
Shakespeare (S: 3) 

This course will survey a range of critical ap- 
proaches to Shakespeare's Jacobean plays. Plays 
to be read may include Twelfth Night, Measure for 
Measure, Hamlet, Macbeth, Troilus and Cressida, 
King Lear, Othello, Coriolanus, Antony and 
Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. 
Students will be responsible for reading a play and 
several critical articles illustrating different ap- 
proaches to it. We will discuss the presuppositions 



Graduatr Arts and Sciences • Fine Arts • 3 1 



behind and implications of new critical, post 
structuralist, psychoanalytic, Marxist, feminist, 
and new historical/materials approaches to these 
plays. Mary Crane 

EN 882 Bibliography and Method (F: 3) 

A course for first-year graduate students designed 
to introduce them to the tools of their profession, 
and to develop their skills in bibliography, schol- 
arship, and criticism. Richard Schroder 

EN 883 Electronic Bibliography (F: 3) 

In addition to the traditional skills in bibliogra- 
phy, scholarship, and criticism required of gradu- 
ate students in our profession, this course will 
introduce new methods made possible by com- 
puter networks, including use of BitNet and the 
Internet, scholarly discussion lists, Telnet, and 
Gopher. No previous computer skills are re- 
quired, though they would be helpful. 

James Wallace 

EN 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 



EN 899 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 

EN 928 Ph. D. Colloquium: The Whitman 
Tradition (F: 3) 

Starting with Nature, The Poet, and several other 
anticipatory essays by Emerson, this course will 
attempt to define and trace the development of a 
distinctive tradition in American poetry grounded 
in the politics, formal strategies, and philosophi- 
cal assumptions of Whitman's Leaves of Grass. 
Writers to be studied (other than Emerson and 
Whitman) will include Wallace Stevens, W. C. 
Williams, Allen Ginsberg, and Gary Snyder. 

Robert Kern 

EN 929 Ph.D. Colloquium: The New Historicism 
(S:3) 

New Historicism is the latest and one of the more 
complicated wrinkles in critical theory and prac- 
tice. This course explores its origins in the work 
of Michel Foucault, its development into its cur- 
rent form of the Renaissance studies of Stephen 
Greenblatt, and its application to American liter- 
ary history by Sacvan Bercovitch, Jonathan Arac, 
and others. We will also consider the attacks on 



New Historicist methodology by formalists, femi- 
nists, and so on. The purpose of the course is not 
only to familiarize students with a specific body 
of theory, but to analyze the way this profession 
carries on its discourse, its conversation about its 
own practices. The readings are demanding and 
frustrating, so be prepared. James Wallace 

EN 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F: 0-S: 0) 

For students who have not yet passed the Doc- 
toral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the 
status of a non-matriculating student for the one 
or two semesters used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

EN 999 Doctoral Continuation (F: 0-S: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. The Department 



Fine Arts 



FACULTY 

Pamela Berger, Professor; A.B., A.M., Cornell 
University; Ph.D., New York University 

John Michalezyk, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; M.Div., Weston College School of 
Theology; Ph.D., Harvard University 

John Steczynski, Professor; Chairperson of the 
Department; B.F.A., Notre Dame University; 
M.F.A., Yale University 

Josephine von Henneberg, Professor; Doctor in 
Letters, University of Rome 

Elizabeth G. Await, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Boston College; M.F.A., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Kenneth M. Craig, Associate Professor; B. A., M. A., 
Ohio State University; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College 

Jeffery W. Howe, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Carleton College; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 

Michael W. Mulhern, Associate Professor; B.F.A., 
University of Dayton; M.F.A., Columbia 
University 

Nancy Netzer, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Connecticut College; M.A., Tufts University; 
M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Reva Wolf, Assistant Professor; B.A., Brandeis 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Institute of Fine Arts, 
New York University 

Andrew Tavarelli, Visiting Artist and Adjunct 
Assistant Professor; B.A., Queens College 



Gail G. Ted Bohr, S. J., Instructor; B.A., M.A., 
St. Louis University; M.A. Fordham University; 
Ph.D. (cand.), M.A. University of Mexico 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Although the Fine Arts Department does not of- 
fer an advanced degree, the courses listed below 
as well as some of those found in the Undergradu- 
ate Catalog can be taken for graduate credit upon 
application to the Department. These offerings 
may provide complements for the various inter- 
disciplinary and special programs offered by the 
University. 

Advanced students may participate in the 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts Seminar Program, 
which offers art history courses taught by the 
museum staff. For details, inquire at the Fine Arts 
Department office. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Art History 

FA 31 1 Greek Art and Archaeology (F: 3) 

The art of the ancient Greeks is the visible testi- 
mony of one of the great ages of Western civili- 
zation. We will study architecture, sculpture and 
painting. This class will consider the art of 
Minoan Crete and Mycenae on the mainland of 
Greece as precursors to Greek art. Then we will 
study Greek art proper from its earliest appear- 
ance to the end of the Hellenistic period. Ar- 
chaeological material will be covered primarily in 
relation to the major artistic monuments. Special 
topics will include the following: the 



disappearance of the Minoans, the physical evi- 
dence of the Trojan War, the religious sanctuar- 
ies of ancient Greece, Phidias and the High Clas- 
sical style at Athens. Kenneth Craig 

FA 327 (HS 314) Early Medieval Art in Ireland 
and Britain (F: 3) 

This seminar will examine the origins and devel- 
opment of art in Ireland and Britain in the Early 
Medieval period and the production of Irish and 
English missionaries on the Continent. Empha- 
sis will be placed on manuscripts, sculpture, and 
metal work of the sixth to the ninth century, on 
understanding works of art in their historical con- 
texts, and on their sources in the Celtic, Germanic 
and Mediterranean worlds. Students of art his- 
tory, history, medieval studies, and Irish studies 
are encouraged. Nancy Netzer 

FA 332 The Age of Leonardo, Michelangelo and 
Raphael (S: 3) 

The High Renaissance was of relatively brief du- 
ration, yet it attained a level of creative accom- 
plishment that served as a model for generations 
to come. The works of the leading masters of this 
era will be examined as well as their influence on 
subsequent artists. Josephine von Henneberg 

FA 342 Age of Rembrandt (S: 3) 

This course is about the golden age of painting 
in Holland. In the seventeenth century the pros- 
perous Dutch middle class became passionate art 
collectors. The artists living in the Netherlands 
responded by producing wonderful genre pic- 
tures, landscapes, still lifes and portraits as well as 
religious and mythological pictures for this, the 
first free market in the history of art. Among the 
artists we will study are Rembrandt, Jan Vermeer, 
and Frans Hals. Kenneth Craig 



32 • Graduate Arts and Scif.ncf.s • Fine Arts 



FA 355 From Gauguin to Dali: Late 19th and 
Early 20th Century Art (S: 3) 

This course begins with an examination of the 
diverse reactions of Impressionism in the 1880s, 
and then it proceeds to a discussion of art 
nouveau, sculptural trends around 1900, to the 
rise of Expressionism in France and Germany. 
The creation of Cubism, Italian Futurism, the 
evolution of abstract art are traced, and, finally, 
the anti-traditional currents from Dada to Sur- 
realism are analyzed. J e jf re y Howe 
FA 361 Issues In Contemporary Art (S: 3) 
This course looks at developments in art since 
1960, including pop art, minimalism, conceptual 
art, earthworks, performance and installation art, 
and public art. Among the topics to be discussed 
are the relationship between art and audience, 
between art and the art market, and artistic iden- 
tity and its relationship to ethnic and sexual iden- 
tity, the significance of the terms modernism and 
post-modernism, and the recent trends in liter- 
ary theory (such as post-structuralism and 
deconstruction). The course includes a bus trip 
to New York City. Re va Wolf 

FA 370 Native American Art (S: 3) 

A survey of indigenous American art from ancient 
times to the present covering the major groups 
from the North Pole to Patagonia. While look- 
ing at archeology and myth systems, the empha- 
sis will be on artistic themes and forms. 

G.Ted Bohr, S.J. 

FA 381 Propaganda Film (F: 3) 

From its very birth in 1895, the cinema has been 
used internationally as a celluloid weapon. This 
course provides, on one hand, an analysis of ap- 
proximately ten films and their parallel literary 
works of a socio-political nature to support this 
fact, and, on the other hand, the context of the 
myths that yields these films: Communism/anti- 
Communism, Fascism/anti-Fascism. 

John Michalczyk 

FA 384 History and Art History into Film 
(F, S: 3) 

This course will provide an introduction to the 
creation of authentic historical films. We will start 
with an exploration of the kinds of historical and 
art-historical sources that could be inspirational 
for scripting, and go on to look at the scripting 
process itself. Then students will be introduced 
to script breakdown, location scouting, produc- 
tion design and the making of production boards. 

Pamela Berger 

FA 392 The Museum of Art: History, Practice, 
Philosophy (S: 3) 

A study of the emergence of museums of art trac- 
ing their development from private and ecclesi- 
astical collections of the Middle Ages to their 
present form as public institutions. Topics include 
the function of the museum in its social context, 
the constituency of museums and their educa- 
tional mission, the role of the university versus the 
public museum, philosophy of installation and 
care of collections, current problems of adminis- 
tration and financing, museum architecture as a 
reflection of changes in function, the art market, 
and questions of authenticity of works of art. This 
course includes field trips to museums and 
collections. Nancy Netzer 



FA 394 Critical Writing on Art (F: 3) 

Essentially a writing workshop, the two primary 
goals of this course are to improve the students' 
skills in writing about art, and to provide a his- 
tory of art criticism from around 1750 to the 
present. Current writing on art in newspapers, 
periodicals and books are analyzed in class. 

Reva Wolf 

FA 401 Seminar in Art Historical Research (F: 3) 

The seminar acquaints the student with the bib- 
liography and research methods necessary for 
scholarly work in art history. The student pre- 
pares a substantial research paper under the di- 
rection of the professor and presents it to the class. 

Jejfrey Howe 

FA 403-404 Independent Work (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course may be offered from time to time to 
allow students to study a particular topic that is 
not included in the courses that are offered. 

The Department 

FA 430 Problems in Bosch and Bruegel 

A seminar on the two great masters of sixteenth 
century art in Northern Europe, Hieronymus 
Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Bosch's 
paintings, often perplexing and enigmatic, have 
been the focus of a wide spectrum of interpreta- 
tions, some of them outlandish and bizarre. 
Bruegel's pictures seem at first more genial, but 
when probed they brisde with social commentary. 
We will try to place the work of these two artists 
in the context of the turbulent era of the Refor- 
mation. Kenneth Craig 

FA 460 Contemporary Hispanic Art (S: 3) 

This is a survey of the painting, sculpture, and 
architecture of the Spanish speaking world in the 
twentieth century. The emphasis will be on dis- 
cerning unique Hispanic themes while recogniz- 
ing the dialogue with international art move- 
ments. G. Ted Bohr, S.J. 

Studio Art (Including Film and 
Photography) 

Note: A lab fee is charged in all studio 
courses. 

FS 301-302 Drawing IV: Figure; Drawing V: 
Figure (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 204 or permission of the instruc- 
tor 

The course uses the human figure to direct a 
student's development towards more expression 
and individualized drawing skills. In addition to 
working from the live model in class, the first se- 
mester includes anatomical studies, and the sec- 
ond semester stresses stylistic and spatial experi- 
mentation, seeing the figure as a component 
within a total composition. Lab fee required. 

Mary Sherman 

FS 323 Painting IV: Landscape (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 223-224 or permission of the in- 
structor 

Nature and landscape will provide us with 
painting imagery throughout the semester. Stu- 
dents will paint directly from the local landscape 
and die^e paintings will serve as source materials 
for large scale studio paindngs. This class is de- 
signed for advanced students who are familiar 
with the fundamentals of painting and wish to 



broaden and strengthen this foundation. Lab fee 
required. The Department 

FS 324 Painting V: Figure (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 223-224 or permission of the in- 
structor 

The objective of this advanced painting course 
is to introduce the student to the concept of ex- 
tracting and abstracting images from life, most 
notably from the figure. During the first portion 
of the semester, students will strengthen their 
observational and technical skills by painting di- 
rectly from the model. As the semester advances, 
students may incorporate additional figurative 
imagery culled from photographs and media im- 
agery into their paintings. At the conclusion of the 
semester the figure in the landscape may be in- 
troduced. It is assumed that students are working 
towards developing a personal vision upon enter- 
ing this class, and they will be free to work either 
representationally or abstractly. Lab fee required. 

The Department 

FS 344 Ceramics III— Vessels/Wheelthrowing 

(S:3) 

Emphasis is placed on the development of ideas 
pertaining to vessels/containers. This course cov- 
ers a range of issues from function to metaphor 
that allows for sculptural and painterly adapta- 
tions. The fundamentals of throwing on the 
potter's wheel along with various hand building 
and glaze techniques will be demonstrated 
through the semester. During the second semes- 
ter, specific projects are given which assist the 
student in developing throwing skills at an ad- 
vanced level and/or assist in the further develop- 
ment of other container ideas. Lab fee required. 

Mark Cooper 

FS 345, 346, 347, 348 Advanced Ceramics IV, 
V, VI, VII (F, S: 3) 

This is a ceramics course established to assist the 
individual in his or her aesthetic pursuits. The 
student may arrange class times on Wednesday or 
Thursday. Instruction will be given on an indi- 
vidual level appropriate to the student's previous 
ceramic experience. The student will be given a 
private space within the ceramic area. Along with 
developing an aesthetic, the student will be as- 
sisted in understanding and creating clays and 
glazes as well as kiln firing and construction. 
Lab fee required. Mark Cooper 

FS 385-386 Independent Work (F: 3-S: 3) 

A course allowing students who have sufficient 
background to progress to a higher level or in a 
more specialized area than other courses allow. 
The student works independently under the di- 
rection of a member of the Department. 

The Department 

FS 485-486 Independent Work (F: 3-S: 3) 

A course allowing students who have sufficient 
background to progress to a higher level or in a 
more specialized area than other courses allow. 
The student works independently under the di- 
rection of a member of the Department. 

The Department 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Geology and Geophysics • 33 



Geology and Geophysics 



FACULTY 

Emanuel G. Bombolakis, Professor; B.S., M.S., 
Colorado School of Mines; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

George D. Brown, Jr., Professor; B.S., Saint 
Joseph's College; M.S., University of Illinois; 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

John E. Ebel, Professor; A.B., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 

J. Christopher Hepburn, Professor; A.B., Colgate 
University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer, S.J., Associate 
Professor; A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., University 
of Southern California 

Rudolph Hon, Associate Professor; M.Sc, Charles 
University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Alan L. Kafka, Associate Professor; B.A., New York 
University; M.S., Ph.D., State University of New 
York at Stony Brook 

David C. Roy, Associate Professor; Chairperson of 
the Department; B.S., Iowa State University; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

txfcXsbo 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Master of Science Program 

The Department offers graduate courses and re- 
search programs leading to the M.S. degree in 
Geology or Geophysics. Although most students 
conduct research in either Geology or Geophys- 
ics, some combine the techniques of both disci- 
plines in studies of crystal structure below the sur- 
face. Many students seeking future employment 
in industry find that programs combining Geol- 
ogy with applied Geophysics are particularly at- 
tractive. 

The Department, with approximately 25 
graduate students in residence, is housed in 
Devlin Hall, and has additional research facilities 
at Weston Observatory. Students enjoy a close 
working relationship with faculty while being able 
to undertake research using the most modern sci- 
entific equipment available. The program stresses 
that the student obtains a strong background in 
the Earth Sciences and the ability to carry out 
research on his/her own. It is felt that the attain- 
ment of these qualities will enable students to be 
successful in their careers as geoscientists, 
whether they choose employment in industry, 
government service, or continue their studies to- 
ward a Ph.D. A particularly beneficial aspect of 
the M.S. program is the opportunity for students 
to integrate studies in Geology and Geophysics 
if they wish this type of background. Research in 
the Department covers a broad range of topics, 
including the following: Marine Geology, Coastal 
Sedimentation, Physical Sedimentation, Seismol- 
ogy (including crystal studies of New England 
using the 20-station New England Seismic 



Network), Geomagnetism, Structural Geology, 
Bryozoan Paleontology, Igneous and Metamor- 
phic Petrology, and Geochemistry (including 
Neutron Activation Trace Element analyses). 
Many of these various types of studies are being 
integrated by faculty and students to better un- 
derstand the geology, geophysics, and evolution 
of the Northern Appalachians. Government fel- 
lowships and grants are available to students. The 
Department also offers a number of Teaching and 
Research Assistantships to qualified students. 

Application 

Applicants to the Master of Science degree pro- 
gram generally fall into one of the following cat- 
egories: (1) students well-prepared in Geology or 
Geophysics with courses in mathematics, physics, 
chemistry, and/or biology who are interested in 
broadening their experience at the M.S. degree 
level before employment or doctoral studies else- 
where; (2) students well-prepared in mathemat- 
ics or one or more of the natural sciences other 
than Geology or Geophysics and who wish to use 
the M.S. degree program to transfer into the earth 
sciences. 

Applicants should submit, in addition to the 
normal application forms, transcripts, and letters 
of recommendation, a personal evaluation of the 
strengths and weaknesses of their undergraduate 
education (including course and non-course ex- 
perience), their graduate study interests and cur- 
rent post-degree plans. The Verbal, Quantitative, 
and Advanced test scores of the Graduate Record 
Exam (appropriate to the undergraduate major) 
are required. Applications may be made at any 
time. However, to be assured of consideration for 
September admission, they must be received by 
May 1. Applications from those applying for 
financial aid and assistantships for September 
need to be completed by February 1 5. 

Requirements 

No fixed curriculum is prescribed for the M.S. de- 
gree. Instead, a course and research program that 
is consistent with the student's background and 
professional objectives is developed by the student 
and his or her faculty advisory committee. The 
graduate program assumes a basic undergraduate 
foundation in the geo-sciences. Master's candi- 
dates in either Geology or Geophysics must com- 
plete or have completed two-semester (or equiva- 
lent) courses in calculus, physics, and chemistry. 
A minimum of 10 courses (numbered 300 or 
above), approved by the student's faculty advisory 
committee, must be completed in addition to a 
research thesis for graduation. A maximum of two 
required courses are allowed for the M.S. The- 
sis. Usually, no more than one Reading and Re- 
search course (GE 798, 799) may be applied to- 
ward the minimum course requirement. All stu- 
dents are required to maintain a B average in all 
Departmental courses as well as in all those un- 
dergraduate courses (0-299) in the other sciences 
and mathematics. A comprehensive oral exami- 
nation is required of each student. Three bound 



copies of the M.S. thesis are required upon 
completion of the research. 

Master of Science in Teaching 
Program 

The Department of Geology and Geophysics 
offers a program leading to the Master of Science 
in Teaching degree in cooperation with the 
Graduate School of Education. This program, 
which is designed for prospective teachers, ac- 
knowledges variations in prior background and 
skills and consists of three plans. For those can- 
didates without prior teaching experience, a 36- 
credit minimum M.S.T. degree program is re- 
quired, in which at least 5 courses are in the earth 
sciences, 5 courses in education and 6 credits are 
for supervised internship teaching. For experi- 
enced teachers, a 30-credit minimum M.S.T. 
degree program is required (since the internship 
is not necessary) of which at least 5 courses are in 
the earth sciences. The application procedures for 
the M.S.T. degree programs are the same as for 
the M.S. degree program. The application may 
be submitted either to the Graduate School of 
Education or the Department of Geology and 
Geophysics. However, prospective students must 
be accepted by the Graduate School of Education 
and the Department of Geology and Geophysics. 

Requirements for the M.S.T. Degree 

The five (5) required courses in the earth sciences 
must be chosen from among the following: 2 
courses from Introduction to Geology and Geo- 
physics I and II or Structural Geology I, and 1 
course from each of the following groups: (1) 
Mineralogy, Regional Stratigraphy, or Paleontol- 
ogy, (2) Meteorology, Oceanography, or As- 
tronomy, (3) Petrology I and II, Structural Geol- 
ogy I or II, Marine Geology, or Introduction to 
Geophysics. Students who have previously taken 
these courses may substitute other graduate 
courses within the Geology and Geophysics De- 
partment with approval. One semester of full- 
time residency may be necessary. A comprehen- 
sive examination is given to each student at the 
end of the program. This examination is in two 
parts; one part is oral in the Earth Sciences, and 
the other part is given by the Graduate School of 
Education. 

Cooperative Program 

The Department is part of a cooperative program 
with the Department of Geology at nearby Bos- 
ton University, as well as the Department of Civil 
Engineering at Tufts University. This program 
permits degree candidates at Boston College to 
enroll in courses that are unavailable at Boston 
College but are available at Boston University or 
Tufts. A list of these courses is available in the 
Departmental office. 

Weston Observatory 

Weston Observatory, formerly Weston College 
Seismic Station (1928-1949), is a part of the De- 
partment of Geology and Geophysics of Boston 
College. The Observatory, located 10 miles from 
the main campus, is an interdisciplinary research 



34 • Graduate Arts \nd Sciences • Geology and Geophysics 



facility of the Department and a center for re- 
search in the fields of geophysics and regional 
tectonics. Research by faculty, research associates, 
and students is directed primarily to seismology, 
geomagnetism and movements of the Earth's 
plates. Weston Observatory was one of the first 
participating facilities in the Worldwide Stan- 
dardized Seismograph Network and operates a 
twenty-station regional seismic network that 
records data on earthquakes in the Northeast, as 
well as distant earthquakes. The Observatory is 
also the headquarters of the New England 
Seismotectonic Study, a cooperative effort to de- 
termine the distribution and causes of New En- 
gland seismicity. A geomagnetic research facility, 
established at the Observatory in 1958, is instru- 
mented for the continuous recording of variations 
in the components of the earth's magnetic field. 
Regional geologic and plate tectonic model- 
ing studies are chiefly concerned with the origin 
and evolution of the Northern Appalachian 
Mountains of the United States and Maritime 
Canada and their relation to similar rock se- 
quences in Ireland, the British Isles, western Eu- 
rope and Africa. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

An asterisk (*) after a course indicates that the 
course carries a laboratory fee. 

For undergraduate courses numbered below 
300 consult the Undergraduate Catalog. 

GE 302 Geochemistry 

Prerequisites: College Chemistry, GE 200, or 
equivalent 

An introduction to fundamentals of geo- 
chemical processes and how they influence distri- 
bution of elements in the natural environment. 
The subjects to be discussed will include nucleo- 
synthesis, isotope geology, water chemistry and 
chemical changes during formation of sedimen- 
tary, metamorphic and igneous rocks. Not offered 
1994-1995 Rudolph Hon 

GE 325 Geologic Computing and Computer 
Graphing 

The focus of this course is on applications of desk- 
top workstations to solutions of problems in earth 
science disciplines. Solution strategies will include 
effective data management, data processing, sta- 
tistical analysis and graphical analysis. Not offered 
1994-1995 Rudolph Hon 

GE 330 Principles of Paleontology 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134 or equivalent, or per- 
mission of the instructor 

This is an introduction to the study of animal 
life of the past. Consideration is given to the con- 
cept of species, especially the problems of tax- 
onomy of individuals and of populations. Living 
representatives of the various phyla are compared 
with fossil forms to offer evidence regarding mode 
of life, evolutionary development, and ecological 
environment. Not offered 1994-1995 

The companion laboratory, GE 331, must be 
taken concurrently. George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 331 Principles of Paleontology Laboratory* 

Corequisite: Taken in conjunction with GE 330 

This two-hour weekly laboratory course will 
introduce students to a practical study of fossils. 
Key structures of the principal fossil invertebrate 



phyla will be studied to enable the student to iden- 
tify and assign known and unknown fossil mate- 
rial. Not offered 1994-1995 

GE 345 Human Evolution and Paleontology 

Prerequisite: GE 1 90 or instructor approval 

This is a seminar on human evolution beyond 
the introductory level. Five topics will be covered: 
the Genus Homo and direct ancestors; life; Dar- 
winian evolution; and three to be selected in con- 
sultation with the class. Not offered 1994-1995 

George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 350 Regional Geology of North America 

(F:3) 

Prerequisites: GE 1 32-1 34, 264 or equivalent 

This is a systematic investigation of the physi- 
ography, stratigraphy, structural geology, petrol- 
ogy, and distribution of the major geological 
provinces of North America. 

George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 385 Structural Geology II, Analytical 
Aspects* (S: 4) 

Prerequisites: GE 132 and 134 or equivalent, one 
year of college calculus, PH 21 1 or equivalent 

A history of the development of structural ge- 
ology will be presented during the first several 
lectures. Then quantitative mechanisms of frac- 
ture, faulting, and igneous intrusions will be 
treated, illustrating their relation to problems in 
tectonics. One additional two-hour problem ses- 
sion laboratory per week. E.G. Bombolakis 

R.J. Martin 111 

GE 391 Introduction to Geophysics 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134; MT 200-201; PH 
211-212 

This is an introduction to the methods of ob- 
servation and interpretation of geophysical phe- 
nomena. Topics include seismology, gravity and 
magnetic fields, age determinations, heat flow, 
and tectonic forces. Not offered 1994-95 

The Department 

GE 395 Ground Water Hydrology I (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 134, 200, Chemistry 110, MT 
101 or 103, or equivalents 

This course is an overview of ground-water 
hydrology with emphasis on concepts and prin- 
ciples, and their application to practical problem 
solving. The course is intended to provide a foun- 
dation for further in-depth water resources stud- 
ies, and an orientation for active professionals 
wishing to broaden their working knowledge and 
understanding of ground water hydrology. 

The Department 

GE 450-452 Exploration Geophysics I and II 
(F: 4-S: 4) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, MT 200-201 or MT 204, 
PH211-212 

This is a practical course in geophysical explo- 
ration methods; the emphasis is on applications 
to petroleum, hydrological, and mineral explora- 
tion and Geotechnical Engineering work. Part I 
covers seismic refraction and reflection methods 
and emphasizes modern techniques and applica- 
tions. Part II covers gravity, magnetic, and elec- 
trical methods and their theory, instrumentation, 
data reduction, and interpretation. Second semes- 
ter may be taken without first semester by permis- 
sion of instructor. GE 450 is not offered in 
1994-95 John F. Devane, S.J. 

John E. Ebel 



GE 460 Modern and Ancient Sedimentary 
Environments 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, 200, 264, or equivalent 
The course consists of examining the basis for 
interpreting sedimentary deposits in terms of pro- 
cesses, environments of deposition, succession of 
strata and sedimentary tectonics. The deposi- 
tional environments to be studied will include 
deserts, rivers, lakes, glaciers, coasts (deltas, 
beaches), and marine (coral reefs, continental 
shelf and pelagic deposits). Not offered 1994-95 
Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 
George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 484 Chemistry of Natural Water Systems 

Prerequisites: College level of introductory chem- 
istry and calculus 

Natural water systems consist of surface and 
subsurface water reservoirs that are in a constant 
process of chemical interaction with their sur- 
roundings. Understanding of these processes (i.e., 
dissolution and precipitation) of various chemi- 
cal species will be presented from the standpoint 
of equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermody- 
namics of water-rock systems. Rudolph Hon 

GE 500 Potential Field Theory 

Prerequisites: MT 202 , PH 2 1 1 -2 1 2 

This course is an introduction to the math- 
ematics of potential fields that is used to describe 
such geophysical phenomena as the earth's gravi- 
tational and magnetic fields. The vector theorems 
of Gauss, Stokes and Green are presented, and 
potential methods of solving Laplace, Poisson, 
diffusion and wave equations under appropriate 
geophysical conditions are presented. Applica- 
tions of these theories are made to practical 
problems in geophysics. John Devane, S.J. 

GE 505 Micropaleontology 

Prerequisite: GE 330 

This course is an introduction to the study of 
very small but geologically important taxa of the 
plant and animal kingdoms. Groups studied will 
include the Foraminifera, Ostracoda, Conodonts, 
Bryozoa, and Diatoms. Three hours of lecture and 
one laboratory per week. Not offered 1994-95 

George D. Brown, Jr. 

GE 510 Internship and Seminar in 
Environmental Geosciences (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

This seminar is provided for qualified upper- 
division undergraduates and graduate students 
serving as interns in industry, in government, or 
in non-profit organizations during the semester 
or the previous summer. The subject of the 
project and the activities of the internship must 
be approved in advance by the instructor prior to 
enrollment, and a final report or other suitable 
documentation of the results of the internship will 
be due at the end of the semester. Students will 
meet, at least every other week, with the instruc- 
tor and other interns to report on the nature and 
progress of their intern activities. Internships will 
be sought by the Department but suitable intern- 
ships obtained by students may be submitted to 
the instructor for approval. In some semesters the 
seminar may involve a group project on some 
environmental topic suggested by an outside or- 
ganization or developed by the instructor. Not 
offered 1 994-95 Charles M. Spooner 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Geology and Geophysics 



35 



GE 520 Sedimentary Petrology 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, 264, 272 

The petrography and origin of the major sedi- 
mentary rock types will be emphasized. The use 
of mineral and chemical composition together 
with textural and sedimentary analyses to under- 
stand the production of sediment, sedimentary 
provenance and depositional environments will be 
explored. Not offered 1 994-95 David C. Roy 

GE 525 Theory of Mineral Equilibria 

Prerequisites: Integral and differential Calculus, In- 
organic Chemistry; some knowledge of Thermo- 
dynamics is desirable. 

The course consists of two interrelated parts. 
The first part will examine basic principles of ther- 
modynamics; (1st, 2nd, and 3rd law of thermo- 
dynamics) and the theory of solution and equilib- 
ria in the chemical system using geological ex- 
amples. During the second part of the course we 
will apply these principles to metamorphic reac- 
tions and silicate melt crystal phase equilibria. 
Special emphasis will be given to applied 
geothermometry and geobarometry. Not offered 
1994-95 Rudolph Hon 

GE 526 Igneous Petrology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 272, 525 or equivalent 

The origin arid evolution of molten silicate- 
solid rock systems are reviewed in the light of 
chemical, experimental, and petrographic evi- 
dence. Principles of phase equilibria, liquid-solid- 
vapor intepctions, sources of thermal energy and 
their relation to tectonic environments, rheologi- 
cal properties of solid, semi-solid, and liquid rock 
states, classification and tectonic interpretation, 
major and trace element geochemistry are among 
the many topics discussed in this course. Not of- 
fered 1 994-95 Rudolph Hon 

GE 528 Metamorphic Petrology 

Prerequisites: GE 272 or equivalent 

This course examines the nature and origin of 
rocks that formed by metamorphism of pre-ex- 
isting rocks. Topics will include the interpreta- 
tion of mineral assemblages, their phase relations, 
and the pressure-temperature regimes of meta- 
morphism. Not offered 1994-95 

J. Christopher Hepburn 

GE 530 Marine Geology (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, 272 

Recent geological, geophysical and geochemi- 
cal information on the ocean basins is examined. 
Emphases are placed on modern sedimentation 
and deformation dynamics, and ocean basin his- 
tory revealed by cored and dredged sediments and 
igneous rocks, together with seismologic, gravity, 
heat flow, and magnetic data. 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

GE 531 Applications of Geology to 
Environmental and Engineering Projects (S: 3) 

This seminar is an introduction to geologic as- 
pects of soils and bedrock that are relevant to, and 
required for, the successful pursuit of environ- 
mental and engineering projects. Hands-on expe- 
rience and/or case studies will include geologic 
mapping, data collection and analysis; planning of 
drilling and geophysical investigations in a vari- 
ety of conditions, analysis and presentation of 
data, and preparation of reports. Guest lecturers 
will provide case study examples. 

James W. Skeehan, S.J. 



GE 539 Coastal Geology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, MT 200-201 or MT 
204, PH 211 

This course reviews the processes of deposi- 
tion and erosion of the world's coastline. Topics 
to be considered are classification of shorelines, 
sea level changes, beach, paludal, deltaic, evapor- 
ite and carbonate environments. Special attention 
is given to shallow water hydrodynamics. 

Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

GE 543 Plate Tectonics and Mountain Belts 

(F:3) 

Prerequisites: GE 285 and GE 272 

The idea that the surface of the earth is not 
fixed but moves in response to convection cur- 
rents in the asthenosphere has revolutionized 
geology. While a great deal is known about Plate 
Tectonics, the full implications of this theory are 
subject to much current research and debate that 
will certainly continue to be a focus of geological 
thought well into the future. A particular empha- 
sis will be on the use of Plate Tectonic processes 
in the interpretation of the origin of mountain 
belts and other large-scale geological structures. 
Both modern and ancient examples will be dis- 
cussed as will current ideas for the analysis of ex- 
otic terrains. J. Christopher Hepburn 

GE 547 Advanced Structural Geology 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructors 

The course begins with an introduction to 
deformation of the lithosphere, culminating in a 
comparison of the North American Cordillera 
with the Appalachians. This comparison involves 
the principles of deformation of materials and the 
analyses of stress and strain, in order to analyze 
stress-strain and stress-strain-time behavior of the 
lithosphere. Initially, the subsidence of continen- 
tal margins, subsidence due to extension and sub- 
sidence due to sedimentation in basins are treated 
in introductory quantitative terms. Then defor- 
mation mechanisms such as elasticity, thermal 
expansion, plastic deformation, pressure solution, 
and compaction are incorporated into the analy- 
sis of faults, faulting processes, folds, folding pro- 
cesses, including the development of several types 
of intrusive structures. Three hours of lecture per 
week. Nor offered 1994-95 E.G. Bombolakis 

R.J. Martin III 

GE 550 Geostatistics 

Prerequisites: GE 115, 125 or equivalents; Com- 
puter Programming recommended 

This course is a practical approach to statisti- 
cal and probabilistic procedures for the acquisi- 
tion, analysis and interpretation of geologic and 
ecologic data. It is an introduction to mathemati- 
cal models of gaussian and non-normal popula- 
tions. Both single-variable and multivariable 
problems will be considered. Not offered 1994-95 
Benno M. Brenninkmeyer 

GE 572 Geophysical Data Processing (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 391, Computer Programming 
The techniques of convolution, correlation 
and spectral analysis are applied to seismic, mag- 
netic and gravity data, with emphasis on the 
theory and construction of two-dimensional 
filters in the interpretation of geophysical data. 

Alan Kafka 



GE 595 Groundwater Hydrology II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: GE 395 

The course covers the following: (1) theory of 
ground water flow; aquifer properties and defini- 
tions; Darcy's law; definitions of elevation and 
pressure heads; steady and unsteady one and two- 
dimensional flow; (2) well and aquifer relation- 
ships; flow to wells; discharge and drawdown re- 
lationships; well efficiency, etc.; (3) analysis of 
discharging wells and other test data; steady state 
and transient equations; type curve solutions; re- 
covery analysis and leaky aquifer solutions; and (4) 
methods used in determining aquifer character- 
istics. Alfredo Urzua 

GE 610 Physical Sedimentation (F: 4) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, 264, 272; MT 100- 
101;PH211 

This course is a study of the physical dynam- 
ics of erosion, transport, and deposition of par- 
ticulate materials in fluid media. Experimental 
and empirical data on both channelized and 
nonchannelized flow systems will be examined. 
Special attention will be given to sedimentary 
structures and their hydrodynamic interpreta- 
tions. Laboratory GE 61 1 required. 

David C. Roy 

GE 61 1 Physical Sedimentation Laboratory 

Experiments that illustrate sediment transport 
mechanisms and the development of sedimentary 
features in sandstone beds are performed using 
recirculating flumes. Not offered 1994-95 

David C. Roy 

GE 635 Groundwater Modeling 

Prerequisites: Knowledge of 2nd year Calculus, 
Introductory Physics, Fortran (or any other com- 
puter language), and some experience with an 
IBM personal computer 

Some topics of this lecture course that will be 
covered include a review of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of ground water flow; finite difference 
method as applied to steady state and transient 
flow problems; and introduction to the finite ele- 
ment method as applied to steady state and tran- 
sient flow problems. Microcomputer versions of 
MODFLOW, AQUIFEM and FLOWNET are 
introduced. Not offered 1994-95 Alfredo Urzua 

GE 640 Geomechanics 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor 

The principles of rock deformation will be 
emphasized with applications to plate tectonics, 
structural geology and case history problems en- 
countered in the field of engineering geology of 
rock masses. Not offered 1994-95 

E.G. Bombolakis 

GE 660 Introduction to Seismology 

Prerequisites: GE 1 34 or equivalent, MT 200-201 
or MT 204 (may be taken concurrently) 

A basic course in seismology, including seis- 
mograph calibration, ray theory, body and surface 
waves, location, magnitude and intensity. Also 
discussed are seismicity, energy release, focal 
mechanisms, and fault-plane solutions. Not offered 
1994-95 JohnKEbel 

GE 661 Theoretical Seismology 

Prerequisites: PH 480, GE 660 or equivalent 

This is an advanced course in seismology. 
Elasticity and development of the wave equations, 



36 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • History 



reflection and refraction, energy partitioning, 
inversion of body wave data and dislocation 
theory of earthquakes are included. Not offered 
1994-95 Alan Kafka 

GE 662 Geomagnetism 

Prerequisites: GE 391, GE 500 

This course includes an analysis of the Earth's 
magnetic field in space and time. Included are the 
origin of the field; secular variation; magnetic 
storms; micropulsations; electrical conductivity of 
the Earth; paleomagnetism and its relationship to 
theories of global tectonics. Not offered 1994-95 

John F. Devane, S.J. 

GE 663 Gravity Fields 

Prerequisites: PH 480 or equivalent 

This course includes the following: derivation 
of theoretical gravity formulas, geoidal heights, 
anomalistic gravity reductions, two-and three- 
dimensional modeling, and satellite geodesy. Not 
offered 1994-95 The Department 

GE 668 Inverse Theory in Geophysics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 305, Programming Experience 
in FORTRAN or C 

The theory of the linear and non-linear inver- 
sion of data for model parameters and its appli- 
cation to various problems in geophysics is pre- 
sented. Theories such as the generalized inverse, 
the stochastic inverse, and the maximum likeli- 
hood inverse are developed. The theory and prac- 
tical application of non-linear inversion are dis- 
cussed. John E. Ebel 

GE 672 Physics of the Earth 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

An advanced seminar course covering topics 
related to the physics behind plate tectonics. 
Topics include crystal deformation properties, the 
gravitational seismic and thermal structures of the 
earth, mantle convection and the driving forces 
of plate tectonics are covered. Not offered 
1994-95 John E. Ebel 

GE 680 Geotec tonics 

This is a combined lecture and laboratory course 
dealing with structural and tectonic features re- 
sulting from the interaction of plate motion and 
the development of mountain belts. The struc- 
tural and tectonic features will include several of 
prime interest in the oil industry, such as fault- 
propagation folds and faults. Not offered 1994-95 

E.G. Bofnbolakis 
R.J. Martin III 



GE 690 Tectonics of the Appalachian Orogen 
and Related Terrains 

Prerequisites: GE 285, 290, 526, 528 

The most significant literature on the nearly 
one billion year evolution of the component ter- 
rains that now comprise this Circum-Atlantic 
mountain system will be reviewed and analyzed. 
Stratigraphic, structural, petrologic and related 
geophysical, geochemical, and paleontological 
parameters important for holistic tectonic recon- 
structions will be emphasized. Not offered 1994- 
95 James W. Skehan, S.J. 

GE 790 Seminar in Environmental Geology: 
Fractured Bedrock Aquifers (F: 3) 

The source of water for municipalities and pri- 
vate residences in much of the country is obtained 
from fractured bedrock. These water supplies, 
particularly in the Northeast, are in danger. Con- 
taminants from industrial sources seep through 
the overburden and into fractured bedrock aqui- 
fers. In this course we will discuss topics pertain- 
ing to the quantification and description of frac- 
tured bedrock aquifers. As an integral part of the 
analysis, the formation of fractured and jointed 
networks with the rock will be investigated. The 
effect of depth on the permeability and transport 
properties of the aquifer will be considered in 
detail. Case studies will be analyzed to illustrate 
ways in which transport of contaminants in frac- 
tured media are commonplace. Remediation 
techniques for cleaning up these bedrock aquifers 
will be presented. E.G. Boinbolakis 

R.J. Martin III 

GE 792 Applications of the Geographical 
Information System (ARC/INFO) (S: 3) 

Geographical Information System (GIS) is an 
integrated software environment that has two 
parts: information handling (data management) 
for both information organization and retrieval, 
and a second part that allows visual display of data 
in a graphical form on a map (geographical coor- 
dinate system). This course is designed to give 
students a working knowledge and a practical 
experience in applying computers in their stud- 
ies and/or research. Many of the assignments will 
use maps. Complementing the introduction and 
overview will be in-depth training using graph- 
ics, workstations, and terminals. 

Michael Terner 



GE 793 Seminar in Environmental Geoscience: 
The Geotechnical Bases for Governmental 
Policies and Regulations (S: 3) 

Through guest lecturers, expert in their regula- 
tory and technical fields, this course will examine 
policy and scientific issues concerning the qual- 
ity of the environment. Topics will include the 
Clean Air Act and air quality measurements; the 
Safe Drinking Water Act and water resource pro- 
tection; the Toxic Substance Control Act and 
health effects from environmental pollutants; and 
the disposal of hazardous and solid wastes. 

Charles M. Spooner 

GE 794 and 796 Seminar in Geology (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is an analysis and discussion of top- 
ics of current interest in geology. 

The Department 

GE 795 and 797 Seminar in Geophysics 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is an analysis and discussion of prob- 
lems of current interest in geophysics. 

The Department 

GE 798 Reading and Research in Geophysics 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Included is a study of some problem or area of 
knowledge in geophysics. The Department 

GE 799 Reading and Research in Geology 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a study of some problem or area of knowl- 
edge in geology. The Department 

GE 801 Thesis Seminar (F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a thesis research course under the guid- 
ance of a faculty member. The Department 

GE 802 Thesis Direction (F: 0-S: 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their thesis. This course must be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 

GE 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 



History 



FACULTY 

Thomas H. O'Connor, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Boston University 

Andrew Buni, Professor; A.B., A.M., University 
of New Hampshire; Ph.D., University ofVirginia 

James E. Cronin, Professor; Chairperson of the 
Department; B.A., Boston College; M.A., 
Northeastern University; Ph.D., Brandeis 
University 



Radu R. Florescu, Professor; A.B., A.M., B.Litt., 
Oxford University; Ph.D., Indiana University 

John L. Heineman, Professor; A.B., University of 
Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Raymond T. McNally, Professor; A.B., Fordham 
University; Ph.D., Free University of Berlin 

David A. Northrup, Professor; B.S., M.A., 
Fordham University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 



Alan Reinerman, Professor; B.S., A.M., Xavier 
University; Ph.D., Loyola University 

Peter H. Weiler, Professor; A.B., Stanford 
University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard Unversity 

Silas H. L. Wu, Professor; A.B., National Taiwan 
University; A.B., University of California at 
Berkeley; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., 
Columbia University 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • History • 37 



Benjamin Braude, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Paul Breines, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Robin Fleming, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara 

Ellen G. Friedman, Associate Professor; B.A., New 
York University; Ph.D., C.U.N.Y. Grad School 

Mark I. Gelfand, Associate Professor; A.B., City 
College of New York; A.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

R. Alan Lawson, Associate Professor; A.B., Brown 
University; A.M., University ofWisconsin; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan 

Roberta Manning, Associate Professor; A.B., Rice 
College; A.M., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Rev. Francis J. Murphy, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Holy Cross; A.M., Ph.D., Catholic University 

Kevin O'Neill, Associate Professor; A. B ., Marquette 
University; A.M., Loyola University; Ph.D., 
Brown University 

Thomas W.Perry, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Carol M. Petillo, Associate Professor; Director of 
Graduate Studies; A.B., Montclair State College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Virginia Reinburg, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Georgetown University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 
University 

Alan Rogers, Associate P?vfessor; A.B., M.A. , Ph.D., 
University of California, Santa Barbara 

John H. Rosser, Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of Maryland; A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers 
University 

Paul G. Spagnoli, Associate Professor; A.B., Holy 
Cross; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Frank Fonda Taylor, Associate Professor; B.A., 
M.A., University of West Indies; Ph.D., 
University of Geneva 

L. Scott Van Doren, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Oberlin College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Lawrence Wo\ff,Associate Professor; A.B., Harvard 
College; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Sherri Broder, Assistant Professor; B.A., Hamp- 
shire College; M.A., State University of New 
York at Binghamton; Ph.D., Brown University 

Karen Miller, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., 
University of California at San Diego; Ph.D., 
University of California at Santa Barbara 

Mrinalini Sinha, Assistant Professor; M.A., 
Jawahawlal Nehru University; M.A., Ph.D., 
S.U.N.Y. 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are offered with 
concentrations in Medieval History, Early Mod- 
ern European History, Modern European His- 
tory, American History, and Latin American His- 
tory. The Department also offers work in African 



History, Middle Eastern History, and Asian His- 
tory. 

The Department sponsors interdisciplinary 
work leading to Master's degrees in American 
Studies, in European National Studies and in 
Medieval Studies. A Master of Arts in Teaching 
(M.A.T.) program for secondary school history 
teachers is administered by the Graduate School 
of Education. 

Master of Arts Programs 

Require?nents: The M.A. degree requires 30 gradu- 
ate credits, a distribution requirement for each 
particular program and an oral comprehensive 
examination. The one exception to this is the 
European National Studies Program, which re- 
quires 36 credits. 

Students are not allowed to complete the M.A. 
program by attending only summer sessions but 
are required to take a total of at least four courses 
(12 credits) during the regular academic year. 

The Master of Arts in History 

All candidates for the M.A. in History are encour- 
aged to pursue an individual course of study, de- 
veloped in conjunction with a faculty advisor, se- 
lected by the student during the first year in the 
program. In making their selection of courses and 
seminars, students are urged to widen their chro- 
nological and cultural horizons while deepening 
and specifying one special area of concentration. 
Considering these criteria, students are advised 
usually to select and complete 1 8 hours in a ma- 
jor area and 12 hours in a minor area. Available 
as major or minor areas are American History, 
Medieval History, Early Modern European His- 
tory, Modern European History, (encompassing 
English, Irish, Continental European, East Eu- 
ropean, and Russian History) and Latin Ameri- 
can History. Other minor areas available are Af- 
rican, Middle Eastern, and Asian History. 

Students whose prior academic preparation is 
sufficient to warrant an exception be made to the 
above requirements may, with the consent of their 
advisor, ask the Department permission to sub- 
stitute a different proportion or variety of courses 
and areas than those generally required. The op- 
portunity for study in a major or minor area is 
open to the extent that the Department offers suf- 
ficient course work in the student's area of inter- 
est. 

The possibility of study in departments out- 
side History exists, and with the permission of the 
Graduate Committee of the Department, a can- 
didate whose advisor so recommends may earn as 
many as six credits in Classics, Economics, En- 
glish, Political Science, Sociology or other related 
disciplines. Graduate credits earned in a related 
discipline will be included in the distribution re- 
quirements for the appropriate area. 

In addition to the general requirements for the 
M.A. degree, students in the History program are 
required to complete a seminar in their major 
area. They must also pass a foreign language read- 
ing examination, ordinarily in French, German, 
Russian, or Spanish. Another foreign language, 
when relevant to the research of the student, may 
be substituted with permission of the Graduate 
Committee of the Department. Students also take 
an oral comprehensive examination, administered 
by the student's advisor and two additional faculty 



members, one from the major area and one from 
the minor. 

Students may complete the Master's degree 
with or without a thesis. Those wishing to write 
a thesis should complete all of the other require- 
ments for the degree and request permission. The 
thesis counts for six credits through HS 801 and 
must be approved by the candidate's major 
advisor. 

The Master of Arts in American Studies 

American Studies is designed to develop an un- 
derstanding of the American experience by bring- 
ing the student to an integrated holistic engage- 
ment with American culture. The program is ex- 
tensive in that it allows the student to work in a 
number of different disciplines and intensive in 
that the techniques and information that he or she 
learns from them are focused upon particular 
problems in American culture. 

American Studies at Boston College is an in- 
terdepartmental program leading to the Master 
of Arts degree. Participating in the program are 
the Departments of History, English, Sociology, 
Economics and Political Science. The program is 
administered by a committee composed of rep- 
resentatives from each of the cooperating depart- 
ments. A two-semester core course required of all 
American Studies candidates seeks to bring the 
broad range of interests of the cooperating depart- 
ments to bear on American culture in order to 
show how a good interdisciplinarian would attack 
themes, problems, and issues, in a chosen field. 

Requirements: Candidates for the M.A. in 
American Studies will concentrate in one of the 
cooperating departments. In addition to 6 hours 
for the core course, all students will be expected 
to earn 12 hours in their field of major concen- 
tration, 9 hours in a field or fields related to their 
major interest, and 3 hours for one additional 
research seminar. 

The candidates will take an oral comprehen- 
sive examination that will be tailored to reflect 
their capacity to synthesize diverse areas of knowl- 
edge and will focus on their major interest. The 
examining board should consist of at least one 
member of the American Studies committee. 

An applicant for admission to the American 
Studies program should submit an application to 
the department of desired major concentration. 
Admission of any applicant will be determined 
both by the major department and by the Ameri- 
can Studies committee. 

European National Studies 

The M.A. in History is also offered in a program 
on the history and language of a single European 
nation. At present, programs are offered in Brit- 
ish, French, German, Irish, Russian, and Spanish 
studies. Except as noted below, students in Eu- 
ropean National Studies must complete 36 cred- 
its of approved courses and pass an oral compre- 
hensive examination. 

At least 18 credits must be in history, of which 
at least 6 credits should be in general European 
surveys (including one colloquium), and at least 
9 credits in the history of one European nation- 
ality (including a seminar in which that national 
language is used for research). Except for those 
in British and Irish studies, students must com- 
plete at least 12 credits in appropriate foreign 



38 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • History 



language and literature courses, and receive a high 
pass on a written examination in that language. 
Students with sufficient background to enter lan- 
guage courses at the intermediate level or above 
may be permitted to take only 6 credits of course 
work in language and literature courses and be 
exempted from 6 credits of work toward the de- 
gree. 

Students in Irish studies must, in addition to 
30 credits in history, Irish literature, and other rel- 
evant disciplines, take 6 credits in beginning Irish 
Gaelic. Students in British studies must take a 
total of 30 credits in history, English literature, 
and other appropriate courses, and fulfill the 
Department's usual foreign language require- 
ment. 

Medieval Studies 

The Department of History offers an opportunity 
in Medieval Studies for students planning to pur- 
sue advanced studies in the medieval field at Bos- 
ton College or at other institutions. Students in- 
terested in this course of study will be expected 
to take at least nine hours in Medieval History and 
at least six hours of graduate study in one of the 
related areas. The attention of History majors is 
directed to courses in medieval subjects offered 
by other departments. If the student is doing a 
thesis it will be written under the direction of a 
member of the History Department and will be 
read by a member of the department in the related 
field of study. In addition to the language require- 
ments of the Department, the candidate will be 
expected to know Latin. All other requirements 
for the M.A. degree will remain in effect. 

Doctor of Philosophy in History 

The Ph.D. is a research degree and requires spe- 
cial commitment and skills. While the degree is 
not granted for routine fulfillment of certain regu- 
lations, nor for the successful completion of a 
specified number of courses, there are certain 
basic requirements. These may, however, be 
modified as individual circumstances warrant. 

• Course and Residency Requirements: Students 
entering directly into the Ph.D. program are re- 
quired to complete 42 credits, 36 of which are to 
be earned prior to taking comprehensive exams. 
The last six credits are to be earned by taking the 
Dissertation Seminar (3 credits) and readings and 
research (3 credits) directed toward the disserta- 
tion with the major professor. All students in the 
Ph.D. program are required to pursue two semes- 
ters of full-time study during the first year and 
must, in the course of their studies, complete at 
least two seminars (one of which may be the Dis- 
sertation Seminar), and at least two colloquia (one 
in the major and one in a minor area). 

• Faculty Advisor: During the first semester of 
full-time study, the doctoral student will pick a 
faculty advisor, who will oversee the student's 
progress in preparing for comprehensive exams 
and in developing a dissertation topic. 

• Plan of Study: By the conclusion of the first 
semester, and after full consultation with the ad- 
visor and the Director of Graduate Studies, the 
student shall file a plan of study leading to the 
comprehensive examination. This plan of study 
will consist of three areas of concentration (as 
follows). One of these areas will be designated as 
the major area. From within this major area, the 



FIELDS OF STUDY IN THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM 



AREA 

American History 



Medieval History 



Early Modern 
European History 



Modern European 
History 



Russian and Eastern 
European History 



Latin American 
History 



Other Areas 

{Minor only) 



FIELDS 

American History to 1789 
American History, 1789-1877 
American History, 1 865 to present 
American Intellectual History 
American Social History 
American Urban History 
American Racial and Ethnic History 
American Diplomatic History 
American Women's History 

Medieval Social and Economic History 
Medieval Cultural and Religious History 
Medieval Political History 

Renaissance Europe 

Reformation and Counter-Reformation 

Europe in the 17th and 1 8th Centuries 

Early Modern Social and Economic History 

England in the 1 8th century 

Early Modern French History 

Early Modern Spanish History 

Modern Europe, 1789-1914 

Modern Europe, 1870-1945 

Contemporary Europe 

Modern European Intellectual History 

Modern European Social and Economic History 

Modern European Diplomatic History 

British History since 1815 

German History since 1 789 

French History since 1 789 

Irish History since 1789 

Italian History sincel789 

Eastern Europe since 1 789 

European Imperialism 

Pre-Revolutionary Russian History 
Soviet History 

Eastern Europe before 1 789 
Eastern Europe since 1 789 

Colonial Latin American History 
Modern Latin American History 
Central American/Caribbean History 
South American History 
Mexican History 

History of China 
African History 
Middle Eastern History 
Ancient History 
History of India 



student shall choose two fields of study. Because 
the student will be expected to develop a mature 
understanding of this major area as a whole, one 
of these two major fields should be general in na- 
ture. The student shall then select one field of 
study from each of two additional areas of con- 
centration. Usually, faculty will require that stu- 
dents take at least some formal course work in 
each field and will expect students to develop and 
master a reading list of important books and ar- 
ticles that has been agreed to by the student. With 
the approval of the advisor and the Director of 



Graduate Studies, the student may offer, as one 
of the two minor areas, a discipline related to 
history or a topic within that cuts across tradi- 
tional geographical or chronological boundaries. 
When considered necessary to the student's pro- 
gram, the department may require advanced-level 
work in a related discipline either as a minor field 
or as supplemental work. This plan of study may 
be reviewed, evaluated, and revised whenever nec- 
essary. Changes, however, must be approved by 
the advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • History • 39 



• Areas and Fields: The areas and fields a stu- 
dent may choose to study have been listed previ- 
ously. 

Substitution of other areas of study must be 
approved by the Graduate Committee of the 
Department. Approval will be based upon the 
availability of appropriate faculty at Boston 
College or at the schools involved in the Consor- 
tium program — Brandeis University, Boston 
University, and Tufts University. 

• Language Requirements: The student must 
demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least two 
foreign languages, usually French, German, 
Russian or Spanish. Substitution of another 
foreign language may be permitted upon recom- 
mendation of the student's advisor and with the 
approval of the Director of Graduate Studies. The 
language requirement must be fulfilled prior to 
taking comprehensive examinations. 

Students who select Medieval History as their 
major area must pass an additional qualifying ex- 
amination in Latin (and/or Greek for Byzantine 
History), before taking the comprehensive exami- 
nation. Students concentrating in American His- 
tory may substitute competency in a field of par- 
ticular methodological or theoretical relevance to 
their program of study for competency in a sec- 
ond foreign language. To do so, students must 
petition the Graduate Committee for the substi- 
tution, explaining the nature of the field and its 
importance to the plan of study, particularly the 
dissertation. It will be the responsibility of the 
student's major professor to assess and certify that 
the student has acquired the appropriate skills and 
knowledge. 

• The Comprehensive Examination: The 
student's oral comprehensive examination will be 
conducted by an examining board composed of 
four faculty members, two from the student's 
major area, and one each from the two minor ar- 
eas. A written examination may be required at die 
joint discretion of the student and the student's 
committee. 

The comprehensive examination is not 
restricted to the content of graduate courses but 
will be more general in nature. While it is ex- 
pected that the student will have, by the time of 
the examination, a thorough grasp of the signifi- 
cant historiography in the three areas of study, the 
examination itself is more direcdy concerned with 
the maturity of the student's comprehension and 
with the ability to analyze, interpret, and evalu- 
ate. 

• The Dissertation: Students are encouraged to 
develop a dissertation topic even before taking and 
passing comprehensive exams. The last six cred- 
its earned for the degree should be focused explic- 
idy on the dissertation, however. These should in- 
clude the Dissertation Seminar and independent 
research with the major advisor. Ordinarily, these 
will be done after students have taken comprehen- 
sive exams. Dissertation proposals must be ap- 
proved by the faculty advisor, who serves as its 
director, and by the Graduate Committee of the 
Department, and should be completed by the end 
of the semester following the passing of compre- 
hensive exams. The dissertation itself must be 
approved by a committee of three readers, the di- 
rector and two other faculty, approved by the Di- 
rector of Graduate Studies. It must also be 



defended in an oral examination to which the en- 
ure graduate faculty in History is invited. 

Application to the M.A. and Ph.D. 
Programs 

The deadline for applications to the graduate pro- 
grams in History is February 15. The Depart- 
ment does not ordinarily make decisions in the fall 
for January admissions. Note: Priority in the 
awarding of financial aid is usually given to stu- 
dents applying to the Ph.D. program. Students 
who ultimately plan to pursue a Ph.D. should 
therefore consider applying directly to the doc- 
toral program. Packets containing application 
materials can be obtained by writing or calling the 
Director of Graduate Study, History Depart- 
ment. Along with the forms in the packet all ap- 
plicants should submit the following material: (1) 
scores of the Graduate Record Exam (the history 
subject test is not required); (2) a succinct typed 
statement outlining your reasons for pursuing 
graduate study in history; (3) a sample of your his- 
torical writing (a paper written for a recent course 
or one written expressly for the application); and 
(4) three (3) letters of recommendation. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Advanced Electives 

Graduate students may take most advanced un- 
dergraduate electives for graduate credits. Typi- 
cally, graduate students fulfill additional require- 
ments specified in advance by the professor. For- 
mal permission is required for graduate students 
to register in such courses. 

HS 303 The Rise of Modern China (F: 3) 

This course is a survey of political, social and in- 
tellectual history from 1600 to the May Fourth 
Movement (Intellectual Revolution) around 1919 
with special attention to Western impact on 
China's domestic development from the mid- 
nineteenth to the early twentieth century. 

Silas Wu 

HS 307 Travelers and Spies in the Middle East: 
Lawrence of Arabia and His Colleagues (F: 3) 

This course will examine the motives of the trav- 
elers, the impact of their writings, and the poli- 
cies and politics they sought to advance. Specific 
topics include the following: psychology of the 
traveler, works of travel as literature and history, 
the genre of travel literature, views of Islam, Ar- 
abs and Turks, the appeal of the East, response 
to and reception of the foreigner, Muslim travel- 
ers in the West, the romantic impulse for travel 
and the Industrial Revolution. Readings will be 
drawn largely from such writers as Lawrence him- 
self, Richard Burton, Charles Doughty, Wilfrid 
Thesiger, and William Gifford Palgrave. 

Benjamin Braude 

HS 31 1 The African Slave Trade (S: 3) 

From antiquity to the late nineteenth century 
black Africans were sold as slaves to the far cor- 
ners of the world. This course examines the ori- 
gins of this nefarious trade with particular empha- 
sis on the trans-Atlantic slave trade that began in 
the sixteenth century. Topics include the eco- 
nomic, political, and moral dimensions of the 
trade, including ways in which slaves were ob- 
tained in Africa, their transport to the New 
World, the slave systems that were established 



there, and the campaign to end the trade in Afri- 
can slaves. The African slave trade is an excellent 
introduction to the changing geography, econom- 
ics, and ideas of the modern world. 

David Northrup 

HS 318 (BK 318) Post Slavery Caribbean (S: 3) 

This course examines the political, economic and 
social evolution of the Caribbean since slave 
emancipation. Its emphasis is on the development 
of underdevelopment in the region, and in this 
regard it looks closely at the historical character 
of the Caribbean's incorporation into the inter- 
national system. Its compass covers the 
Anglophone, Hispanophone and Francophone 
Caribbean from Haitian independence in 1804 to 
the present. Frank Taylor 

HS 325 (BK 399) Revolutionary Cuba: History 
and Politics (S: 3) 

On 1 January 1994 the Cuban Revolution will 
have entered its 35th year in existence. This 
course has as its focus Cuba's foreign and domes- 
tic policies during these years of revolution. Be- 
cause Cuba is, in Fidel Castro's words, a Latin 
African country, some attention will be focused 
on the issue of race and the revolution in Cuba. 
Likewise, the history of Cuba's policies in Africa 
and the Caribbean will be looked at closely. The 
backdrop for this course is the era of the super- 
powers and of the Cold War. It is, however, not 
a traditional course in diplomatic history. It ex- 
plores the interface between domestic and foreign 
policy throughout, relating this to the specific case 
of Cuba since 1959. Frank Taylor 

HS 332 Anglo-Saxon England (S: 3) 

During the course of the semester we will study 
England from the time when the last Roman 
troops pulled out of Britain up through the 
Norman Conquest. In this six hundred year pe- 
riod England witnessed Germanic settlement, 
Viking raids, and a transformation from a land of 
a dozen petty kingdoms to a single, powerful state. 
The course will concentrate on the following 
themes: the peopling of England, the conversion 
of the Germanic barbarians to Christianity, the 
growth of hegemonic kingship, unification, kin- 
ship and lordship, and high culture and low cul- 
tured. The emphasis in the class will be on pri- 
mary sources. We will read chronicles, histories, 
charters, law codes, saints lives, and archaeological 
reports. Robin Fleming 

HS 337 Late Roman Empire (S: 3) 

This course covers the following topics: the re- 
forms of Diocletian, the Germanic invasions, the 
expansion of Islam, the reign of Justinian and 
Theodora, the rise and function of the holy man, 
and the theological controversies of the 4th and 
5th centuries.The transformation of the Roman 
Empire into a Christian state with its capital trans- 
ferred from Rome to Constantinople is the central 
theme. John Rosser 

HS 363 Modern India I: India Under the British 
(F:3) 

The spate of popular films (Gandhi, A Passage to 
India, Heat and Dust) and television series (The 
Jewel in the Crown) on India prompted the Indian 
born writer Salman Rushdie to comment on the 
phenomenon of the revival of the Raj in the West. 
In this course we will consider the implications 



40 • Gradiwit: Arts and Sciences • History 



of this renewed interest by starting with an explo- 
ration ot the myth and the reality of the British 
Raj or British rule in India. This course is de- 
signed as an historical survey of British rule in 
India, from the take-over of India by the British 
Crown in 1858 to Indian independence in 1947. 
We will look at British colonial policy as well as 
at various responses to colonial rule in India, such 
as the social and religious reform movements, 
peasant and anti-caste movements, the women's 
movement and the nationalist movement. We will 
also focus on the alternative to the Raj offered by 
the Indian nationalist movement which, especially 
under the leadership of M. K. Gandhi, had come 
to encompass the interests of the various other 
movements. Mrinalini Sinha 

HS 364 Modern India II: India After 
Independence (S: 3) 

This course focuses on the modern developments 
in the Indian nation after 1947. It begins with an 
evaluation of the ideological foundations of the 
modern Indian state and its ability to deal with the 
many challenges to its legitimacy. In this context 
we will study the threats posed by various regional 
and secessionist movements, the resurgence of 
virulent communal or religious ideologies and the 
increase in violence against backward castes and 
groups and against women. We will also exam- 
ine the vitality of several social movements in 
India, most notably Dalit (backward caste) and 
peasant movements that are addressing a wide 
range of issues from economic and political em- 
powerment to gender, caste and environmental 
issues. Mrinalini Sinha 

HS 365 Spanish Society in the Golden Age 

(S:3) 

This course will examine Spanish society in the 
Golden Age (sixteenth-seventeenth centuries). 
Topics to be treated include the following: the 
Spanish Inquisition, the class structure, the posi- 
tion of minorities and social outcasts, the role of 
women, the church and popular religion, high and 
low culture, the problems of the conquest and 
settlement of the New World, etc. Because the 
literature of the period is such an important mir- 
ror of the age, the readings will include literary 
as well as historical works. Ellen Friedman 

HS 373 (BK 373) Slave Societies in the 
Caribbean and Latin America (F: 3) 

Among the topics covered are the rise and fall of 
slavery, the economics of slave trading, slave 
demography, patterns of slave life, slave laws, slave 
resistance, slave culture, social structure during 
slavery and the roles of the freed people. The 
compass of the course embraces a variety of En- 
glish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch 
speaking countries. The approach taken is a com- 
parative one. Frank F. Taylor 

HS 397 A History of Sport in America (F: 3) 

This course is a look at recreation, leisure and 
sport as a way of life in America and as an inte- 
gral part of the total society. Ranging from urban 
immigrant settlement house basketball in the 
early 1900's to the present-day Holy- War BC- 
Notre Dame football, emphasis is placed on class 
structure in athletics, the issue of race, monetary 
upward mobility, sport and the city, the nation's 
love affair with heroes, and more recently with 
heroines, and gender issues. Andrew Buni 



HS 401 (TH 444) The Reformation (S: 3) 

This course will explore the religious and social 
history of the Protestant and Catholic Reforma- 
tions. We shall examine in detail the major theo- 
logical and ecclesiological questions of the 
sixteenth century by focusing on the ideas and ac- 
tivities of Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Ignatius 
Loyola, and Teresa of Avila. However, we shall 
also devote considerable attention to the opinions 
and religious practices of the ordinary believer — 
Protestant and Catholic, female and male, peas- 
ant and aristocrat. Virginia Reinburg 

HS 422 Modern England (S: 3) 

After a look at the medieval background, the 
course will deal with the period from 1485 to the 
present. Emphasis will be mainly on political and 
constitutional history, but with attention to social 
and intellectual developments as well, and to the 
British Empire of the 19th-20th centuries and 
British influence on the world at large. 

Tho?nas W. Perry 

HS 439 (EN 51 1) Images of Independence (F: 3) 

This course will examine the social and political 
changes of the past revolutionary period in Ire- 
land and their effects upon the intellectual and 
cultural life of the nation through an examination 
of the literary heirs of the revolution. Team 
taught with English. Kevin O'Neill 

Adele Dalsimer 

HS 44 1 -442 Rise of Modern Germany (S: 3) 

This is a two semester upper division elective, 
designed for students who already have a general 
familiarity with European history and who desire 
an intensive examination of the problems sur- 
rounding the emergence of modern Germany, 
especially as seen by recent scholars. Although the 
course is open to all students who have completed 
the Core History program, it is particularly rec- 
ommended for history, political science, and 
German majors. Students are urged to enroll in 
both semesters of this course, although this is not 
required, and some seats will probably be avail- 
able in the spring for students who wish to elect 
only the second half (Germany since 1919). Gen- 
erally, students who desire an in-depth analysis 
primarily centered on Nazi Germany are advised 
to select HS 143 Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich 
that is offered in alternate years. 

John Heineman 

HS 453 Russian History up to the Revolution 
(F:3) 

This course is a study of the major cultural and 
social developments in Russia from the formation 
of the first Russian state to the Bolshevik Revo- 
lution of 1917. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon recent research concerning select problems 
in the field of Russian history. 

Raymond McNally 

HS 454 Twentieth-Century Russia (S: 3) 

Phis course is a survey of Russian history from the 
1905 and 1917 Revolutions to the present day. 
Topics covered include the old Regime, the revo- 
lutionary movement, the Revolution and the Civil 
War, the NEP, the power struggle after Lenin's 
death, the Stalin revolution, industrialization, 
urbanization, collectivization, political terror, 
World War II, the Cold War, Khrushchev and 
de-Stalinization, Brezhnev, the restructuring of 



the Soviet system under Mikhail Gorbachev, the 
August 1991 coup d'etat, Boris Yeltsin, the end 
of the Soviet period, and the ensuring and con- 
tinuing crisis. Roberta Manning 

HS 461 Revolutionary Europe (F: 3) 

Alan Reinerman 
HS 487 France in the Twentieth Century (S: 3) 

The focus of the course will center upon twenti- 
eth-century France's changing perception of her 
own national requirements, both domestically and 
diplomatically. The profound impact of World 
War I, the disarray of the interwar years, the im- 
pact of the Fall of France, Vichy, and the Libera- 
tion will prepare the way for the study of contem- 
porary France from De Gaulle to Mitterand, from 
declining world power to dynamic European 
Community member. Rev. Francis Murphy 

HS 493 Latin-America Elective (S: 3) 

The Department 

HS 500 International Studies: Humanities 
Seminar (S: 3) 

A cross-cultural and interdisciplinary overview of 
how language and literature, religion and ideol- 
ogy, history and the fine arts shape human inter- 
action across political and national boundaries. 
The course is intended as the coordinating semi- 
nar for students minoring in International Stud- 
ies who are interested in topics that are primarily 
non-governmental and non-economic. During 
the first part of the course, patterns of global hu- 
manistic communication and interaction will be 
introduced in readings, lectures, and discussions. 
In the second half students will prepare and 
present research papers on some aspects of cross- 
cultural humanistic studies. David Northrup 

HS 539-540 History of American Women 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will introduce students to themes in 
the social history of American women. We 
will pay particular attention to the diversity of 
women's experiences and the ways in which 
class, race, ethnicity, and gender have informed 
women's lives. The course explores the history of 
American women in the twentieth century. There 
will be a substantial amount of reading in primary 
and secondary sources. Sherri Broder 

HS 541-542 U. S. Social History (F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a two-semester course covering social 
change in America from colonial times to the 
present. The course begins with the adaptation of 
Indian culture to the invasion of European set- 
tlers. Major topics are the following: social forces 
in economic change, immigration and migration, 
the interaction of ethnic and religious groups, 
social mobility, movements for social reform, and 
changing patterns of family life. 

The Department 

HS 543 Social Movements in the U. S. since 
1890 (F: 3) 

The Department 

HS 545-546 American Ideas and Institutions 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

A history of thought as it has developed within the 
framework of American society. The course will 
compare ideas of several distinct kinds: those 
which have expressed the prevailing ways of each 
period; those which have offered alternatives; and 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • History • 41 



those which have sought artistically to mirror 
dreams and realities. Alan Lawson 

Graduate Colloquia 

A colloquium consists of readings, primarily in 
secondary sources, on a series of selected topics. 
All graduate students are urged to take at least one 
colloquium each semester. 

HS 803 Soviet History (F: 3) 

A survey of Western historical literature on So- 
viet history from the Russian Revolution of 191 7 
through the present day, with particular attention 
paid to the new social history of twentieth cen- 
tury Russia and the Soviet countryside where a 
majority of Russians lived before 1960. Topics 
covered include the revolution, the NEP, the 
Stalin Revolution, industrialization, collectiviza- 
tion, political terror, World War II, post-Stalinist 
reforms and developments under Krushchev, 
Brezhnev and Gorbachev. This course is intended 
for students in European and Soviet studies and 
will prepare students to teach Soviet history and 
help them prepare for oral and comprehensive 
examinations in this field. Roberta Manning 

HS 814 Imperial Formation: Britain 1763-1945 
(F:3) 

This course aims to bring the history of Britain 
overseas back to the center of British history. It 
is aimed at extending the study of imperialism 
from its present ghettoization in Empire or Third 
World Studies to a re-examination of the tradi- 
tional historical boundaries of Home and Empire, 
metropolitan center and colonial periphery. 
Hence, instead of the standard centrifugal analy- 
ses of imperial influence radiating from Britain to 
its colonies overseas, this course offers what some 
British social historians have called a centripetal 
analysis of imperialism: the impact of imperialism 
and colonialism at Home in Britain. The course 
covers the period of the Second British Empire, 
from the Seven Years War to the Second World 
War. Mrinalini Sinha 

HS 81 5 The Early Middle Ages (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Latin required 

Students in the seminar will write original re- 
search papers on a topic in Anglo-Saxon or 
Carolingian history. This topic will be one upon 
which the students and professor have agreed, and 
will be based, to a large degree, on original 
sources. Students will not only be required to 
write a paper, but to read and critique all papers 
written in the colloquium. Robin Fleming 

HS 823 Nietzsche (F: 3) 

The colloquium's goal will be to examine aspects 
of Nietzsche's relations to history in two, related 
ways. One will be to investigate the history of 
interpretations or uses of Nietzsche by others 
from the 1 890s through the 1 990s. The other will 
be to explore Nietzsche's challenges to the very 
notion of history that enables one to undertake 
the first of these two tasks — his claim that histo- 
rians do not do history, but make it. With and 
against Nietzsche, the colloquium will aim to 
make the historian problematic. Paul Breines 

HS 831 Cultural Geography and 
Anthropological Discovery in European 
Intellectual History (F: 3) 

This course considers the cultural aspects of Eu- 
ropean travel, exploration, and discovery outside 



Europe, the ways in which Europe defined itself 
with respect to other continents, and the discur- 
sive forms according to which non-European 
lands and peoples were registered, regarded, dis- 
covered, and described. Lawrence Wolff 

HS 843 Modern Irish History (S: 3) 

This colloquium will explore some the major is- 
sues in Modern Irish History. Its primary focus 
will be on Revisionism and related developments 
in the writing of Irish social, economic and po- 
litical history over the last two decades. 

Kevin O'Neill 

HS 853 Age of Jackson (S: 3) 

This course includes weekly readings and discus- 
sions of leading historians of the Jacksonian era, 
and significant interpretations of the period of 
United States history from 1815 to 1845. 

Thomas O'Connor 

HS871 U.S. to 1877 (F: 3) 

This course is intended as an introductory, gradu- 
ate level survey of major themes and issues in 
American history through the Civil War and re- 
construction. The approach will be largely histo- 
riographical; it will focus on works of major in- 
terpretive significance rather than upon works of 
a synthetic nature. Sherri Broder 

HS 872 U. S. Since 1877 (S: 3) 

Students will read and discuss recently published 
books in important topics in U.S. history since 
1877: the impact of Reconstruction, Populism, 
responses to industrialization, American Social- 
ism, Progressivism, the impact of the campaign 
for women's suffrage, the emergence of consumer 
culture and contested leisure, the world wars and 
American foreign policy, the Depression, and 
social protest movements, including the civil 
rights movement. The Department 

HS 876 Biography (S: 3) 

After reading a few methodological analyses of the 
genre, we will read and discuss several modern 
biographies. The studies selected will not be lim- 
ited to American subjects. Carol Petillo 

HS 896 Core: Early Modern Europe (S: 3) 

This course will discuss books ranging in period 
from the Italian Renaissance to the French Revo- 
lution. The course is intended to explore a vari- 
ety of historiographical approaches to Early 
Modern Europe and to discuss pedagogical issues 
in the presentation of historical subjects. 

Ellen Friedman 

HS 897 Core: Modern Europe (F: 3) 

The colloquium will serve as a broad introduction 
to major themes, controversies and historio- 
graphic developments in modern European his- 
tory. Students will typically read a book a week, 
or its equivalent, and will be expected to partici- 
pate in class discussions on a regular basis and to 
produce written work evaluating readings. 

James Cronin 

Graduate Seminars 

Seminars primarily involve original research in a 
carefully delineated topic. Students must discuss 
with the professor whether or not they have the 
necessary background and, where appropriate, the 
necessary foreign language ability to qualify for 
admission into the seminar. 



HS 936 19th Century Europe (S: 3) 

The course will deal with the major political, dip- 
lomatic, social, and religious developments in 
Europe during the period 1814-1914. Students, 
in consultation with the professor, will choose a 
topic for their seminar paper from among the 
many possibilities offered by that time period. 

Alan Reinerman 

HS 939 20th Century German History (F: 3) 

John Heineman 
HS 990 American Studies (S: 3) 

This seminar will explore themes in what has 
come to be called Public Culture. It will focus on 
the ties between private life and public affairs in 
order to understand more about certain selected 
cultural patterns. Examples of these patterns in- 
clude the development and influence of state 
policy, the formation of social institutions, the 
creation of major ideas, and the dynamics of group 
character and behavior. Students will proceed by 
looking within some aspect of the public realm for 
issues of concern and persons of note and then 
analyze those issues or persons for an understand- 
ing of their cultural origins and impact. 

Karen Miller 

Graduate Independent Study 

HS 799 Readings and Research: Independent 
Study 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

Graduate students who wish to pursue a se- 
mester of directed readings with individual fac- 
ulty members under this category must secure the 
permission of the faculty member. 

The Graduate Faatlty 

HS 801 Thesis Seminar (F, S: 6) 

A research course under the guidance of a faculty 
member for those writing a six-credit Master's 
Thesis. 

HS 802 Thesis Direction (F: 0-S: 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their thesis. This course must be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. 

HS 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

HS 992 Dissertation Seminar (F: 3-S: 3) 

The aim of this course is to bring together stu- 
dents beginning dissertations in various field to 
discuss the substance of their research and prob- 
lems of theory, method and organization. Stu- 
dents will be expected to report on their work and 
to present, by the end of the course, either a dis- 
sertation proposal or a section of the dissertation 
itself. Carol Petillo 

Virginia Reinburg 

HS 998 Doctoral Comprehensives 

HS 999 Doctoral Continuation (F: 0-S: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register for 
doctoral continuation during each semester of 
their candidacy. 



42 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Mathematics 



Mathematics 



FACULTY 

Stanley J. Bezuszka, S.J., Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., A.M., M.S. Boston College; S.T.L., Weston 
College; Ph.D., Brown University 

Joseph A. Sullivan, Professor -Emeritus; A.B. Boston 
College; M.S. Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Indiana University 

John F. Caufield, S.J. , Assistant Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., A.M. Boston College; S.T.L., Weston 
College 

Joseph F. Krebs., Assistant Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., A.M. Boston College 

Robert J. Leblanc, Assistant Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., A.M. Boston College 

Jenny A. Baglivo, Professor; B.A., Fordham 
University; M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse Univer- 
sity 

Gerald G. Bilodeau, Professor; A.B., University 
of Maine; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Richard L. Faber, Professor; B.S., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; A.M., Ph.D., Brandeis 
University 

Margaret J. Kenney, Professor; B.S., M.A. Boston 
College; Ph.D., Boston University 

John H. Smith, Professor; A.B. , Cornell University; 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Paul R. Thie, Professor; B.S., Canisius College; 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Robert J. Bond, Associate Professor; A.B., Boston 
College; Ph.D., Brown University 

Daniel W. Chambers, Associate Professor; A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Robert H. Gross, AssociateProfessor; A.B., 
Princeton University; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

Richard A. Jenson, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Dartmouth College; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois at Chicago Circle 

William J. Keane, Associate Professor; Chairperson 
of the Department; A.B., Boston College; M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Gerard E. Keough, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Boston College; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Charles Landraitis, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Wesleyan University; M.S., University of 
Pennsylvania; A.M., Ph.D., Dartmouth College 

Harvey R. Margolis, Associate Professor; M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

G. Robert Meyerhoff, Associate Professor; B.B. 
Brown University; Ph.D., Princeton University 

Rennie Mirollo, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Columbia College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Nancy E. Rallis, Associate Professor; A.B., Vassar 
College; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 



Ned I. Rosen, Associate Professor; B.S., Tufts 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

John P. Shanahan, Associate Professor; B.S ., M.S., 
University College, Galway; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University 

C.K. Che\mg,AssistantProfessor;B.Sc., University 
of Hong Kong; Ph.D., University of California 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Master of Arts Program 

The Department of Mathematics offers a flexible 
M.A. program for students wishing to study math- 
ematics at an advanced level. Beyond the common 
core of required courses described below, students 
may select courses according to their individual 
interests. Courses are available in both pure and 
applied areas for students wanting to broaden 
their background for entrance to a doctoral pro- 
gram or before seeking employment in govern- 
ment, industry, or education. 

In particular, in pure mathematics, courses in 
topology, analysis, algebra, and logic are offered. 
In applied areas, courses to meet specific needs are 
provided. For a student interested in a career in 
actuarial mathematics, the Department offers 
courses in probability and statistics, numerical 
analysis, and mathematical programming (opera- 
tions research). For students interested in com- 
puter science the Department, in conjunction 
with the Computer Science Department of the 
Carroll School of Management, offers courses in 
programming, data structures, machine language, 
algorithms, automata and formal languages, and 
alternate year electives in topics such as computer 
graphics. 

Students interested in a teaching career at the 
secondary level should be aware that because of 
certification requirements, unless approved 
equivalents have been taken previously, their 
course work should include the following: 

• MT 45 1 (Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geom- 
etry), 

• MT 426-427 (Probability and Mathematical 
Statistics), 

• some exposure to the use of computers in math- 
ematics — which may be accomplished by taking 
any 500 level course except MT 550. 

The course requirements for the degree are 
30 credit hours of courses in the Department and 
participation in a non-credit seminar (MT 902- 
903). Under special circumstances, and with the 
approval of the Graduate Committee and the 
Department Chairperson, a student can satisfy the 
degree requirements with 24 credit hours of 
courses and a thesis (6 credit hours). 

All students are required to take (or have the 
equivalent of) MT 804-805 (Analysis), MT 816- 
817 (Modern Algebra) and either MT 814-815 
(Complex Variables), MT 840-841 (Topology) or 
MT 860-861 (Logic and Foundations). All stu- 
dents must pass a written comprehensive 



examination in analysis and algebra (based on MT 
804-805 and 816-817). 

Subject to approval of the Graduate Commit- 
tee, a student may receive credit for the follow- 
ing undergraduate courses: MT 414, 426^-27, 
430, 435-436, 440, 445, 451, 452, 480, and any 
500 level course except MT 550. However, stu- 
dents may be required to do extra work in these 
courses in order to earn graduate credit. Beyond 
the ten courses used to satisfy the degree require- 
ments, students may take some additional courses 
in or outside the Department. 

Each graduate student should consult with the 
Director of the Graduate Program to develop a 
program suitable for his or her needs. Final ap- 
proval for each student's program is granted by 
the Graduate Committee. 

Master of Science in Teaching 
Program 

The Department offers a program leading to 
the degree of Master of Science in Teaching 
(M.S.T.) in cooperation with the 
Graduate School of Education. This program 
is designed either for experienced teachers or for 
prospective teachers and consists of five courses 
in mathematics and up to 24 credits in education, 
depending on experience. Additional information 
on the program is available in the Education sec- 
tion of this Catalog. Degree candidates draw up 
an overall plan of study with joint advisement 
from the Director of the Graduate Program in 
Mathematics and the advisor for the M.S.T. pro- 
gram in the Graduate School of Education. 

Candidates are required to complete 
MT 804-805 (Analysis) and three other MT 
courses at or above the 400 level, including at least 
one from among MT 400-499 or MT 800-899. 
Because of certification requirements, unless ap- 
proved equivalents have been taken previously, 
these required courses should include the follow- 
ing: 

• MT 45 1 (Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geom- 
etry), 

• either MT 420 (Probability and Statistics) or 
MT 426-427 (Probability and Mathematical Sta- 
tistics) 

• some exposure to the use of computers in math- 
ematics — which may be accomplished by taking 
MT 550 (Computer Science I) or any other 
higher level computer course. 

Another course particularly well suited for this 
program is MT 430 (Number Theory). 

M.S.T. candidates must also pass an oral com- 
prehensive examination and submit a brief exposi- 
tory paper in some area of mathematics. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

MT 410 Differential Equations (F: 3) 

This course is intended primarily for the general 
student who is interested in seeing applications of 
mathematics. Among the topics covered will be 
the following: first order linear equations, second 
order linear equations, general nth order 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Mathematics • 43 



equations with constant coefficients, series solu- 
tions and special functions. 

MT 414 Numerical Analysis (S: 3) 

Topics include the solution of linear and 
nonlinear algebraic equations, interpolation, nu- 
merical differentiation and integration, numeri- 
cal solution of ordinary differential equations and 
approximation theory. 

MT 420 Probability and Statistics (S: 3) 

This course is introductory but assumes a calcu- 
lus background. It is open to any mathematics or 
science major who has not taken MT 426. Its 
purpose is to provide an overview of the basic 
concepts of probability and statistics and their 
applications. Topics include probability functions 
over discrete and continuous sample spaces, in- 
dependence and conditional probabilities, ran- 
dom variables and their distributions, sampling 
theory, the central limit theorem, expectation, 
confidence intervals and estimation and hypoth- 
esis testing. 

MT 426 Probability (F: 3) 

This course is a general introduction to modern 
probability theory. Topics studied include prob- 
ability spaces, distributions of functions of ran- 
dom variables, weak law of large numbers, cen- 
tral limit theorems, and conditional distributions. 

MT 427 Mathematical Statistics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 426 

Topics studied include the following: sam- 
pling distributions, introduction to decision 
theory, parametric point and interval estimation, 
hypothesis testing and introduction to Bayesian 
statistics. 

MT 430 Introduction to Number Theory (S: 3) 

Topics covered include divisibility, unique factor- 
ization, congruences, number-theoretic func- 
tions, primitive roots, diophantine equations, 
continued fractions, quadratic residues, and the 
distribution of primes. An attempt will be made 
to provide historical background for various prob- 
lems and to provide examples useful in the sec- 
ondary school curriculum. 

MT 435-436 Mathematical Programming I, II 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

By providing an introduction to the theory, tech- 
niques, and applications of mathematical pro- 
gramming, this course demonstrates how math- 
ematical theory can be developed and applied to 
solve problems from management, economics, 
and the social sciences. Topics studied from lin- 
ear programming include a general discussion of 
linear optimization models, the theory and devel- 
opment of the simplex algorithm, degeneracy, 
duality, sensitivity analysis, and the dual simplex 
algorithm. Integer programming problems, and 
the transportation and assignment problems are 
considered, and algorithms are developed for their 
resolution. Other topics are drawn from game 
theory, dynamic programming, Markov decision 
processes (with finite and infinite horizons), net- 
work analysis, and non-linear programming. 

MT 440 Dynamical Systems (S: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the theory of 
iterated functions of a single variable. Topics in- 
clude the following: fixed points, periodic points, 
the quadratic family, bifurcations, one and two 



dimensional chaos, fractals, iterated function sys- 
tems, Julia sets, and the Mandelbrot set. 

MT 445 Applied Combinatorics (F: 3) 

This is a course in enumeration and graph theory. 
The object of the course is to develop proficiency 
in solving discrete mathematics problems. Among 
the topics covered are the following: counting 
methods for arrangements and selections, the pi- 
geonhole principle, the inclusion-exclusion prin- 
ciple, generating functions, recurrence relations, 
graph theory, trees and searching, and network 
algorithms. The problem-solving techniques de- 
veloped apply to the analysis of computer systems 
but most of the problems in the course are from 
recreational mathematics. Not open to students 
who have completed MT 244. 

MT 451 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean 
Geometry (S: 3) 

This course surveys the history and foundations 
of geometry from ancient to modern times. Top- 
ics will be selected from among the following: 
Mesopotamian and Egyptian mathematics, Greek 
geometry, the axiomatic method, history of the 
parallel postulate, the Lobachevskian plane, 
Hilbert's axioms for Euclidean geometry, ellip- 
tic and projective geometry, the trigonometric 
formulas, models, geometry and the study of 
physical space. 

MT 452 Differential Geometry and Relativity 

An introduction to the differential geometry of 
surfaces and to the special and general theory of 
relativity. Topics include curves in the plane and 
3 -space, the first and second fundamental forms 
of a surface, curvature, geodesies, Riemannian 
manifolds, inertial reference frames, the postu- 
lates of relativity, relativity of simultaneity, 
Lorentz geometry, the equivalence principle, 
gravity as space-time curvature, the field equa- 
tions, the Schwartzschild solutions, the conse- 
quences of Einstein's theory. Nor offered 1994-95 

MT 470 Mathematical Modeling (F: 3) 

Mathematical Modeling is the process of apply- 
ing mathematical techniques to resolve practical 
problems. Steps involved include the following: 
(1) the identification of a particular problem, (2) 
the making of assumptions and the collection of 
data, (3) the formulation of a specific mathemati- 
cal problem, (4) The resolution of this problem, 
(5) the translation of this solution into a practical 
course of action. Model construction and its vari- 
ous components will be demonstrated by means 
of examples and exercises and students will be 
actively engaged in the modeling process through 
individual and group projects. Special modeling 
techniques as, for example, curve fitting, dimen- 
sion analysis, and simulation, will be discussed 
along with important model types such as, opti- 
mization problems, queues, and interactive 
dynamic systems. 

MT 480 Mathematics Seminar 

Topics of this one-semester seminar course vary 
from year to year according to the interests of 
faculty and students. With department permission 
it may be repeated. Not offered 1994-95 

MT 550 (MC 140) Computer Science I (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Some computer experience, or per- 
mission of the instructor 



This course is an introduction to the art and 
science of computer programming and to some 
of the fundamental concepts of computer science. 
Students will write programs in the C language; 
good program design methodology will be 
stressed throughout. There will also be study of 
some basic notions of computer science, includ- 
ing computer systems organization, files, and 
some algorithms of fundamental importance. 

MT 551 (MC 141) Computer Science II (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science I (MT 550/MC 

140) or the equivalent 

In this course, students will write programs 
that employ more sophisticated and efficient 
means of representing and manipulating informa- 
tion. Part of the course is devoted to a continued 
study of programming, in particular the use of 
linked storage and recursive subprograms. The 
principle emphasis, however, is on the study of the 
fundamental data structures of computer science 
(lists, stacks, queues, trees, etc.) in terms of both 
their abstract properties and their implementa- 
tions in computer programs, and the study of fun- 
damental algorithms for manipulating these 
structures. 

MT 566 Programming Languages 

Prerequisite: Computer Science II (MT 551/MC 

141) or the equivalent 

The course will focus on the essential concepts 
that are common to modern programming lan- 
guages and the run-time behavior of programs 
written in such languages. By understanding these 
concepts and their implementations in the differ- 
ent languages, the student will be able to evalu- 
ate the advantages and disadvantages of a language 
for a given application. Strong programming skills 
are required. Not offered 1994-95 

MT 568 (MC 633) Computer Graphics 

Prerequisite: MC 141/MT 551, grade of B or bet- 
ter in MC 140/MT 550, or permission of the in- 
structor 

This course deals with the important ideas and 
techniques underlying interactive computer 
graphics. We will focus on programming tech- 
niques for manipulating graphical objects quickly 
and efficiently. Not offered 1994-95 

MT 572 (MC 260) Computer Organization and 
Assembly Language (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Computer Science II (MT 551/MC 
141) or the equivalent 

This course is a study of the organization of 
computers at the low level of the processing of 
machine instructions. Topics include the organi- 
zation of the CPU and memory, computer rep- 
resentation of numbers, the instruction execution 
cycle, traps and interrupts, implementations of 
arithmetic operations, complex data structures, 
and subroutine linkage, and the functioning of 
assemblers and linkers. Students will write pro- 
grams in the assembly language of a particular 
computer. 

MT 577 (MC 652) Microcomputer Applications 
Development 

Prerequisite: Computer Science II (MT 551/MC 
141) or the equivalent 

This course aids the student in designing and 
implementing user applications on a 
microcomputer. The microcomputer's hardware 



44 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Philosophy 



configuration and operating system will be stud- 
ied. Application development software systems, 
especially those based on object-oriented class li- 
braries and application frameworks, will be used. 
User interface guidelines for application software 
will also be addressed. Not offered 1994-95 

MT 583 (MC 383) Algorithms (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science II (MT 55 1/MC 
141) or the equivalent; MT420, MT426, or MT 
445, or the equivalent 

This course is a study of algorithms for, 
among other things, sorting, searching, pattern 
matching, and manipulation of graphs and trees. 
Emphasis is placed on the mathematical analysis 
of the time and memory requirements of such 
algorithms and on general techniques for improv- 
ing their performance. 

MT 585 (MC 385) Theory of Computation (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Computer Science II (MT 5 5 1/MC 
141) or the equivalent; MT420, MT426, or MT 
445, or the equivalent 

This course is an introduction to the theoreti- 
cal foundations of computing, through the study 
of mathematical models of computing machines 
and computational problems. Topics include 
finite-state automata, context-free languages, 
Turing machines, undecidable problems, and 
computational complexity. 

MT 801 Thesis Seminar (F, S: 3) 

Problems of research and thesis guidance, supple- 
mented by individual conferences. 

MT 802 Thesis Direction (F, S: 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their thesis. This course must be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. 

MT 804-805 Analysis I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is intended to emphasize the basic 
ideas and results of calculus and to provide an 
introduction to abstract analysis. The course be- 
gins with an axiomatic introduction to the real 



number system. Metric spaces are then intro- 
duced. Theoretical aspects of convergence, con- 
tinuity, differentiation and integration are treated 
carefully and are studied in the context of a met- 
ric space. The course includes an introduction to 
the Lebesgue integral. 

MT 8 1 4-8 1 5 Theory of Functions of a Complex 
Variable I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course includes the following: differentiation 
and integration of a function of a complex vari- 
able, series expansion, residue theory, entire and 
meromorphic functions, multiple-valued func- 
tions, Riemann surfaces, and conformal mapping 
problems. 

MT 816-817 Modern Algebra I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will study the basic structures of ab- 
stract algebra. Topics will include groups, rings, 
ideal theory, unique factorization, homomor- 
phisms, field extensions and possibly Galois 
theory. 

MT 820 Measure and Integration (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 804-805 or the equivalent 

This is a course in the classical theory of func- 
tions of a real variable. Topics include the 
Lebesgue integral, the classical Banach spaces, 
and integration in general measure spaces. 

MT 840-841 Topology I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course is a first course in topology for both 
undergraduate and graduate students. Topology 
is the study of geometric phenomena of a very 
general sort, and as such, topological notions ap- 
pear throughout pure and applied mathematics. 
The first semester is devoted to General or Point- 
Set Topology with emphasis on those topics of 
greatest applicability. The subject will be pre- 
sented in a self-contained and rigorous fashion 
with stress on the underlying geometric insights. 
The content of the second semester varies from 
year to year. Generally it will be an introduction 
to a specialized area of topology; for example al- 
gebraic, differential or geometric topology. 



MT 860 Mathematical Logic 

This course is a mathematical examination of the 
way mathematics is done: of axiom systems, logi- 
cal inference, and the questions that can (or can- 
not) be resolved by inference from those axioms. 
Specific topics will include the prepositional cal- 
culus, first order theories, decidability, and 
Godel's Completeness Theorem. Not offered 
1994-95 

MT 861 Foundations of Mathematics 

Prerequisite: MT 860 or the equivalent 

Topics to be treated in this course will be se- 
lected from one or more of the following areas: 
formal number theory, axiomatic set theory, ef- 
fective computability, and recursive function 
theory. Not offered 1994-95 

MT 880 Topics in Mathematics 

The subject of this one-semester course varies 
from year to year according to the interests of 
faculty and students. With permission of the 
Graduate Committee, it may be repeated. Not 
offered 1994-95 

MT 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

MT 899 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 

This is an independent study course, taken under 
the supervision of a Mathematics Department 
faculty member. Department permission is re- 
quired, and interested students should see the 
Director of the Graduate Program. 

MT 902-903 Seminar (F: 0-S: 0) 

This is a non-credit course required of all candi- 
dates for the M.A. degree who do not take 
MT801. 



Philosophy 



FACULTY 

James Bernauer, S.J. Professor; A.B., Fordham 
University; A.M., St. Louis University; M.Div., 
Woodstock College; S.T.M., Union Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., State University of New York 

Oliva Blanchette, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., 
Universite Laval; Ph.L., College St. Albert de 
Louvain 

Richard Cobb-Stevens, Professor; Chairperson 
of the Department; A.B., A.M., Boston College; 
Ph.D., University of Paris 

Richard Kearney, Visiting Professor; B.A., 
University of Dublin; M.A., McGill University; 
Ph.D., University of Paris 



Peter J. Kreeft, Professor; A.B., Calvin College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Richard T. Murphy, Professor; A. B . , A.M ., Boston 
College; S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., 
Fordham University 

Joseph L. Navickas, Professor; Ph.B., Ph.L., 
Louvain University; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Thomas J. Owens, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

David M. Rasmussen, Professor; A.B., University 
of Minnesota; B.D., A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago 

William J. Richardson, S. J., Professor; Ph.L., 
Woodstock College; Th.L., Ph.D., Maitre- 
Agrege, University of Louvain 



Jacques M. Taminiaux, Professor; Doctor Juris, 
Ph.D., Maitre-Agrege, University of Louvain 

NormanJ. Wells, Professor; A.B., Boston College; 
L.M.S., Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Ronald Anderson, S.J., Associate Professor; B.Sc, 
University of Canterbury; Ph.D., University of 
Melbourne; M.Div., Weston School of Theology; 
Ph.D., Boston University 

Patrick Byrne, Associate Professor; B.S., A.M., 
Boston College; Ph.D., New YorkState University 

JohnJ. Geary, Associate Professor; A.M., University 
College, Dublin; Ph.D., Boston University 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Philosophy 



• 45 



Joseph F.X. Flanagan, S.J., Associate Professor; 
A.B., A.M., Boston College; S.T.L., Weston 
College; D.D.S., Washington University; Ph.D., 
Fordham University 

Gary Gurtler, S J., Associate Professor; B.A., St. 
John Fisher College; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham 
University; M.Div., Weston School of Theology 

Arthur R. Madigan, S J ., Associate Professor; A.B., 
Fordham University; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Toronto; M.Div., S.T.B., Regis College, Toronto 

Stuart B. Martin, Associate Professor; A.B., Sacred 
Heart College; L.M.H., Pontifical Institute of 
Medieval Studies; A.M., Ph.D., Fordham 
University 

Francis Soo, Associate Professor; A.B., Berchmans 
College; A.M., University of Philippines; B.S.T., 
Fu-Jen University; A.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Eileen C. Sweeney, Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Dallas; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Texas at Austin 

Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J., Associate Professor; A.B., 
Boston College; M.Div., Weston College; Ph.D., 
University of Toronto 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. , Assistant Professor; A.B., 
A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Vanessa P. Rumble, Assistant Professor; B.A., 

Mercer University; Ph.D., Emory University 

Ingrid Scheibler, Assistant Professor; B.A., 

University of Virginia; Ph.D. Trinity College, 

Cambridge 

Richard A. Spinello, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 

A.B., M.B.A., Boston College; M.A., Ph.D., 

Fordham University 

Elizabeth Brient, Instructor; B.A. Rice University; 

M. Phil, Ph.D. (cand.), Yale University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department of Philosophy offers a strong 
emphasis on the history of philosophy (ancient, 
medieval, modern, and contemporary) and a spe- 
cial focus on Continental European philosophy 
from Kant to the present. Faculty also teach and 
conduct research in metaphysics, philosophy of 
science, philosophy of religion, ethics, and social 
and political philosophy. Students have consider- 
able flexibility in designing programs of study, and 
have access to the resources of Political Science, 
Theology, and other departments. 

The Department offers a Ph.D. program and 
a program leading to an M.A. All applicants who 
are native speakers of English must submit the 
results of the Graduate Record Examination. All 
applicants who are not native speakers of English 
must submit the results of the TOEFL Examina- 
tion. Admission to the doctoral program is highly 
selective (5 or 6 admitted each year out of over 
150 applicants). 

Requirements for the Ph.D. are as follows: 
one year of full-time residence; 16 courses (48 
credits); proficiency in logic (tested by course or 
by examination); proficiency in two foreign 



languages (usually French and German); prelimi- 
nary comprehensive examination; doctoral com- 
prehensive examination; dissertation; and oral de- 
fense of the dissertation. Students entering the 
program with an M.A. in philosophy may be cred- 
ited with 10 courses (30 credits) towards the Ph.D. 
The preliminary comprehensive is a one hour oral 
examination on a reading list in the history of 
philosophy; it is to be taken at the end of the 
student's first year. The doctoral comprehensive 
is a two hour oral examination on the student's 
dissertation proposal, a systematic problem, and 
two major philosophers; it is to be taken by No- 
vember of the student's fourth year (third year, 
for students entering the program with the M.A. 
in hand). Doctoral students are generally admit- 
ted with financial aid in the form of Research 
Assistantships and Teaching Fellowships. Re- 
search assistants and teaching fellows receive re- 
mission of tuition for required courses. Doctoral 
students generally teach after the first year; the 
program includes a Seminar on Teaching. Doc- 
toral students are expected to pursue the degree 
on a full-time basis and to maintain satisfactory 
progress towards the completion of degree re- 
quirements. 

Requirements for the M.A. are as follows: 10 
courses (30 credits); proficiency in one foreign 
language (usually French or German); and a one 
hour oral comprehensive examination on a read- 
ing list in the history of philosophy. It is possible, 
though not common, for students to write an 
M.A. thesis in place of 2 courses (6 credits). The 
M.A. may be taken on a full-time basis or on a 
part-time basis. Departmental financial aid and 
tuition remission are not normally available for 
students seeking an M.A. 

Institute of Medieval Philosophy and 
Theology 

The Department of Philosophy is linked to the 
Institute of Medieval Philosophy and Theology. 
The institute is a center that unites the teaching 
and research efforts of faculty members in the 
Philosophy and Theology Departments who spe- 
cialize in medieval philosophy and theology. 
Doctoral degrees are awarded in the Philosophy 
(or Theology) Department, and students study 
within one of these departments. The focus of the 
Institute is on the relationship between medieval 
philosophy and theology and modern continen- 
tal philosophy and theology. 

To foster this dialogue and encourage the 
scholarly retrieval of the great medieval intellec- 
tual world, the Institute offers graduate student 
fellowships and assistantships, sponsors a speak- 
ers program, runs a faculty-student seminar to 
investigate new areas of medieval philosophical 
and theological research, and runs a research cen- 
ter to assist in the publication of monographs and 
articles in the diverse areas of medieval philoso- 
phy and theology to encourage the translation of 
medieval sources and the editing of philosophi- 
cal and theological texts. 

The Lonergan Center 

Studies related to the work of Jesuit theologian 
and philosopher Bernard Lonergan (1904-1984) 
are focused in the Lonergan Center at Boston 
College. Inaugurated in 1986, the Center houses 



a growing collection of Lonergan's published and 
unpublished writings as well as secondary mate- 
rials and reference works, and it also serves as a 
seminar and meeting room. The Center is on the 
fourth level of Bapst Library and is open during 
regular hours as posted. The director is Profes- 
sor Charles Hening. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

If a desired course is not offered, please consult 
with the appropriate professor; it may be possible 
to arrange a Readings and Research course on the 
desired topic. 

PL 303 Philosophical Questions in Religion 

This course is for students who want to form their 
individual opinions rationally on such controver- 
sial religious topics as the following: the psychol- 
ogy of belief, the problem of evil, arguments for 
God's existence, our knowledge of God, predes- 
tination and free will, time and eternity, life after 
death, miracles, the reliability of the Bible, mys- 
ticism and Eastern versus Western religions. A 
problem-oriented textbook is supplemented by 
readings in C. S. Lewis and Thomas Aquinas. Not 
offered 1994-95 Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 308 Political Thought of the Greeks 

This course is an examination of Greek political 
philosophy, with special emphasis on Plato's Re- 
public and Aristotle's Politics; it is an attempt to 
apply the resources of Greek thought to some of 
the perennial issues of political philosophy. Not 
offered 1 994-95 Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 309 Marriage and the Family (S: 3) 

The course is designed, from a philosophical per- 
spective, to explore the full significance of the 
most fundamental and intimate human relation- 
ship, marriage/family, on both institutional and 
personal levels. Francis Y. Soo 

PL 314 The Mind and Its Body 

Am I my body and nothing more? Is there such a 
thing as a soul? If there is, can I know anything 
about it? What is the relationship between mind 
and body? Is there unity between them? What ac- 
counts for their existence? Are they separable? 
Could the soul possibly survive the dissolution of 
the body? Can I know any of this? These are some 
of the questions we will raise and try to answer. 
Not offered 1 994-95 Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 335 Platonic Dialogues (F: 3) 

This course is an inquiry into the developing 
thought of Plato, stressing particularly Plato's 
probing into the questions of the nature of man, 
the relation of the individual to society, the na- 
ture of human knowing, the foundation of judg- 
ments of value, and the meaning of a virtuous life. 
This course is intended for students who are be- 
ginning Plato or at least have not studied him in 
depth. No knowledge of Greek is required. 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PL 338 The Heidegger Project I (F: 3) 

This is a course designed to allow undergraduates 
an opportunity to work closely with the major 
texts of Heidegger, one of the leading twentieth- 
century philosophers. Students will be expected 
to participate in assessing Heidegger's relevance 
to contemporary issues and in developing their 
own philosophical views vis-a-vis Heidegger's. 
Some knowledge of traditional philosophy 



46 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Philosophy 



(e.g., Aristotle, Descartes, etc.) would be helpful, 
but is not an absolute prerequisite. 

ThoTnasJ. Owens 
PL 339 The Heidegger Project II (S: 3) 
A continuation of PL 338, open only to students 
participating in the course. Thomas J. Owens 

PL 344 Aristotelian Ethics (S: 3) 

This course includes a reading of Aristotle's 
Nico?nachean Ethics, and an examination of its prin- 
ciple themes: happiness, virtue, responsibility, 
justice, moral weakness, friendship, pleasure, con- 
templation. Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 358 The Confessions of St. Augustine (S: 3) 

This course is an in-depth exploration, seminar 
style, of the most beloved and influential book of 
religious psychology of all time. Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 379 Socrates and Jesus 

The purpose of this course is to make the acquain- 
tance of and to compare the two most influential 
people who ever lived — the inventor of reason and 
the object of faith — philosophy and religion com- 
pared at their source. Included are intensive read- 
ings and discussions of Great Dialogues of Plato and 
John's Gospel. Not offered 1994-95 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 384 Toward a Philosophy of Law (F: 3) 

This course will examine the notion of law in the 
West from its Greek origins to the Enlightenment 
in Europe at the time when the American Con- 
stitution was born. William Richardson, S.J. 

PL 402 Kant's Moral Philosophy 

How we make moral decisions warrants close ex- 
amination. Often we experience a conflict be- 
tween what seems the best and what seems the 
right thing to do. Kant offers a theory to substan- 
tiate our choice for what is right — our duty. This 
view has been challenged. The course seeks to 
present and evaluate Kant's theory of duty. Not 
offered 1 994-95 Richard T. Murphy 

PL 403 Does God Exist? (F: 3) 

This course aims to be a serious examination, for 
capable undergraduates, of arguments for and 
against the existence of God. 

Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 404 Philosophical Autobiography (F: 3) 

We will examine the understanding of human na- 
ture that is conveyed in the autobiographies of St. 
Augustine, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and Maya 
Angelou. The following topics will be key: (1) the 
nature and limits of human self-understanding; (2) 
the relation of the human subject to time; (3) the 
manner in which the narrative structures and fa- 
cilitates self-understanding. Vanessa P. Rumble 

PL 405 Self -Deception and Morality 

This course will deal with the main moral and an- 
thropological perspectives on self-deception that 
have emerged in western philosophy, particularly 
in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Two 
related questions will be posed to each of the 
thinkers studied: (1 ) How must the human self be 
constituted in order for self-deception to be pos- 
sible? (2) Is the self-deceiver morally responsible? 
Not offered 1994-95 Vanessa P. Rumble 

PL 41 5 Great Trials in Western Civilization 

Since the time of Socrates, many of the central 
issues of human existence have been raised and 



treated in judicial trials. This course will exam- 
ine the development of our moral-political judg- 
ment by a study of significant trials that have taken 
place in western civilization. Not offered in 
1 994-95 James W. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 416 Hannah Arendt: Human Condition and 
the Life of the Mind 

Though still controversial, Hannah Arendt is now 
recognized as one of the major thinkers of this 
century in areas such as political philosophy and 
the deconstruction of metaphysics. The purpose 
of this course is to offer an introduction to the 
main topics in her inquiry into first, the structures 
of active life (labor, work, action, the private and 
public), and second, her criticism of several con- 
stantly recurring prejudices in the works of those 
who are entirely dedicated to the activity of think- 
ing; that is, the professional philosophers. Not 
offered 1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 419 Philosophy of Friendship (F: 3) 

Friendship presents several challenges to philo- 
sophical reflection. We tend to define human na- 
ture with reference to the individual, but none of 
us wants to be without friends. We tend to define 
ethics in terms of the rights or duties of the indi- 
vidual in relation to others, but it is not clear how 
such language applies to friends. What makes 
friendship unique, and have philosophers been 
able to speak about it adequately? 

Gary M. Gurtler, S.J. 

PL 420 Legacy of Plato and Aristotle in 
Christian Fine Arts into the Renaissance 

This course is a study of the theological and philo- 
sophical background of Christian painting, sculp- 
ture, and architecture. Not offered 1994-95 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 421 Nietzsche 

Through a chronological analysis of the basic texts 
of Nietzsche, this course aims at discussing the 
meaning of his attempt to overqome platonism. 
Not offered 1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 422 Eros and Ethics: Plato, Kant, and 
Kierkegaard (S: 3) 

Often we experience our love of persons and of 
finitude generally as in conflict with moral obli- 
gation. We will examine the manner in which this 
conflict is represented in the ethical thought of 
Plato, Kant, and Kierkegaard. The following 
questions will be central: Is there an affinity be- 
tween desire for persons and the love of the Good, 
how fundamental is this affinity, and what does it 
reveal about the nature of each? 

Vanessa P. Rumble 

PL 428 Introduction to Phenomenology 

This course is an historical and textual survey of 
the development of the Phenomenological move- 
ment from Husserl to Heidegger. Not offered 
1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 434 (UN 502) Capstone: Ethics in the 
Professions (F: 3-S: 3) 

This course will focus on controversial moral di- 
lemmas that arise in the professions of law, busi- 
ness, medicine, education, and journalism. In ad- 
dition to considering some key ethical theories 
(e.g., pluralism and utilitarianism), which can be 
used as a framework for addressing these prob- 
lems, it will also dwell on relevant moral notions 



such as virtue and collective responsibility. The 
course will deal extensively with issues such as 
privacy and confidentiality, deception, whistle- 
blowing, preferential hiring, and so forth. Cases 
will be used to help students develop analytical 
skills and enhance their capacity for making 
sound, moral judgments in different situations. 
Speakers representing some of these^Professions 
will discuss their conceptions of professional re- 
sponsibility along with the ethical dilemmas that 
they have encountered. Richard A. Spinello 

PL 435 Theory of the Novel (S: 3) 

This course will consider the relationship between 
the production of literature and philosophy. Al- 
though writers do not intend to be philosophers, 
they do isolate and present a specific vision of re- 
ality. This course will concentrate on the philo- 
sophic vision presented in specific literary texts 
such as the following: One Hundred H$ars of Soli- 
tude, Crime and Punishment, The Sun Also Rises, 
Death in Venice, Light in August, and Madame 
Bovary. David M. Rasmussen 

PL 442 Romanticism and Idealism 

Kant's transcendental idealism has been charged 
with divorcing the subject of understanding from 
the subject of moral experience. We shall exam- 
ine the basis of this claim, as well as the attempts 
by Romantic writers and German Idealists to pro- 
vide a fresh account of the integrity of human 
experience. Not offered 1994-95 m ' 

Vanessa P. Rumble 

PL 449 Corporations and Morality 

This course will begin with a reflection on the 
main ethical theories that can be used as frame- 
works for making moral judgments. To test the 
efficacy of such theories, we will examine several 
cases dealing with moral dilemmas that can arise 
in the workplace. At this point, our focus shifts 
to the corporation as a special entity in society that 
has the same autonomy and moral agency as the 
person. After delineating a tenable theory of cor- 
porate responsibility, we will examine how the 
corporation functions as a moral agent in the 
larger society and as a moral environment to be 
managed with a view to the freedom and well- 
being of its members. Not offe?~ed 1994-95 

Richard A. Spinello 

PL 452 Perspectives on Addiction 

This course attempts to apply the ordering and 
integrating function of philosophy to the multi- 
faceted problem of addiction. The chief focus is 
on alcoholic addiction, but includes addiction to 
other drugs as well. Not offered 1994-95 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 

PL 455 Kierkegaard and Nietzsche (F: 3) 

Kierkegaard and Nietzsche are the two most im- 
portant giants of thought in the nineWenth cen- 
tury and the two leading influences on contem- 
porary thought. This course will study their lives 
and the predominant themes of their thought 
along the lines of Christian belief and Atheistic 
Humanism. Stuart B. Martin 

PL 456 The Holocaust: A Moral History 

The tragic event that ruptured modern western 
morality will be examined from a variety of per- 
spectives (literary, philosophical, theological, and 
political). We shall study the testimony of both 



Graduate Arts an!) Sciences • Philosophy 



• 47 



its victims and its perpetrators. Special attention 
will be given to consideration of the intellectual 
and moral factors which motivated resistance or 
excused indifference. We shall conclude with in- 
terpretations of its meaning for contemporary 
morality and of its theological significance for 
Christians and Jews. Not offered 1994-95 

James IV. Bemauer, S.J. 

PL 458 Contemporary Movements in 
Continental Thought (S: 3) 

This course analyses the major trends in 20th 
century European philosophy from phenomenol- 
ogy and existentialism to structuralism and 
deconstruction. It explores the different ways in 
which these movements respond to the contem- 
porary crisis in the arts and sciences by rethink- 
ing traditional concepts of meaning, truth, iden- 
tity and value. Richard M. Kearney 

PL 465 Sexuality: New Histories, Old Ethics? 

The last twenty years have witnessed an explosion 
of historical investigations of sexuality in western 
culture. This course will examine several of these 
studies in the interest of appreciating the histori- 
cal development of anxiety toward and acceptance 
of sexual activity. We will attempt to explore the 
implications of these historical visions for an ethi- 
cal approach to sexual conduct. Not offered 
1994-95 James W. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 467 Jean-Paul Sartre (S: 3) 

This course is an analysis of Sartre's early writ- 
ings on imagination and consciousness. Empha- 
sis will be placed upon his penetrating studies of 
freedom, bad faith and the sadomasochistic di- 
mensions of interpersonal relations. Both literary 
and philosophical texts will be discussed. 

Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 474 Philosophy of Laughter, Humor and 
Satire (S: 3) 

This course involves studying a considerable sam- 
pling of the great works of satire and comedy from 
all ages, from the ancient Greeks to the contem- 
porary period. The focus is on what light philoso- 
phy throws on the nature of humor and satire and 
what satire and laughter tell us about ourselves as 
wondering, rational, risible animals. The views of 
Kant, Bergson, Chesterton and others will be dis- 
cussed in some detail, but there will also be an 
attempt to appreciate each work of art in its indi- 
viduality and the personal perspective each one 
brings to his/her appreciation. 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J. 
PL 476 Hume (S: 3) 

At this time, there has arisen from diverse philo- 
sophical traditions a renewed interest in Hume. 
This course will undertake to investigate Hume's 
contributions both in the epistemological and in 
the moral sphere. Thereby, Hume's study of the 
human person will emerge — a study now 
challenging contemporary thinkers. 

Richard T. Murphy 

PL 482 Political Philosophy: Hobbes to Hegel 

Through an analysis of the basic pobtical concepts 
of major thinkers like Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, 
Rousseau, Kant and Hegel, this lecture course 
aims at an introduction — both historical and 
philosophical — to current issues like technocracy, 
consumerism, the private and the public, political 



judgment, freedom of expression, etc. Not offered 
1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 489 Rousseau and Freud 

This course will focus on a reading of the major 
works of these two thinkers on the themes which 
they share — radically new accounts of the state of 
nature, the development of language and theory 
of meaning, human relationships and the relations 
between the sexes, the critique of religion, and 
proposals for improvement of modern life. Their 
work on these topics will be considered as part of 
their larger projects to construct radically differ- 
ent narratives from that of Christianity for the un- 
derstanding of human life, and in terms of their 
huge influence on modern and post-modern 
thought. Not offered 1994-95 Eileen C. Sweeney 

PL 497 Parmenides (S: 3) 

This course is an investigation of the background, 
life and philosophy of the greatest of the Greek 
philosophers before Socrates. Parmenides was 
thoroughly a man of his time; yet, against the tide 
of Greek physical speculation, he launched the 
science of metaphysics; in a polytheistic society, 
he was a monotheist; in a male-oriented society, 
he envisioned reality under the guise of a woman. 
Some elementary Greek grammar will be taught 
in conjunction with this course so that we can 
together share the authentic vision of Parmenides. 

Stuart B. Martin 

PL 501 The Image of the Infinite in the Thought 
of Meister Eckhart and Nicholas of Cusa (F: 3) 

This course will examine the role played by a par- 
ticular notion of the infinite developed in the writ- 
ings of Meister Eckhart and Nicholas of Cusa and 
its contribution to the emergence of modern 
thought. We will attempt to think through the 
way in which Eckhart's peculiar brand of 
Neoplatonic image, mysticism and negative the- 
ology are transformed in Cusanus' speculative 
doctrine of an incarnate or intensive infinity 
present in the world, which acts as the ontologi- 
cal ground of human knowledge, and how this 
anticipates in turn modern notions of progress. 

Elizabeth Brient 

PL 502 Introduction to Analytic Philosophy 

Most of the major movements and figures in 20th 
century Anglo-American philosophy fall under 
the broad and rather vague heading of analytic 
philosophy. This course intends to provide an in- 
troduction to the various forms and varieties of 
analytic (and linguistic) philosophies by examin- 
ing the main tenets and activities of some of the 
major philosophers who have been influential 
within the analytic tradition in philosophy. Not 
offered 1 994-95 Richard T. Murphy 

PL 503 Ethics in Geometry 

Two works of Husserl provide the problematic for 
this course: an essay entitled, "Origins of Geom- 
etry," and the opening chapters of Crisis of Euro- 
pean Sciences. Having considered Husserl's view of 
the history of science and of the nature of math- 
ematical knowledge, we will compare ancient and 
early modern accounts of the nature of geometry, 
its function as a paradigm of rational inquiry, and 
its place in what Husserl calls the "life-world." We 
will attempt to clarify the way different accounts 
of geometry are allied to different views of human 
nature and of the human good. Although we will 



work through some proofs, no prior mathemati- 
cal knowledge is necessary. Not offered 1994-95 

Thomas S. Hibbs 

PL 507 Marx and Nietzsche: Radical 
Alternatives in Modern Philosophy 

In this course, through a reading of Marx and 
Nietzsche's basic writings, we will examine two 
of the most innovative programs for philosophy 
in the nineteenth century. Both considered them- 
selves beyond the tradition from which they came 
and yet both were shaped by that very tradition. 
We will be particularly interested in examining 
their respective notions of critique as well as the 
way they addressed the relationship between phi- 
losophy and life. Ultimately, we will try to probe 
the question of the relationship between aesthet- 
ics and politics. David M. Rasmussen 

PL 523 The Problem of Measure and the 
Origins of the Modern Fact/Value Dichotomy 

The legitimacy of the modern notion of scientific 
progress and the ideal of objectivity that it pre- 
supposes have been brought into question by re- 
flecting on die loss of values implicit in the reduc- 
tion of our lived, experientially rich and meaning 
laden world, to a determined world of bare facts. 
These facts may be manipulated in the techno- 
logical reconstruction of the world but can never 
provide an ethical measure for human action. We 
will consider the origins of this fact/value di- 
chotomy as it arises in the epochal transition from 
the late medieval to the modern world, in an at- 
tempt to clarify the way in which the modern 
project of scientific progress depends on a pre- 
scientific conception of integrity and richness of 
reality. Elizabeth Brient 

PL 529 Philosophy of Action (S: 3) 

This course is a study of the concrete approach 
to transcendence through human action as found 
in Maurice Blondel's science of practice and its 
relation to practical science. Oliva Blanchette 

PL 532 Issues in Science and Religion 

While science and religion have often been seen 
as separate enterprises in conflict with each other, 
this course will seek to develop the ways in which 
they may interrelate and engage with each other. 
Not offered 1 994-95 Ronald Anderson, S.J. 

PL 535 Scientific Revolutions I 

This course will study the development of the Co- 
pernican revolution against the background of the 
ancient and medieval views of the universe. We 
will read selections from the original works of 
Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Kepler, along with two 
major works by Galileo, who was chiefly respon- 
sible for the consolidation of the new world view. 
Not offered 1 994-95 John J. Cleary 

PL 536 Scientific Revolutions II 

This course will continue and complete our study 
of the Copernican Revolution diat was begun in 
Scientific Revolutions I. We will read closely 
some of the key scientific works of both Descartes 
and Newton — the two central figures for the 
completion of the scientific revolution heralded 
by Copernicus. Finally, we will consider its most 
important philosophical implications as described 
in the works of Kant, who self-consciously intro- 
duced a Copernican Revolution in philosophy. 
Not offered 1 994-95 John J. Cleaiy 



48 • 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Philosophy 



PL 538 Law, Business and Society (F: 3) 

This course makes use of an interdisciplinary ap- 
proach to studying society and social issues related 
to law, business, and society, i.e., the political, 
economic and social spheres of human life. 

Francis Y. Soo 

PL 540 Philosophy of Liberation 

This is a discussion of the philosophy of libera- 
tion starting from the consciousness of oppression 
seen as a radically new starting point for educa- 
tion. The issue will be examined first in two of its 
extreme forms in Latin America (Freire) and in 
Africa (Fanon), but then will turn to an examina- 
tion of the situation closer to home in black con- 
sciousness (Alalcolm X) and in other instances of 
new demands for liberation chosen according to 
the experiences of the students participating in the 
course. Not offered 1994-95 Oliva Blancbette 

PL 544 St. Thomas Aquinas 

Prerequisites: A knowledge of Aristotelian logic 
and Aristotelian philosophical terminology, e.g., 
Kreyche's Logic for Undergraduates and Adler's 
Aristotle for Everybody. 

This course is a survey of the distinctive teach- 
ings of Aquinas' metaphysics, cosmology, anthro- 
pology, epistemology, ethics, politics, and philo- 
sophical theology. Not offered 1994-95 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 554 Philosophy of Poetry and Music (S: 3) 

This course will deal with the history of poetry, 
painting, sculpture, architecture, music and dance. 
A major perspective will be the interrelation of 
these art forms to their respective cultural peri- 
ods. Students will be encouraged to work out their 
own projects or to select studies on Eastern or 
Western Art. Joseph F. Flanagan, S.J. 

PL 560 Social and Political Crisis in Ancient 
Greece 

This is an undergraduate course that is intended 
for non-freshman students who want to get some 
historical perspective on the perennial issues in 
social and political philosophy. While keeping 
modern parallels in mind, we will study the causes 
of moral and political corruption in ancient 
Athens, that led to its eventual defeat in the 
Peloponnesian War. We will read the historical 
account of that war given by Thucydides, in or- 
der to understand both its causes and the effects 
that it had on the moral climate of 5th century 
Greece. Not offered 1994-95 John J. Cleary 

PL 562 Art and Its Significance (F: 3) 

This course will look at the relation between phi- 
losophy and art from a number of perspectives. 
We will consider a range of philosophers' views 
on the function and value of art (illusion, imita- 
tion, delight, instruction) and some recent system- 
atic theories that look more closely at the nature 
of art itself. We will also use the writings and 
manifestoes of artists themselves to illuminate 
questions about the interpretation of works of art 
and their ontological status. Ingrid II. Scheibler 

PL 563 The Great Philosophers I (F: 3) 

This course will trace two interrelated themes 
through ancient and mediaeval philosophy: the 
gradual development ofthe notion of divine tran- 
scendence, and the relation between this divine 
transcendence and human interests. 

Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 



PL 564 The Great Philosophers II (S: 3) 

This course is a continuation of the Great Phi- 
losophers I. The purpose ofthe present course is 
to exhibit philosophy as the thought of remark- 
able individuals, not as an integral part of cultural, 
social, and political life. This purpose demands 
more account of individual thought than is usu- 
ally given by historians. Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 565 Ancient Philosophy: Aesthetics (S: 3) 

The road to reality in the tradition of ancient 
philosophy takes several parallel paths: the intel- 
lectual ascent to Truth, the moral ascent to the 
Good, and the aesthetic ascent to Beauty. This 
course will wander up the aesthetic path, bring- 
ing a peculiar focus to the Greek thematization 
of reality and the capacity ofthe human mind to 
know it. Such a focus tends to favor the Platonic 
tradition, but Aristotle and his followers are 
clearly not absent from the discussion. 

Gary Gurtler, S. J. 

PL 567 Derrida: Phenomenology to 
Deconstruction 

An examination of key themes from Jacques 
Derrida's major works: his critique of traditional 
notions of objectivity and truth, his strategies for 
unmasking presuppositions, his playful style of 
textual interpretation. Particular attention will be 
paid to the impact of Derrida's thought on con- 
temporary literary theory. Not offered 1994-95 

Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 577 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (F: 3) 

An introduction to modern formal logic designed 
to familiarize students with the methods for ex- 
pressing ordinary language arguments in symbolic 
form and with the various techniques used to ana- 
lyze and evaluate the validity of arguments ex- 
pressed in symbolic form. The course will cover 
the following: propositional and predicate logic, 
some ofthe subtleties involved in the way we use 
ordinary language in reasoning, and some ofthe 
horizons of twentieth -century logic such as the in- 
teresting paradoxes of self-reference, formal sys- 
tems, and the limits of logic in human thought. 

Thomas S. Hibbs 

PL 584 C.S. Lewis (F: 3) 

Lewis wrote poetry, literary criticism, science 
fiction, fantasy, philosophy, theology, religion, lit- 
erary history, epics, children's stories, historical 
novels, short stories, psychology and politics. He 
was a rationalist and a romanticist, a classicist and 
an existentialist, a conservative and a radical, a 
pagan and a Christian. No writer of our century 
had more strings to his bow, and no one excels 
him at once in clarity, in moral force, and in 
imagination: the true, the good, and the beautiful. 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 593 Philosophy of Science (F: 3) 

An introduction to the various themes concerned 
with the interplay between philosophy and sci- 
ence. The nature of scientific explanations and die 
cognitive status of scientific theories will be con- 
sidered. The roles of induction and deduction in 
scientific discovery will be examined as well as a 
number of metaphysical questions raised by the 
natural sciences such as the ontological status of 
the various entities that make up scientific theo- 
ries. Examples will be considered from both the 
biological and physical sciences, with a particular 



focus on evolutionary theory and modern cosmo- 
logical theories about the universe. 

Patrick H. Byrne 

PL 595 Kant's Critique (F: 3) 

This course is an analysis of the major theme of 
Kant's philosophy as expressed in his first critique, 
including a study of its antecedents and conse- 
quences in the history of philosophy. 

Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J. 

PL 602 Philosophy of World Religions (S: 3) 

This course is a sympathetic, objective but exis- 
tential comparative exploration of eight of the 
world's higher religions, beginning with readings 
from each religion's own scriptures and conclud- 
ing with interpretation and discussion of ecumeni- 
cal dialog, especially between East and West. 

Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 607 Seminar: Socratic Dialectic and Christian 
Apologetics (F: 3) 

This course concerns the following issues: faith 
and reason, existence, nature and knowability of 
God; the problem of evil; predestination and free 
will; soul and immortality; heaven and hell; 
miracles and resurrection; the identity of Jesus; 
the Bible as myth versus the Bible as history; re- 
lation between religion and morality; the religious 
experience and comparative religions Eastern and 
Western. Peter J. Kreeft 

PL 608 Humanism and Anti-Humanism 

This course will examine contemporary notions 
of humanism (e.g., Sartre, Heidegger) and the 
critique that has been made of humanism by such 
thinkers as Althusser, Foucault, Derrida and 
Lacan. Nor offered 1994-95 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 61 3 Heidegger on Truth and Language (S: 3) 

Developments in contemporary philosophy have 
been influenced both by a linguistic turn and a 
critique of foundationalism. To what extent has 
Heidegger contributed to these developments? 
The course will look at a selection of Heidegger's 
writings on truth and language. We will examine 
the internal coherence of Heidegger's views as 
well as their implication for philosophy in the 
wake of metaphysics. The readings will draw on 
Heidegger's earlier as well as later writings. 

Ingrid H. Scheibler 

PL 614 Husserl and Hume 

Descartes and Hume exerted the greatest influ- 
ence on Husserl's development of phenomenol- 
ogy. This course, after beginning with a brief ex- 
position of Husserl's version ofthe phenomeno- 
logical method, will examine Hume's positive 
impact on Husserl's thought, especially in its later 
stages. Not offered 1994-95 Richard T. Murphy 

PL 61 5 British Empiricism (F: 3) 

This course introduces British empiricism 
through the epistemological theories of Locke, 
Berkeley, and Hume. Within this historical con- 
text, the representationalist theory of perception 
developed by Locke and criticized by Berkeley 
and Hume will be central. The contemporary 
discussions concerning the correct interpretation 
of these thinkers will be discussed. 

Richard T Murphy 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Philosophy • 49 



PL 620 The Eclipse of the Good: New 
Orientations in Contemporary Ethics 

This course is directed to upper-division under- 
graduate as well as graduate students. It will ex- 
amine major theories in contemporary ethics 
from the perspective diat these theories have been 
provoked by novel experiences of evil. Not offered 
1994-95 James W. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 624 Pascal and Aquinas: Reason and 
Religious Belief 

We will begin by reading selections from the 
writings of Descartes and Locke on the nature of 
reason and on religious belief. We will then turn 
to Pascal's critique of the incipient rationalism of 
early modern philosophy, a critique that is inte- 
gral to his own apology for the Christian faith. 
Having studied Pascal's position, we will turn to 
an alternative account of reason and faith found 
in Aquinas. Not offered 1994-95 

ThoTtias S. Hibbs 

PL 625 (TH 478) The Problem of Self- 
Knowledge (F: 3) 

"The unexamined life is not worth living." 
Socrates' proclamation forms the basic assump- 
tion of this course. However, important develop- 
ments in Western culture have made die approach 
to self-knowledge both more difficult and more 
essential. Students will be invited to discover in 
themselves dimensions of their subjectivity diat 
lead to resolution of fundamental issues. The 
work of Bernard Lonergan will serve as a guide. 
Joseph F. Flanagan, S.J. 

PL 626 Hannah Arendt: Learning to Love the 
World 

This course is an examination of Arendt's philo- 
sophical achievement: her treatment of the active 
life of labor, work, action, and the mind's life of 
thinking, willing and judging. The specific theme 
for the course will be this contemporary thinker's 
effort to renew a love for the world and an appre- 
ciation of the worldly traits of those who call it 
home. Not offered 1994-95 

James W. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 629 Introduction to Hermeneutics 

This course is an examination of the contempo- 
rary problem of hermeneutics in light of its 
historical antecedents. For entry-level M.A. stu- 
dents and advanced undergraduates. Not offered 
1 994-95 William J. Richardson 

PL 632 The Later Heidegger 

Prerequisite: At least two philosophy courses be- 
yond Core 

This course is an introductory reading of rep- 
resentative texts of the later period for beginning 
M.A. students and advanced undergraduate ma- 
jors. A serious knowledge of Being and Time, such 
as that gained from The Heidegger Project or its 
equivalents required. Not offered 1994-95 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 633 Metaphysics: Selected Texts 

This course is a diligent examination of selected 
classical metaphysical texts, chosen for intrinsic 
importance and for historical influence. Texts to 
be studied will vary from year to year. Proficiency 
in Greek will be an asset. Not offered 1994-95 

Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 



PL 634 The Philosophy of Jurgen Habermas 

This is a seminar on the more recent (1981 and 
later) writings of Jurgen Habermas. We will con- 
sider the following topics: the theory of commu- 
nicative action; the theory of modernity; theories 
of law and politics; aesthetics. Not offered 1994-95 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 635 William James: Pragmatism (F: 3) 

American pragmatism vigorously rejects all closed 
systems of truth in favor of a dynamic theory of 
truth-in-the-making, which justifies and encour- 
ages free human participation in the completion 
of an unfinished universe. This emphasis upon 
action makes pragmatism the most characteristic 
expression of American life, its civilization and its 
mind. A reading of selected texts from James 
should provide an introduction to this radically 
new account of how the self penetrates and is 
penetrated by the world. Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 637 Hegel's Philosophy of Law 

This seminar will consider Hegel's philosophy of 
law from both historical and contemporary per- 
spectives. The seminar will concentrate on a read- 
ing of The Philosophy of Right. Special emphasis will 
be given to Hegel's contribution to the current 
discussion of the relationship between law and 
philosophy. Not offered 1994-95 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 638 Plato: Selected Dialogues 

A study of (at most) a half-dozen Platonic dia- 
logues, chosen to suit the philosophical interests 
of instructor and students. For students with some 
background in Plato. Not offered 1994-95 

Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 640 Evolution of Greek Metaphysics 

This course is a consideration of the development 
of metaphysics from the speculations of the 
Presocratics to the systems of the Neoplatonists. 
Texts to be studied will vary from year to year, 
but the greater part of the course will be devoted 
to metaphysical texts from Plato's dialogues and 
to Aristotle's Metaphysics. Not offered 1994-95 

Arthur R. Madigan, S.J. 

PL 641 Ethics and Psychoanalysis 

This course is an examination of the ethical prob- 
lem as posed by psychoanalysis. Not offered 
1994-95 William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 649 Philosophy of Being I (F: 3) 

There is no true deconstuction without a recon- 
struction. Starting from a deconstruction of the 
metaphysical tradition, this course will attempt a 
systematic reconstruction in the philosophy of 
being. It will begin with a re-opening of the ques- 
tion of being, leading into a discussion of the anal- 
ogy and the transcendental properties of being as 
a way into an understanding of the structure of 
being as it presents itself in experience. 

Oliva Blanchette 

PL 650 Philosophy of Being II (S: 3) 

A continuation of Philosophy of Being I with an 
exploration into finite being as such, the commu- 
nication of being in the universe, and into the 
question of a totally transcendent universal cause 
of being understood as God and Creator. 

Oliva Blanchette 



PL 680 The Phenomenology of Edmund Husserl 

A study of the major themes of Husserl's early 
works: intentionality, time-consciousness, the 
interplay of experience and language, seeing as 
interpretation. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
ontological implications of phenomenology. Not 
offered 1994-95 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 691 Kant's Critique of Judgment (F: 3) 

This seminar will focus on a reading of Kant's 
famous "Third Critique" We will also consider 
contemporary readings of The Critique of Judg- 
ment. We will also be interested in the impact of 
this work on contemporary aesthetic theory and 
its contribution to recent debates on ethics, poli- 
tics and contemporary democratic theory. 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 701 Wittgenstein 

This course will present Wittgenstein against the 
historical background of the rise of Analytic phi- 
losophy and emphasize how Wittgenstein has so 
radicalized philosophical methodology that for so 
many linguistic analyses appears to be the only 
viable philosophical method. At the same time, 
the affinity of Wittgenstein's outlook to Husserl's 
phenomenology will be treated. Not offered 
1994-95 Richard T. Murphy 

PL 710 Science and Analysis in Aristotle 

Aristotle's Posterior Analytics set the standards for 
science in the West for almost 2,000 years. 
Figures as diverse as Aquinas and Avicenna, 
Descartes, Galileo and Newton all subscribed to 
fundamental Aristotelian tenants even as they 
thought of themselves as radically reforming 
them. Recent scholarship, however, has called 
into question the traditional understanding of 
what Aristotle meant by science. This course will 
take up those questions in a close, critical exami- 
nation of Aristotle's Prior Analytics and Posterior 
Analytics in relation to specifically scientific works. 
Nor offered 1 994-95 Patrick H. Byrne 

PL 711 Phenomenology 

This course is an exploration of the modern cri- 
sis of the self in Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, 
Levinas, and Ricoeur. Not offered 1994-95 

Richard M. Kearney 

PL 712 Heidegger and Husserl 

A close study of Husserl's legacy in the method, 
the structure, and in several basic concerns of 
Heidegger's fundamental ontology. Not offered 
1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 713 Aristotle's Physics and Metaphysics 

This class will have as its main goal a complete 
and careful reading of these two very difficult 
texts. Besides the main goal of making these texts 
accessible, we will also be concerned with exam- 
ining the relationship between them. Are 
Aristode's physical and metaphysical conclusions 
consistent and complementary or do they stand 
in some sort of tension with one another? 
Aristode's works on natural science and psychol- 
ogy will be considered as necessary to supplement 
our examinadon of these texts and questions. Not 
offered 1994-95 Eileen C. Sweeney 

PL 716 Aquinas and the De Unitate Intellectus 

(S:3) 

A detailed examination of the De Unitate Intellectus 
in light of the teaching of Latin Averroism on the 



50 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Philosophy 



separate Agent Intellect and the condemnation of 
that teaching in 1277. Norman J. Wells 

PL 718 Psychoanalysis and Literature (F: 3) 

This course will be a doctoral-level seminar that 
will examine various psychoanalytic approaches to 
literature as these become manifest in efforts to 
interpret psychoanalytically Edgar Allen Poe's 
short detective story, The Purloined Letter. The 
classic interpretation of this story by Marie 
Bonaparte has been followed by numerous con- 
temporary approaches such as those of Lacan, 
Derrida, Felman, Holland, Gallop, etc. 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 719 Aquinas on Law and Virtue 

Ethics has become once again a central concern 
for the understanding of human life. Before "Af- 
ter Virtue" there was Virtue. For "Legitimation 
Theory" there has to be Law. This course will 
study Aquinas' systematic approach to ethics in 
the framework of the Summa Theologiae. After a 
discussion of the structure of the Summa, it will 
focus on the concepts of Virtue and Law in Part 
II. 1 and on the Particular Virtues as elaborated 
in Part II.2. Nor offered 1994-95 

Oliva Blanch ette 

PL 720 Plato's Theory of Knowledge 

Central works in understanding Plato's theory of 
knowledge are the Theaetetus and the Sophist. In 
one, he gives a theory of perception that excludes 
explicit reference to the Forms and in the other a 
description of the Forms independent of their 
relation to sensible objects. This presents the 
reader with the problem of discerning whether 
these two complementary dialogues are part of a 
unified theory, how they relate to other Platonic 
dialogues and the purpose behind Plato's unusual 
philosophical method. Not offered 1994-95 

Gary M. Gurtler, S.J. 

PL 721 Philosophy and Tragedy: Hegel to 
Nietzsche 

The general topic of the course is philosophy and 
literature. The course intends to be a close tex- 
tual analysis as well as a critical appraisal of two 
typical and opposite approaches to Greek tragedy; 
namely, a Hegelian one based on the principle 
that tragedy already anticipates metaphysics; and 
a Nietzschean one based on the principle that 
metaphysics is blind towards the naming of trag- 
edy. Not offered 1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 728 Michel Foucault 

This course will study the works of Michel Fou- 
cault. We will examine his philosophical analysis 
of several modern forms of knowledge (psychol- 
ogy, medicine, penology, sexology) and the rela- 
tionship of these human sciences to models of 
rationality and modes of political action. Not of- 
fered 1994-95 J nines W. Bernauer, S.J. 

PL 733 Ethics: Universalist Versus 
Communitarian 

This course is an examination of the current de- 
bate between the universalist tradition in ethics 
as represented by I labermas, Apel, and Rawls 
versus the communitarian tradition in ethics as 
represented by Williams, Sandel, Walzer, 
Maclntyre, and others. Not offered 1994-95 

David M. Rasmussen 



PL 734 Hannah Arendt: Destruction of 
Metaphysics 

This course will discuss the theme of the destruc- 
tion of metaphysics in Arendt's The Life of the 
Mind. Not offered 1994-95 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 735 Jurisprudence and Philosophy (S: 3) 

We will consider contemporary approaches to 
philosophy and law with particular emphasis on 
Facticity and Validity by Jurgen Habermas. 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 748 Discovery of Social Philosophy in Young 
Hegel (F: 3) 

Hegel can be viewed as the father of modern so- 
cial philosophy in his early criticism of both em- 
piricism and formalism in the treatment of natu- 
ral law as exemplified in British contractarian 
theory and Kantian formalism. In this he can also 
be viewed as the first post-modern. This seminar 
will study how he came to his social philosophy, 
which finds its final expression in the Philosophy 
of Right, in the so-called Essay on Natural Law of 
1 802 , the System of Ethical Life of 1 802 -03 , and the 
Phenomenology of Spirit of 1805-07. 

Oliva Blanchette 

PL 749 Plotinus and Augustine 

The course will compare the thought of Plotinus 
and Augustine whose texts mark the transition 
from ancient to medieval philosophy, from pagan- 
ism to Christianity. We will read portions of 
Plotinus' Enneads, with particular emphasis on the 
themes of hierarchy, participation, embodiment, 
temporality, dialectic and narrative, beauty, and 
contemplation. We will then analyze passages in 
Augustine where Plotinian language figures 
prominently. Finally, we will consider Augustine's 
transformation in the Confessions of the previously 
mentioned Plotinian motifs. Not offered 1994-95 

Thomas S. Hihbs 

PL 751 Medieval Philosophy I: Augustine to 
Anselm 

This is a detailed examination of the classical 
positions taken on faith and reason, knowledge, 
God and man. Not offered 1994-95 

Norman J. Wells 

PL 752 Medieval Philosophy II: Bonaventure to 
Ockham 

This is a continuation of the previous semester, 
PL 7 5 1 . Nor offered 1 994-95 Norman J. Wells 

PL 754 Problems in Cartesian Studies 

A seminar course devoted to a detailed examina- 
tion of the objections to the Meditations and 
Descartes responses thereto. Not offered 1994-95 

Norman J. Wells 

PL 758 The Early Works of Levinas 

This is a study of the ethical philosophy of 
Emmanuel Levinas with emphasis on his critique 
of Heidegger. Not offered 1994-95 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 761 Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit 

This is a textual analysis, with special attention to 
method, structure, and the social dimensions of 
spirit. Not offered 1 994-95 Oliva Blanchette 

PL 762 Soren Kierkegaard 

This course will deal primarily with the early 
pseudonymous writings of Soren Kierkegaard. 
The following topics will be emphasized: (1) the 



function of irony and indirect communication in 
the pseudonymous works, (2) the significance of 
the stages of existence, and (3) the nature of the 
relationship which Kierkegaard posits between 
language, self-understanding, and human au- 
tonomy. Not offered 1994-95 

Vanessa P. Rumble 

PL 768-769 Insight (F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a two-semester course exploring the basic 
themes and method of Lonergan's Insight, 
through a close textual reading. 

Patrick H. Byrne 

PL 772 Heidegger: The Principle of Reason 

This is a close reading of Heidegger's recently 
translated lecture course, "The Principle of Rea- 
son (1956)," comparing it with his earlier essay, 
"On the Essence of Ground (1929)," and other 
cognate texts. Not offered 1994-95 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 774 Beyond Aristotle's Physics (F: 3) 

It is a well-known fact that the term metaphysics is 
derived from Andronicus and Rhodes, and that 
Aristotle himself called the science either theol- 
ogy or first philosophy (as distinct from physics, 
which is sometimes called second philosophy). 
Yet, the implied ordering of Aristotle's texts (i.e., 
of the Metaphysics after the Physics) is generally 
agreed to correspond with the author's intentions, 
though many different reasons for this order have 
been given throughout the ages. In this graduate 
seminar, we will reconsider the relationship be- 
tween Aristotle's Physics and his Metaphysics with 
reference to his division of the theoretical sciences 
(physics, mathematics, and metaphysics). We will 
consider the medieval tradition of interpretation 
and compare it with contemporary Aristotelian 
scholarship, but our primary task will be to come 
to terms with the texts themselves and their in- 
ternal relationship. John J. Cleary 

PL 775 Studies in Thomistic Psychology (S: 3) 

This is a study of basic themes in Aquinas' philo- 
sophical psychology. Topics to be considered are 
the following: the relationship between logic and 
psychology; sensation and abstraction; the unity 
of soul and body; the soul's knowledge of itself; 
the immateriality of the soul. Texts will be taken 
from Aquinas' commentaries on Aristotle's Phys- 
ics and DeAnima, and from the Summa Contra 
Gentiles. Thomas S. Hibbs 

PL 776 Debates in Hermeneutic Imagination 

This course explores how the concept of 
hermeneutic imagination evolves from the work 
of Heidegger and Gadamer to the recent work of 
Paul Ricoeur (Self as Another, Time and Na?rative, 
From Text to Action). It also discusses the critiques 
of hermeneutic imagination by Derrida and 
Lyotard, particularly as it relates to the dialectic 
between ethics and poetics. Not offered 1994-95 

Richard M. Kearney 

PL 777 Descartes and the Cartesian Tradition 

(F:3) 

A close analysis of the classical Cartesian positions 
on the self, God and the world as they are dis- 
cussed in the Meditations. Norman J. Wells 

PL 782 Philosophy of Language (F: 3) 

This course will focus on the major strands in 
twentieth century philosophy of language, 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Philosophy • 51 



beginning with Bertrand Russell and ending with 
Jacques Derrida. Along the way we will study the 
views of LA. Richards, Ludwig Wittgenstein, 
Kenneth Burke, J. L. Austin, and Paul Ricouer. 

Eileen C. Sweeney 

PL 783 Phenomenology of Desire: Hegel to 
Levinas (S: 3) 

This course examines a number of modern phi- 
losophies of desire from Hegel's Phenomenology of 
Spirit and Kierkegaard's Banquet (a parody of 
Plato's Symposium) to more recent accounts of 
eros in Sartre's Being and Nothingness, Ricoeur's 
Freud and Philosophy, and Levinas' Totality and 
Infinity. Richard M. Kearney 

PL 784 Introduction to Husserl's Transcendental 
Phenomenology (S: 3) 

This course introduces Husserl's later form of 
transcendental phenomenology by following the 
"way through ontology." In seeking to found for- 
mal logic and ontology and the a priori ontologi- 
cal structure of the "life-world," Husserl invoked 
that phenomenological reduction to transcenden- 
tal subjectivity characteristic of his later phenom- 
enology. Whether such a reduction is feasible or 
legitimate will be questioned. 

Richard T. Murphy 

PL 796 Seminar: Hegel's Logic 

This is a textual analysis of the first part of Hegel's 
System, starting from the Logic of Being and mov- 
ing into the Logic of Essence, with special attention 
given to the method of Hegel's thought. Open 
only to graduate students. Not offered 1994-95 

Oliva Blanchette 

PL 797 Seminar: Hegel's Logic II 

This is a textual analysis of the Logic of Concept as 
the culmination of Hegel's Logic leading into the 
Philosophy of Nature. Not offered 1994-95 

Oliva Blanchette 

PL 799 Readings and Research (F: 3-S: 3) 

By arrangement The Department 

PL 801 Thesis Seminar (F: 3-S: 3) 

A research course under the guidance of a faculty 
member for those writing a Master's Thesis. 

The Department 

PL 802 Thesis Direction (F: 0-S: 0) 

This is a non-credit course for those who have 
received six credits for Thesis Seminar but who 
have not finished their thesis. This course must 
be registered for and the continuation fee paid 
each semester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 
PL 805 The World of the Presocratics (F: 3) 
This graduate seminar will attempt to explore the 
philosophical world of the Presocratic thinkers 
from Thales to Anaxagoras. We will begin with a 
brief survey of the leading Ionian thinkers, includ- 
ing Pythagoras, and then consider Heraclitus as 
the discoverer of the soul who reacted against this 
kind of cosmology. The core of the seminar will 
consist of a detailed examination of the long poem 
of Parmenides, together with a consideration of 
the famous paradoxes of Zeno as a codicil to the 
Parmenidean world-view. Subsequent thinkers, 
like Empedocles and Democritus, will be inter- 
preted as trying to answer the Parmenidean chal- 
lenge but in their different ways. John J. Cleaiy 



PL 806 Kant's Third Critique 

This is a close, textual examination of Kant's Third 
Critique and its subsequent influence in the his- 
tory of art criticism. Not offered 1994-95 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 807 Kant's Transcendental Idealism (F: 3) 

Kant developed the notion of a transcendental 
subjectivity in which could be grounded the ob- 
jective validity of the sciences and experience it- 
self. He attempted to construct no less than an a 
priori metaphysics of experience. We shall follow 
Kant textually in this endeavor. 

Richard T. Murphy 

PL 81 1 Dynamic Economy and Human Good 

After completing his work on method in theol- 
ogy, the late Bernard Lonergan, S.J., turned his 
attention to the ethical problems posed by the 
modern styles of economics. In particular, he was 
concerned with the problems posed by the tran- 
sition from relatively stable traditional economies 
to dynamic economics characterized by ongoing 
innovation, capital formation and cycles of pros- 
perity followed by recession. This course will 
draw upon Lonergan's late writings on these top- 
ics. In particular the economic problems will be 
related to Lonergan's more comprehensive 
framework of human history as a developing hu- 
man good. Not offered 1994-95 

Patrick H. Byrne 

PL 81 8 Heidegger on Art 

A textual and contextual analysis of Heidegger's 
essay on "The Origin of the Work of Art." Not 
offered 1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 819 Kant and Hegel on Art 

Textual examination of Kant's Third Critique and 
its influence on Hegel's Philosophy of Art. Not 
offered 1994-95 Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 820 Reason and Faith in Hegel, 
Kierkegaard, Blondel 

Starting from an examination of how infinity pre- 
sents itself in each of these authors, the seminar 
will study how each proceeds in philosophy of 
religion and in the question of the relation be- 
tween reason and faith. Not offered 1994-95 

Oliva Blanchette 

PL 824 Arendt and Heidegger 

This is a close study of The Human Condition and 
The Life of the Mind with emphasis on Arendt's 
critique on Heidegger. Not offered 1994-95 

Jacques M. Taminiaux 

PL 828 Deconstruction and Critical Theory: 

Habermas/Derrida 

This course will evaluate the similarities and 
differences between critical theory and 
deconstruction by comparing the work of Jurgen 
Habermas and Jacques Derrida. Emphasis will be 
placed on their respective orientations to modern 
philosophy. Not offered 1994-95 

David M. Rasmussen 

PL 832 Philosophy and Theology in Aquinas 

(S: 3) 

A study of how Aquinas comes to understand the- 
ology as a scientific discipline that has to use phi- 
losophy to make the truth of revelation manifest. 
Special attention will be given to methodological 
discussions at the beginning of the various parts 
of the Summa Theologiae and the Summa Contra 



Gentiles, as well as to the order of both theology 
and philosophy as he understood them. An at- 
tempt will be made to show how the commentar- 
ies on Artistotle, in which he is most properly 
himself a philosopher, are an essential part of his 
being as a theologian. Oliva Blanchette 

PL 834 Lonergan's Economics 

This course will concentrate on the study of 
Lonergan's economics manuscript on circulation 
analysis and situate the good of order as economic 
within the overall framework of the human good. 
Not offered 1994-95 Patrick H. Byrne 

Frederick G. Lawrence 

PL 84 1 The Structure of Finite Being 

This is a detailed analysis of the famous contro- 
versy on essence and existence and the problem 
of their distinction. The role of Suarez as an his- 
torian and critic of the "real distinction" will be 
examined. Nor offered 1994-95 

Norman J. Wells 

PL 855 Seminar: Heidegger I (F: 3) 

This course is a close textual analysis of Being and 
Time, focusing on Heidegger's epochal insights 
on man, world, time and being. 

Thomas J. Owens 

PL 856 Seminar: Heidegger II (S: 3) 

This is a continuation of the fall semester course 
(PL 855) and open only to students who have 
participated in that course. Thomas J. Owens 

PL 868 Kant's Ethics 

Prerequisites: Solid knowledge of Kant, Critique of 
Pure Reason 

This is an examination of Kant's ethical sys- 
tem with a focus on the capacity to deal with radi- 
cal evil. Not offered 1994-95 

William J. Richardson, S.J. 

PL 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

PL 900 Husserl's Logical Investigations 

This is a critical examination of the principal 
themes from Edmund Husserl's greatest work: his 
critique of psychologism and of British empiri- 
cism, his theory of meaning and reference, his 
account of the relationship between judgment and 
truth, and his revitalization of Aristotle's theories 
of substance and essence. An effort will be made 
to relate Husserl to Frege, Wittgenstein, and the 
contemporary analytic tradition. Not offered 
1994-95 Richard Cobb-Stevens 

PL 990 Teaching Seminar (S: 3) 

This course is required of all first- and second- 
year doctoral candidates. This course includes 
discussion of teaching techniques, planning of 
curricula, and careful analysis of various ways of 
presenting major philosophical texts. 

Richard Cobb-Stevens 



52 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Physics 



Physics 



FACULTY 

George J. Goldsmith, Professor Emeritis; B.S., 
University of Vermont; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

Frederick E. White, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
Boston University; B.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Solomon L. Schwebel, Associate Professor 
Emeritus; B.S., City College of New York; M.S., 
Ph.D., New York University 

Francis A. Liuima, S.J., Assistant Professor 
Emeritus; M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., St. Louis 
University 

Robert L. Carovillano, Professor; A.B., Rutgers 
University; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Joseph H. Chen, Professor; B.S., Saint Procopius 
College; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Baldassare Di Bartolo, Professor; Dott. Ing., 
University of Palermo; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

David A. Broido, Associate Professor; B.S., 
University of California, Santa Barbara; Ph.D., 
University of California, San Diego 

Krzysztof Kempa, Associate Professor; M.S., 
Technical University of Wroclaw; Ph.D., 
University of Wroclaw 

Rein A. Uritam, Associate Professor; Chairperson 
of the Department; A.B., Concordia College; 
A.B., Oxford University; A.M., Ph.D., Princeton 
University 

Michael J. Graf, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Sc.M., Ph.D., 
Brown University 

Pradip M. Bakshi, Research Professor; B.S., 
University of Bombay; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Gabor Kalman, Research Professor; D.Sc, Israel 
Institute of Technology 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department offers comprehensive programs 
of study and research leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Science in 
Teaching (M.S.T.), and Doctor of Philosophy 
(Ph.D.). Courses emphasize the basic principles 
of physics and prepare students to choose a ma- 
jor field of concentration according to their in- 
terests and abilities. Students intending to under- 
take experimental research are expected to de- 
velop, primarily on their own initiative, the spe- 
cial technical skills required of an experimental- 
ist. Students intending to undertake theoretical 
research need not develop laboratory skills, but 
they are expected to demonstrate by outstanding 
achievements in course work their special aptitude 
for analysis. 



Master's Program 

Each candidate for a Master's degree must pass a 
qualifying examination (Master's Comprehensive) 
administered by the Department and meet speci- 
fied course and credit requirements. The quali- 
fying examination shall be prepared by a commit- 
tee of at least three faculty members appointed by 
the Chairperson and usually shall be administered 
each September. This committee shall evaluate 
the qualifying examinations in conjunction with 
the graduate faculty. Generally no more than 
three (3) credits of PH 799 Readings and Research 
may be applied to any Master's program. The 
M.S. degree is available -with or -without a thesis, 
and the M.S.T. requires a paper but no thesis. 

M.S. With Thesis 

This program requires thirty (30) credits that 
normally consist of twenty-seven (27) credits of 
course work plus three (3) thesis credits (PH 801). 
Required courses include the following: PH 711, 
PH 72 1, PH 732, PH 741 and PH 707-708. The 
qualifying examination is essentially based on the 
contents of the first four required courses and is 
usually taken at the first opportunity following the 
completion of these courses. The M.S. thesis re- 
search is performed under the direction of a full- 
time member of the graduate faculty, professional 
or research staff. A submitted thesis shall have at 
least two faculty readers, including the director, 
assigned by the Chairperson. The thesis is ac- 
cepted after the successful completion of a pub- 
lic oral examination conducted by the readers. 

M.S. Without Thesis 

This program requires thirty-six (36) credits of 
course work. The same courses and qualifying ex- 
amination requirements for the M.S. with thesis 
apply here except that in addition the courses 
PH 722, PH 733, and PH 742 are required. 

M.S.T. Degree 

The M.S.T. Degree is offered in cooperation with 
the Graduate School of Education. This program 
requires at least fifteen (1 5) credits from graduate 
or upper divisional undergraduate courses 
in physics. These credits will most often 
include two of the following courses: 
PH 711, PH 721, PH 732, PH 741. The 
M.S.T. qualifying examination in physics will be 
based upon the student's actual course program. 
A research paper supervised by a full-time 
member of the graduate faculty is required. The 
student must also satisfy the requirements of the 
Graduate School of Education, whose listings 
should be consulted for information. 

Doctoral Program 

A student generally enters the doctoral program 
upon faculty recommendation after passing the 
M.S. qualifying examination. Students entering 
Boston College with previous graduate experience 
may be exempted from the qualifying examina- 
tion by recommendation of the Graduate Affairs 
Committee with approval by the Chairperson. 
Unless a waiver is granted, a student wishing to 
enter the doctoral program must pass the quali- 
fying examination. 



Upon entering the doctoral program, each 
student shall select a field of specialization and 
establish a working relationship with a member 
of the faculty. With the approval of a faculty 
member, who normally shall be the principal ad- 
visor, the student shall inform the Chairperson of 
this major field selection and the Chairperson 
shall appoint, with the approval of the Depart- 
ment, a faculty Doctoral Committee consisting of 
at least two full-time faculty members to advise 
and direct the student through the remainder of 
his or her graduate studies. 

Requirements 

Required courses for the doctorate are the follow- 
ing: PH 722, PH 733, PH 742 and four additional 
courses in distinct areas chosen from the gradu- 
ate electives of the Department or from other 
graduate departments with the approval of the 
Chairperson. PH 761 and PH 771 are very 
strongly recommended as two of these four 
courses. 

Some teaching or equivalent educational ex- 
perience is required. This requirement may be 
satisfied by at least one year of service as a teach- 
ing assistant or by suitable teaching duties. Ar- 
rangements are made with each student for a 
teaching program best suited to his or her over- 
all program of studies. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Within two years of entering the doctoral pro- 
gram, each student must take the Comprehensive 
Examination, usually offered each September. 
This examination, in principle, covers all of phys- 
ics that a doctoral student can be expected to know 
at the end of two years of formal course work in 
the doctoral curriculum; however, it will stress 
classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum 
mechanics, and statistical physics. The examina- 
tion has both a written and an oral part. The ex- 
amination is prepared and administered by a fac- 
ulty committee, appointed by the Chairperson, 
and the examination is evaluated by this commit- 
tee, with approval of the entire graduate faculty 
of the Department. 

Research Area Examination 

Within three months of passing the Comprehen- 
sive Examination, a student must take the Re- 
search Area Examination. This examination is 
prepared and administered by the student's Doc- 
toral Committee, and it covers topics agreed to 
by the student and his/her Doctoral Committee 
as appropriate to prepare the student for research 
work in his/her area of interest. The examination 
is evaluated by the Doctoral Committee, with 
approval of the entire graduate faculty of the 
Department. A student may attempt the exami- 
nation twice under the direction of the same 
Doctoral Committee. 

A student who has passed the Comprehensive 
Examination and the Research Area Examination, 
in addition to the course requirements, becomes 
a doctoral candidate. 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Physics • S3 



Thesis 

In consultation with the Doctoral Committee 
each student must submit the completed Outline 
of Thesis form to the Chairperson. An open meet- 
ing shall be scheduled at which the student shall 
discuss the thesis proposal. The Doctoral Com- 
mittee, with the approval of the Chairperson, shall 
decide upon accepting the proposal. 

The Chairperson shall recommend to the 
Dean the appointment of a Doctoral Thesis Com- 
mittee consisting of at least three Department 
members (including the student's Doctoral Com- 
mittee) and an external examiner, where feasible, 
to read and evaluate the completed thesis and to 
conduct an open meeting at which the thesis is 
defended in an oral examination. The thesis is 
accepted when endorsed on the official title page 
by the Doctoral Thesis Committee after the oral 
examination. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Waivers of Departmental requirements, if not in 
violation of graduate school requirements, may be 
granted by recommendation of the Graduate Af- 
fairs Committee with approval of the Chairper- 
son. 

A variety of theoretical studies are conducted 
within the Department in areas such as space 
physics, plasma physics, and astrophysics, atmo- 
spheric physics, elementary particles, and current 
algebras, solid state and mathematical physics. 

Experimental programs are mainly in solid 
state and space physics. Research in solid state 
physics includes the following: superconductivity, 
heavy fermion systems, low-temperature physics, 
strong magnetic fields, crystal field studies using 
spin resonance, spectroscopic and Mossbauer 
techniques; absorption and fluorescence spectros- 
copy of solids; energetic radiation effects on the 
dielectric and optical properties of ionic crystals; 
electroreflectance in semi-conductors; transport 
properties of alloys; optical and electrical prop- 
erties of plasmas in solids. Research is conducted 
in the field of gas kinetics by means of flash pho- 
tolysis techniques. Space research includes a va- 
riety of experimental projects and related data 
analysis efforts. These include auroral and airglow 
physics; space charge effects in satellite environ- 
ments; electric current and field configurations at 
high latitudes; and radar studies of the upper at- 
mosphere and ionosphere. 

Boston College is a participating institution 
for available government fellowships and grants. 
The Department also offers scholarship and 
teaching assistantship aid to qualified students. 
Student research assistantships are often available 
to advanced students in space physics, atmo- 
spheric physics, and solid state physics during the 
summer as well as the academic year. 

A diagnostic examination is administered to all 
entering students to assist in preparing course 
schedules and detecting deficiencies that should 
be remedied. 

Foreign students are required and other ap- 
plicants are encouraged to take the GRE Aptitude 
Test and Advanced Test and to have the scores 
submitted as part of their application. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

With approval, courses numbered in the 600s may 
be elected by graduate students for credit. 

Graduate Courses 

PH 700 Physics Colloquium (F, S: no credit) 

This is a weekly discussion of current topics in 
physics. No academic credit. No fee. 

PH 707-708 Physics Graduate Seminar I, II 

This is a discussion of topics in physics from the 
current literature. Offered 1995-96 

PH 71 1 Classical Mechanics (F: 4) 

Considered are the following: Lagrange's and 
Hamilton's equations; principle of Least Action; 
invariance principles; rigid body motion; canoni- 
cal transformations; Hamilton-Jacobi theory; spe- 
cial theory of relativity; small oscillations; con- 
tinuous media. Pradip M. Bakshi 

PH 721 Statistical Physics I (S: 3) 

This course considers the classical laws and con- 
cepts of thermodynamics with selected applica- 
tions; kinetic and statistical basis of thermody- 
namics; H-Theorem; the Boltzmann transport 
equation; transport phenomena. Gabor Kalman 

PH 722 Statistical Physics II (F: 3) 

This is a survey of the fundamental principles of 
classical and quantum statistics; kinetic theory; 
statistical basis of thermodynamics; selected ap- 
plications. Gabor Kalman 

PH 732 Electromagnetic Theory I (S: 4) 

Considered are the following: physical bases 
for Maxwell's equations; electrostatics and 
magnetostatics; multipole moments; energy and 
momentum conservation for the electromagnetic 
field; wave phenomena; point charge motion in 
external fields. Baldassare DiBartolo 

PH 733 Electromagnetic Theory II (F: 4) 

This course surveys radiation theory; gauge 
choices and transformations; Lienard-Wiechert 
potentials; dispersion and scattering theory; spe- 
cial theory of relativity; covariant electrodynam- 
ics; spin and angular momentum of the electro- 
magnetic field and selected applications. 

The Department 

PH 735-736 Techniques of Experimental 
Physics I, II (F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a laboratory course in contemporary tech- 
niques of experimental physics and materials sci- 
ence. Experimental studies will be conducted in 
the optical, transport, and electrical properties of 
semiconductors, fluors, insulators and metals. 
Coherent and incoherent light sources; photo- 
emissive, photoconductive, and photovoltaic 
transducers; analog-to-digital and digital-to-ana- 
log converters; microcomputer interfaces; elec- 
trometers; lock-in detectors; spectrometers; cryo- 
stats; and laboratory magnets represent the kinds 
of apparatus that will be involved. The course will 
meet for six hours per week of laboratory work 
and one hour of lecture. George Goldsmith 

PH 741 Quantum Mechanics I (F: 4) 

Considered are the following: fundamental con- 
cepts; bound states and scattering theory; the 
Coulomb field; perturbation theory; angular 
momentum and spin; symmetry and the Pauli 
principle. Baldassare DiBartolo 



PH 742 Quantum Mechanics II (S: 4) 

Considered are the following: interaction of ra- 
diation with matter; selection rules; second quan- 
tization; Dirac theory of die electron; scattering 
theory. Pradip M. Bakshi 

PH 761 Solid State Physics I (F: 3) 

Considered are the following: crystal structure 
and bonding; diffraction and the reciprocal lattice; 
thermal properties and lattice vibrations; die free- 
electron model; energy bands in solids; semicon- 
ductor theory and devices. The Department 

PH 771 Plasma and Space Physics (S: 3) 

This course examines comprehensively the 
plasma state of matter, with an emphasis on space 
and astrophysical conditions. Topics include ba- 
sic plasma concepts (Debye length, plasma oscil- 
lations, etc.), kinetic theory as it applies to the 
plasma state (plasma kinetics), and magnetofluid 
dynamics. Selected applications from magneto- 
spheric, astro, space, or ionospheric physics are 
chosen to illustrate the four main topics of the 
course: plasma transport phenomena, thermal and 
radiative processes in plasmas, plasma waves and 
instabilities, and electromagnetic waves in 
plasmas. The Department 

PH 799 Readings and Research in Physics 
(F, S: credits by arrangement) 

By arrangement. The Department 

PH 801 Physics Thesis Research (F: 3-S: 3) 

A research problem of an original and investiga- 
tive nature. The Department 

PH 802 Physics Thesis Direction (F: 0-S: 0) 

This is a non-credit course for those who have 
received six credits for Thesis Research but who 
have not finished their thesis. This course must 
be registered for and the continuation fee paid 
each semester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 

PH 835 Mathematical Physics (F: 3) 

This course considers the following: matrix alge- 
bra, linear vector spaces; orthogonal functions and 
expansions; boundary value problems; introduc- 
tion to Green's functions. Pradip M. Bakshi 

PH 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

PH 910 Seminar: Topics in Physics 

This is a seminar course on topics in theoretical 
or experimental physics given in accordance with 
current research interests or needs of the students 
and faculty of the department. Not offered 
1994-95 The Department 

PH 934 Electromagnetic Theory III 

This course is a continuation and extension of 
classical electromagnetism to the quantum theory 
of light. Topics include Planck's theory of radia- 
tion; Einstein's A and B coefficients; Kramers- 
Kronig relations; statistical and coherence prop- 
erties of light; quantization of the radiation field; 
the optics of photons; and the theory of the laser. 
Not offered 1994-95 



54 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Political Science 



PH 950 Group Theory 

Considered are the following: basic concepts; 
point symmetry groups; selected applications in 
quantum and elementary particle theory. Nor 
offered 1994-95 

PH 970 Quantum Mechanics III 

This course surveys formal theory of scattering 
of Dirac particles; quantum electrodynamics; 
S-matrix theory; generalized symmetry principles 
and conservation laws. Not offered 1994-95 

PH 975 Many Body Physics 

This course is an introduction to the methods and 
basic physical processes in many body physics. 
Emphasis is on the comparison of various physi- 
cal systems and on modern approximation 



methods; noninteracting and interacting Fermi 
and Bose systems; electron gas; nuclear matter; su- 
perconducting Fermi systems; response functions 
and many body Green function methods. 
Not offered 1994-95 

PH 980 Elementary Particle Physics 

Considered are the following: properties and sys- 
tematics of elementary particles; scattering; de- 
cays; resonances; symmetry principles; classifica- 
tion schemes; theory of strong, weak and electro- 
magnetic interactions; field theory and recent 
developments are included. Not offered 1994-95 

PH 992 Advanced Topics in Mathematical 
Physics 

Emphasis will be on systematic development of 
mathematical techniques, with wide-ranging 



applications to important physical problems serv- 
ing to illustrate the underlying essential common 
features. Particular topics to be covered will de- 
pend on the interests of the audience. Not offered 
1994-95 

PH 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F: 0-S: 0) 

For students who have not yet passed the Doc- 
toral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the 
status of a non-matriculating student for the one 
or two semesters used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

PH 999 Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. 



Political Science 



FACULTY 

Peter S. H. Tang, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
National Chengchih University; A.M., Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

Christopher J. Bruell, Professor; A.B., Cornell 
University; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Robert K. Faulkner, Professor; A.B., Dartmouth 
College; A.B., Oxford University; A.M., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

Donald L. Hafher, Professor; A.B., Kalamazoo 
College; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Marc K. Landy, Professor; A.B., Oberlin College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

David Lowenthal, Professor; A.B., Brooklyn 
College; B.S., New York University; A.M., Ph.D., 
New School for Social Research 

Marvin C. Rintala, Professor; A.B., University of 
Chicago; A.M., Ph.D., Fletcher School of Law 
and Diplomacy 

Kay L. Schlozman, Professor; A.B., Wellesley 
College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

William Schneider, O'Neill Professor; B.A., 
Brandeis College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Robert Scigliano, Professor; A.B., A.M., 
University of California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago 

Donald S. Carlisle, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Brown University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

David A. Deese, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Dartmouth College; M.A., M.A.L.D., Ph.D., 
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy 

Dennis Hale, Associate Professor; Chairperson of 
the Department; A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., 
City University 

David R. Manwaring, Associate Professor; A.B., 
A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin 

Robert S. Ross, Associate Professor; B.A., Tufts 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 



Susan M. Shell, Associate Professor; B.A., Cornell 
University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

John T. Tierney, Associate Professor; A.B., Johns 
Hopkins University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Kenji Hzyao, Assistant Professor; A.B., Dartmouth 
College; Ph.D., University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor 

Duane Oldfield, Assistant Professor; B.A., Reed 
College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California 

Jennie Purnell, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Dartmouth; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Department offers advanced study in Ameri- 
can politics, comparative politics, international re- 
lations, and political philosophy. It displays a dis- 
tinctive blend of philosophical and practical con- 
cerns within a tradition of friendly debate and 
scholarly exchange. Seminars and courses are 
supplemented by individual readings and infor- 
mal gatherings. Both the Master's and Doctoral 
programs are flexible as to fields and courses, and 
they allow students to study in other departments 
and at other universities around Boston. 

Master of Arts Degree 

The Master's program requires ten courses with 
at least one course taken in three of the 
Department's four fields (American Politics, 
Comparative Politics, International Relations, 
and Political Theory). The passing of a compre- 
hensive examination completes the requirements 
of the program. A student is allowed to take two 
or, with permission, three courses in other depart- 
ments, and may also receive credit for two courses 
or for writing a thesis. If a student chooses to write 
a thesis, the written part of the comprehensive 
examination is waived. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The program entails sixteen courses (three or four 
a semester) about half of which, taken in a single 



field, constitute minors. Study done in another 
department may be counted toward the major, or 
may be substituted for one of the minors. Special 
fields of a student's devising may be offered in 
place of regular fields when appropriate. Students 
must also demonstrate reading proficiency in one 
foreign language, modern or ancient. 

Admissions 

All applications must be completed by February 
15. 

Financial Aid 

The Department has several renewable grants for 
entering doctoral students. They carry full tuition 
remission and a stipend, which is partly a fellow- 
ship and partly a research or teaching assistant- 
ship. It also has a Thomas P. O'Neill Fellowship 
for an entering doctoral student interested in 
American Politics. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Graduate Seminars 

PO 702 Field Seminar (F: 3) 

This seminar is intended to provide graduate stu- 
dents with a general intellectual survey of the field 
of American government and politics. In terms of 
the topics it covers, it is not unlike an introduc- 
tory American government course, but its intel- 
lectual agenda is different, focusing on prominent 
scholarly debates, lines of inquiry, and perspec- 
tives. It is taught by all of the department's Ameri- 
can government faculty; each of whom takes a 
two-week segment of the course for his or her spe- 
cialty. Among the topics considered are the 
founding, the judiciary, the Constitution and the 
Courts, current Constitutional issues, American 
political thought (20th century), Federalism, 
Congress, the bureaucracy, the presidency, pub- 
lic policy, changing party alignments, organized 
interests, party organization and elections and 
social movements. Kay L. Schlozman 

PO 706 The American Founding (F: 3) 

A study of the founding of the American regime, 
including the Constitutional Convention 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Political Science • 55 



discussions, the Federalist, Anti-Federalist writ- 
ings, and the writings of leading founders. 

Robert Scigliano 

PO 709 American Judiciary (S: 3) 

An inquiry into the organization and processes of 
the judicial system of the United States, includ- 
ing prominent literature on the subject. 

Robert Scigliano 

PO 902 Political Economy II (S: 3) 

The second semester begins with Marx. The rest 
of the semester is devoted to various American 
and continental responses to Marxism in particu- 
lar and industrialism generally. Among the 
schools of thought and thinkers to be considered 
are the following: Populism, Pragmatism, Pro- 
gressivism, Polanyi, De Jouvenel, Schumpeter, 
Keynes and contemporary rational choice theory. 

Marc Landy 

PO 904 Politics and the Bible (S: 3) 

This course is an examination of the political 
teachings of the Bible and their implications. The 
emphasis is on the contrast between the biblical 
and the philosophic understandings of politics, as 
well as between the Jewish and Christian under- 
standings of the same problem. 

Christopher J. Bruell 

PO 914 Plato's Symposium (F: 3) 

Christopher J. Bruell 

PO 919 Political Philosophy of Bacon (S: 3) 

This course is a study of several shorter works on 
science, politics, and law. Robert K. Faulkner 

PO 929 Montaigne's Essays (F: 3) 

A close reading of selected essays for their moral 
and political principles. David Lowenthal 

PO 946 Hegel (F: 3) 

Susan Shell 
PO 954 Mores Utopia (S: 3) 

This course includes a reading of this famous 
counterpart to Plato's Republic. 

David Lowenthal 

Graduate-Undergraduate Seminars 

PO 359 Seminar: Religion in American Politics 
(F:3) 

This seminar will examine key questions concern- 
ing the relationship between religion and politics 
in the United States. What is the proper line, if 
any, that should separate religious and political 
activities? How has conflict among religious 
groups helped shape American political develop- 
ment? How are religious and partisan divisions 
related? Does American religion work to support 
or undermine the functioning of American de- 
mocracy? Duane Oldfield 

PO 376 Seminar: Current Constitutional Issues 
(F:3) 

The ongoing debate over how to interpret the 
Constitution is examined through scholarly writ- 
ings and decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. 
Activism versus restraint, originalism versus the 
living Constitution, tradition, moral consensus 
and precedent as sources/limits of constitutional 
principle are considered. Some background in 
constitutional law desirable. 

David R. Man-waring 



PO 461 Seminar: Power and Personality (S: 3) 

This seminar examines both the significance of 
personality in seeking, obtaining, exercising, and 
losing power and the significance of seeking, ob- 
taining, exercising, and losing power for person- 
ality. Class discussion will focus first on certain 
analytical, including psychoanalytical, hypotheses 
about the relationship between power and person- 
ality, then, on applying and testing these hypoth- 
eses in psychobiographies of particular powerful 
persons, such as Woodrow Wilson, Winston 
Churchill, and Adolf Hitler, and finally on student 
research projects. Marvin Rintala 

PO 465 Seminar: Modern Mexican Politics 

(S:3) 

This seminar focuses on 20th century politics in 
Mexico. The first section deals with the social and 
political transformations brought about through 
the Mexican Revolution; the second deals with the 
creation and consolidation of the post-revolution- 
ary state, with an emphasis on state-society rela- 
tions; and the third section deals with contempo- 
rary challenges to one-party rule, including the 
role of opposition parties as well as a wide range 
of popular movements. Jennie Purnell 

PO 553 Seminar: U.S.-Japan Relations (S: 3) 

The focus is on how the current crisis in U.S.- 
Japan relations and how it is handled is likely to 
affect people across the globe. This course ana- 
lyzes the important factors — historical, strategic, 
economic, and political — affecting the current 
relationship and then considers how the relation- 
ship can and should be handled in the future. 

Kenji Hayao 

PO 662 Seminar: Politics and Education (S: 3) 

This course is an examination of politics and edu- 
cation. Readings include Plato, Locke, and con- 
temporary authors. Susan Shell 

PO 664 Seminar: The Mind of the Founders 

(S:3) 

This course includes selections from John Locke, 
Montesquieu and Blackstone to illuminate the 
thought underlying the American constitutional 
order. David Lowenthal 

PO 666 Seminar: Politics, Art and Literature: 
The Russian Experience (S: 3) 

Central attention in this seminar is directed to the 
role of the intellectual, especially the writer and 
artist, in Russian and Soviet history. The inter- 
action of culture and politics will be examined. 
The unfolding of the Russian political mind will 
be traced through the Muscovy, the Tsarist, and 
the Soviet periods. The major focus in the course 
will be on the emergence and transformation of 
the Russian intelligentsia as reflected in political 
thought, literature and the arts. 

Some of the individuals who will be dealt with 
are Rublov, Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, 
Gorky, Lenin, Trotsky, Zamiatin, Eisenstein, 
Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn. Donald S. Carlisle 

PO 671 Seminar: Liberalism in Politics and Lav/ 

(F:3) 

This course is a study of the development of lib- 
eral thought, with readings from Locke, 
Blackstone, and other theorists of law. 

Robert K. Faulkner 



UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OPEN TO 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

American Politics 

PO 302 American National Government (S: 3) 

This is a survey of American national government 
and politics. Among the topics treated are the 
following: the constitutional founding, Congress, 
the Presidency, the Supreme Court, politics par- 
ties and elections, civil liberties and equality. 

Robert Scigliano 

PO 303 The Modern Presidency (F: 3) 

This course is an investigation of the development 
of the Presidency in the twentieth century. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the manner in which 
the activist presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to 
Ronald Reagan have attempted to reconcile the 
role of domestic steward with that of world leader. 
Note: Not open to students who have taken 
P0 317. Marc Landy 

PO 307 Environmental Law (S: 3) 

This course is designed to introduce students to 
the intricacies and structure of legal mechanisms 
and remedies available in the important and ex- 
panding field of environmental law. Environmen- 
tal law covers virtually every area of the legal sys- 
tem — from common law litigation and constitu- 
tional claims to cutting-edge issues of complex 
government agency regulations and the creation 
and enforcement of international legal norms. 
The course is offered by two-person teams from 
the law school, under the supervision of Law 
school Professor Zygmunt Plater. 

Zygmunt Plater 
PO 308 Public Administration (S: 3) 
This course will be devoted to the examination of 
the behavior of public administrative agencies at 
all levels of government, with a focus on the fed- 
eral bureaucracy. Among the topics covered are 
the following: theories of organization and admin- 
istration; leadership; communication; budgeting; 
administrative law; personnel practices; public 
unionism. Among the questions considered are 
the following: Is there an American science of 
administration? What is the relationship between 
a country's administrative culture and its politi- 
cal culture? What is bureaucracy for, and where 
did it come from? Are the sins of bureaucracy 
inevitable, or can bureaucracy be reformed to 
make it easier to live with? Dennis Hale 

PO 31 1 Urban Politics (S: 3) 

This is a general survey of the political institu- 
tions, decision-making processes, and public poli- 
cies of urban areas. Among the topics treated are 
the economic and political development of the 
urban community, the nature of political cleav- 
age and conflict in urban areas, the institutions 
and decision-making processes of urban govern- 
ments, the public policies of the cities and an as- 
sessment of political alternatives for the govern- 
ing of urban areas. Duane Oldfield 

PO 312 Women in Politics (S: 3) 

This course probes the role of women as both 
citizens and political elites in American politics, 
and it considers the efforts that have been made 
in the past, and are being made today, on behalf 
of their collective political interests. The differ- 
ent, and often contradictory, ways that feminist 



56 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Political Science 



and New Right women define what is in the best 
interests of women will be investigated. Finally, 
the course analyzes the political controversies 
surrounding a number of public policies regulat- 
ing educational opportunity, employment dis- 
crimination, and sexual harassment. 

Kay L. Schlozman 

PO 316 Topics in American Politics: The 
President, Congress, and War Power (F: 3) 

This course is a study of the role of the President 
and Congress in foreign policy, particularly with 
respect to the use of military force. The course 
considers the intention of the Founding Fathers 
and political practice from the late eighteenth 
century to the present. Robert Scigliano 

PO 321 American Constitutional Law (F: 3) 

The evolution of the American Constitution 
through Supreme Court decisions is studied, with 
emphasis on the nature and limits of judicial 
power and the Court's special role as protector of 
individual rights. David R. Manwaring 

PO 338 The American Voter (S: 3) 

This course is a study of American electoral poli- 
tics from the New Deal coalition to the Reagan 
coalition. Included are the following: the rise of 
ideology, the decline of party and the changing 
role of class, race, region, gender and generation. 
Application of mass marketing techniques to po- 
litical campaigns is considered. 

William Schneider 

PO 349 Politics and the Media (F: 3) 

This course is an analysis of the mass media's 
impact on the workings of the American Politi- 
cal System. Explored will be such topics as the 
media's interaction with political institutions, its 
role in campaigning, its use by office holders and 
politicians, and its effect upon recent events in the 
political arena, e.g., its treatment of terrorism, 
violence, riots, etc. Marie Natoli 

Comparative Politics 

PO 405 Politics in Western Europe I (F: 3) 

This course introduces a comparison of national- 
level politics in Western Europe by comparing 
politics in Britain and France (including the 
Third, Fourth, and Fifth Republics). Special at- 
tention will be given to the most important so- 
cial forces, such as nationalism, religion, and so- 
cial class, working through the most important 
political institutions, such as elections, parties, and 
parliamentary government. Marvin Rintala 

PO 406 Politics in Western Europe II (S: 3) 

This course introduces comparison of national- 
level politics in Western Europe by comparing 
politics in Germany (including the Imperial, 
Weimar, National Socialist, and present German 
political systems), Sweden, and Switzerland. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the most important 
social forces, such as nationalism, religion, and 
social class, working through the most important 
political institutions, such as elections, parties, and 
parliamentary government. Marvin Rintala 

PO 409 Soviet Politics: From Lenin to Yeltsin 
(F:3) 

This course analyzes the Soviet political system 
from its 1917 origin through its 1991 collapse. 
Leninism and Stalinism will be analyzed. The 
Khrushchev and Brezhnev periods will be 



examined. Gorbachev's and Yeltsin's roles in the 
demise of the USSR will be studied in detail. Fi- 
nally, post Soviet politics and the Yeltsin years will 
be explored. Donald S. Carlisle 

PO 417 Government and Politics of Japan 
(F:3) 

This course offers an overview of contemporary 
Japanese politics, designed for students with a 
general interest in Japan, as well as, for political 
science concentrators. It begins with a brief his- 
torical account, and proceeds to discussions of 
Japanese culture and society, electoral politics, 
decision-making structures and processes, and 
public policy issues in both domestic and foreign 
affairs. Kenji Hayao 

PO 423 From Empires to Nations (S: 3) 

This course includes analyses of the emergence, 
maintenance and decline of the major imperial 
systems. The bureaucratic empires of antiquity, 
including the Chinese and Roman enterprises, 
will be treated. The modern continental empires 
such as the Austro-Hungarian and Russian will be 
discussed. Also examined will be the British and 
French overseas imperial experiences. Finally, 
contemporary problems, including Soviet and 
American issues and the emergent nation-states 
of the so-called Third World, will be discussed. 

Donald Carlisle 

PO 428 Politics in Latin America (F: 3) 

This course examines Latin American politics in 
a comparative and historical context, using 
Mexico, Brazil, Chile, and Cuba as case studies. 
The course will focus on political institutions and 
actors, including the state, political parties, the 
military, and social groups, as well as on the dy- 
namics of political change, including elections, 
military coups, revolutions, and social move- 
ments. Jennie Purnell 

PO 435 Politics and the Movies: Heroes and 
Heroism (S: 3) 

This course examines the portrayal of heroes, 
heroines, and heroism in the movies. The class 
will view films that depict model characters and 
perennial problems that are political in nature or 
closely related to politics. Historically based films, 
including the so-called Epics, will be analyzed in 
terms of these themes as well as for their treat- 
ment of ethical dilemmas and recurring philo- 
sophical questions. Required readings will supple- 
ment the movies in order to provide perspective 
on the context, events, and individuals presented 
in the films. Donald S. Carlisle 

PO 437 Political Change in the Third World 

(F:3) 

This course examines the dynamics of political 
change in the developing countries of Africa, 
Latin America, and the Middle East. The first 
section is an overview of state-society relations; 
the second section focuses on Third World ex- 
periences with democracy, dictatorship, and revo- 
lution; the third section examines the impact of 
gender, ethnicity and religion on political conflict; 
and the fourth section focuses on policy issues, 
including famine, population, the environment, 
and urbanization. Jennie Purnell 



PO 438 (HS 272) Introduction to Russian, 
Soviet, and East European Studies (F: 3) 

This course provides the student with the key 
themes, theories and approaches necessary for 
further detailed study of Russia, the former 
USSR, and the East European states. The major 
findings and methods used by specialists in vari- 
ous disciplines will be previewed and presented. 
Not open to those who have taken PO 080. 

Donald S. Carlisle 
Raymond T. McNally 

PO 439 Leadership in Europe (F: 3) 

This course centers on the questions: What is 
leadership? What kinds of leadership are there? 
These questions will be answered both analyti- 
cally and empirically. The data will come partly 
from studies of political elites in modernizing and 
modern Europe and partly from the careers of 
some European leaders, including: Lloyd George, 
Churchill, and Thatcher in Britain; Blum, 
Mendes-France, de Gaulle, and Mitterrand in 
France; Bismarck, Hitler, Adenauer, and Brandt 
in Germany. Marvin Rintala 

PO 442 The Political Institutions of Western 
Europe (S: 3) 

This course studies the most powerful institutions 
in the political process of democratic political 
systems in Western Europe, beginning with that 
institution that is closest to the people, elections 
and moving through parties, legislatures, and ex- 
ecutives to that institution that is furthest from the 
people, the state. Marvin Rintala 

International Politics 

PO 501 International Politics (F: 3) 

The nation-state system, its principles of opera- 
tion and the bases of national power and policy 
are examined. This course serves as an introduc- 
tion to the study of international politics. 

Donald L. Hafner 

PO 504 International Politics of Europe (S: 3) 

This course is an analysis of the main currents of 
international relations among European nations, 
focusing particularly on the rise of Europe as a 
major international actor and the problems of 
building a new European community following 
the demise of the Soviet Union. 

Donald L. Hafner 

PO 516 American Foreign Policy (F: 3) 

This course will examine the distinctive ways in 
which the American public and policy-makers 
have understood and applied principles of inter- 
national politics during our nation's history. The 
domestic political as well as the intellectual foun- 
dations of American international behavior will be 
studied. Donald L. Hafner 

PO 520 (EC 396) (RL 300) The European 
Experience (Summer: 3) 

Summer Study Program in Louvain, Belgium. 

This interdisciplinary course is taught by Pro- 
fessors David Deese, Political Science, Jeffrey 
Howe, Fine Arts, Frank Murphy, History, Rob- 
ert Murphy, Economics, and a wide range of of- 
ficials from the European Community and pro- 
fessors from the University of Louvain. The the- 
matic focus is the European Community's single 
internal market. Students live and attend classes 
at the Irish Institute of European Affairs in 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Political Science • 57 



Louvain, which is a 20-minute train ride north- 
east of Brussels, Belgium. 

Course units include historical and cultural 
roots of the European Community; the econom- 
ics of integration; the political roots -and motiva- 
tions of the Community; the institutions and le- 
gal process; and selected art and architecture of 
Belgium and Europe. DavidA.Deese 

Political Theory 

PO 606 Foundations of Modern Political 
Philosophy (S: 3) 

An introductory consideration of a few seminal 
views. The course will glance at the post-modern- 
ist critique of modern life by Foucault and 
Heidegger and then reconsider the stages in the 
development of modern thought articulated by 
Nietzsche, Kant, and Machiavelli. 

Robert K. Faulkner 

PO 608 Introduction to Political Philosophy 
(S:3) 

Can one know what is good and what is the best 
political order? This is a careful consideration of 
a few leading inquiries, especially in shorter writ- 
ings of Plato, Machiavelli, and recent political 
thinkers. Robert K. Faulkner 



PO 627 Shakespeare's Political Wisdom I (F: 3) 

This is a study of King Lear, Hamlet and Measure 
for Measure. David Lowenthal 

PO 628 Shakespeare's Political Wisdom II 

(S:3) 

Four other Shakespearean plays are studied with 
care. This course can be taken independently of 
PO 627. David Lowenthal 

PO 645 Kant's Political Thought (F: 3) 

This is a study of the political philosophy of Kant 
and its bearing on American political thought and 
practice. Part of the course will be devoted to 
various recent attempts to re-conceive and/or 
revive American liberalism along Kantian lines. 

Susan Shell 

PO 646 Socrates on Love and Politics (F: 3) 

This is a study of Xenophon's Symposium and 
Plato's Symposium, the two great classical treat- 
ments of love and politics. Christopher Bruell 

Special Graduate Courses 

PO 799 Reading and Research (F, S: 3) 

A directed study in primary sources and authori- 
tative secondary materials for a deeper knowledge 
of some problems previously studied or of some 
area in which the candidate is deficient. 
By arrangement. The Department 



PO 801 Thesis Seminar (F, S: 3) 

A research course under the guidance of a faculty 
member for those writing a Master's Thesis. 

The Department 

PO 802 Thesis Direction (F, S: 0) 

This is a non-credit course for those who have 
received six credits for Thesis Seminar but who 
have not finished their thesis. This course must 
be registered for and the continuation fee paid 
each semester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 

PO 888 Master's Interim Study 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

PO 998 Doctoral Comprehensive 

For students who have not yet passed the Doc- 
toral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the 
status of a non-matriculating student for the one 
or two semesters used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

PO 999 Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. The Department 



Psychology 



FACULTY 

Marc A. Fried, Professor Emeritus; B.S., City 
College of New York; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Ali Banuazizi, Professor; B.S., University of 
Michigan; A.M., The New School for Social 
Research; Ph.D., Yale University 

Randolph Easton, Professor; B.S., University of 
Washington; A.M., Ph.D., University of New 
Hampshire 

Marianne LaFrance, Professor; A.B., University 
of Windsor; A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

G. Ramsay Liem, Professor; A.B., Haverford 
College; Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Michael Numan, Professor; B.S., Brooklyn 
College; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

William Ryan, Professor; A.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University 

Ellen Winner, Professor; A.B., Radcliffe College; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Daniel J. Baer, Associate Professor; A.B., LaSalle 
College; A.M., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Norman H. Berkowitz, Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst; A.M., 
Ph.D., Boston University 

Hiram H. Brownell, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Stanford University; M.A., Ph. D.Johns Hopkins 
University 



Donnah Canavan, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Emmanuel College; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Peter Gray, Associate Professor; A.B., Columbia 
University; Ph.D., Rockefeller University 

Michael Moore, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Gilda A. Morelli, Associate Professor; B.SC, 
University of Massachusetts, Boston; Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Karen Rosen, Associate Professor; B.A., Brandeis 
University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

M.Jeanne ShoU, Associate Professor; Chairperson 
of the Department; B.S., Bucknell University; 
M.S., Idaho State University; A.M., Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University 

Joseph J. Tecce, Associate Professor; A.B., Bowdoin 
College; M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of 
America 

John Mitchell, Assistant Professor; B.A, M.A., 
Queens University, Canada; Ph.D., Concordia 
University, Canada 

Nadim Rouhana, Assistant Professor; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Haifa; M.A., University of Western 
Australia; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Kavitha Srinivas, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Bangalore University; M.S., Purdue University; 
Ph.D., Rice University 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Ph.D. Program at Boston College 
offers training in five areas: Biopsych- 
ology, Cognition and Perception, Cul- 
tural Psychology, Developmental Psy- 
chology, and Social Psychology. The 
program provides an intellectual environ- 
ment that allows students to pursue their 
educational and research objectives work- 
ing in close association with members of 
the faculty. In part, this is accomplished by 
maintaining a very low ratio of students to 
faculty. The number of students admitted 
each year is kept small enough to yield a 
student to faculty ratio of about 1 to 1 . 

The program adapts an ecological per- 
spective to the study of psychology. Stu- 
dents are admitted whose interests fall 
within or bridge one or more of the five 
main concentrations of the Program. In 
addition, students must have demon- 
strated adequate preparation, ability, ma- 
turity, and motivation to pursue a de- 
manding program of individual research 
and scholarship. The Program accepts 
both students who wish to pursue aca- 
demic careers and those who seek employ- 
ment in nonacademic settings. Recent 
graduates are working in academic set- 
tings, human services, industry, and gov- 
ernmental agencies. 



58 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Psychology 



Ecological Perspective 

While the faculty and students in the Program are 
involved in a wide range of individual research 
pursuits, they share a commitment to an "ecologi- 
cal perspective," which cuts across the various 
research specialties. WTiat this means is that the 
members of the Program place more than the 
usual emphasis on the real-life contexts of the is- 
sues and processes that they study. This ecologi- 
cal perspective counters the frequent tendency for 
research to be responsive simply to the literature 
itself rather than to fundamental questions and 
needs. In planning and carrying out research on 
any psychological process, no matter how nar- 
rowly or broadly defined, the ecological perspec- 
tive encourages the researcher to be continuously 
concerned with the contexts in which the process 
normally operates. It is a tenet of the ecological 
perspective that even the most basic research in 
psychology profits from a continuing awareness 
of the real-life contexts in which behavior and 
experience take place, and conversely, even the 
most applied research profits from a continuing 
awareness of basic research findings and theory. 
One concrete manifestation of the Program's 
ecological perspective is the incorporation of field 
placements in a student's program of study. In 
such placements, students make use of real-world 
environments to learn about aspects of behavior 
relevant to their research interests. In addition to 
the role that field placements play in basic re- 
search, experience has shown that such place- 
ments can provide a special advantage for those 
students who seek to secure employment in 
nonacademic settings upon completion of the 
Program. 

Five Concentrations 

The research specialties of the faculty and stu- 
dents in the Program fall into five broad concen- 
trations. Some faculty and students have interests 
that span concentrations. The division into the 
five concentrations provides a formal basis for 
groups of students and faculty working on related 
problems to meet frequently to help educate one 
another. 

Concentration in Biopsychology. Faculty 
and students in the Biopsychology Concentration 
study the neural basis of behavior. One aspect of 
this research involves defining neural circuits 
underlying behavior in terms of their connectiv- 
ity, neurochemical makeup, and functional role. 
Complementary interests deal with the effects of 
experience and endocrine factors on the neural 
substrates of behavior. Areas of study include neu- 
ral and endocrine regulation of parental behav- 
ior in rodents; neural and endocrine regulation of 
sexual behavior in rodents; brain dopamine sys- 
tems and behavioral activation; and the interac- 
tions between stress, adrenal hormones, hip- 
pocampal function, and memory. A wide range of 
techniques is used to analyze these problems, in- 
cluding: immunocytochemistry; neural tract-trac- 
ing; electrophysiology; computerized image 
analysis of brain systems; electrochemical detec- 
tion of neurotransmitter release in the brains of 
behaving animals; in vitro study of primary cul- 
tures of dispersed neurons. 

Concentration in Cognition and Percep- 
tion. Faculty and students in the Cognition and 



Perception Concentration are studying mental 
processes and structures, their breakdown, and 
their application to a variety of common human 
settings and problems. Areas of study include spa- 
tial representation; relations among the percep- 
tual systems; sensory substitution in the visually 
handicapped; imagery; memory; classification; 
attentional changes in aging and as a result of 
Alzheimer's disease as measured by EEG, EOG, 
heart rate, and muscle potentials; psychophysiol- 
ogy of stress; and the breakdown of language and 
communication skills and inferential abilities un- 
der conditions of brain damage. 

Concentration in Cultural Psychology. 
Faculty and students in the Cultural Concentra- 
tion are studying the sociocultural foundations of 
mental processes and behavior, at both the indi- 
vidual and group levels. Areas of study include 
cross-cultural studies of parenting and child de- 
velopment; cultural construction of the self and 
emotions; conceptions of mental illness and health 
in different cultures; the impact of war on chil- 
dren; human rights as a mental health issue; so- 
cial-psychological dynamics of social change and 
conflict; and ethnic identity and political culture. 
These topics are pursued cross-culturally or as 
they apply to subcultures within the United 
States. Given the emphasis on the relationship 
between the individual and the sociocultural con- 
text, interdisciplinary research, involving such 
fields as anthropology, sociology, and history, is 
highly valued. 

Concentration in Developmental Psychol- 
ogy. Faculty and students in the Developmental 
Concentration are studying social, emotional, and 
cognitive development, and developmental pro- 
cesses as they are affected by the familial and so- 
ciocultural context. Areas of study include attach- 
ment in normal and atypical populations; the 
emergence of self-knowledge and self-esteem; the 
role of the culture in skill development; the in- 
fluence of care giving on sibling and peer relation- 
ships; the role of play in the development of in- 
terests and cognitive abilities; individual learning 
styles in a variety of educational settings; the de- 
velopment of artistic abilities in normal and gifted 
populations; and the acquisition of a theory of 
mind and the relationship between theory of mind 
and communication skills. Children from both 
western and non-western communities are stud- 
ied. 

Concentration in Social Psychology. Fac- 
ulty and students in the Social Concentration are 
exploring social psychological processes at several 
levels, ranging from the individual and interper- 
sonal to the group, intergroup, and organizational 
levels. Areas of investigation include the study of 
how nonverbal behavior and discourse processes 
reflect and affect social encounters; what condi- 
tions foster interpersonal conflict and its resolu- 
tion; how the exercise of power in its various 
forms influences social relationships; how people 
negotiate equity in intimate relationships; the 
processes by which social cognitions come to be 
shared; how social categories, such as gender and 
ethnicity, frame and constrain social behavior; and 
what factors affect changes in self-schemas and 
self-esteem. Research strategies encompass the 
gamut of experimental and field methodologies. 



Program Structure 

The Ph.D. Program has a flexible and mainly 
tutorial structure. Because of the Program's em- 
phasis on tutorial relations to the faculty, a prin- 
cipal criterion for admission is that a student's 
interests be compatible with those of at least one 
member of the faculty. Each student is admitted 
to work with a faculty member as his/her advisor. 
After initial consultation with the advisor, two 
other faculty members are added to form the 
student's advisory committee. The committee 
designs a specific program of studies, including 
course work within and outside the Psychology 
Department, research apprenticeships, fieldwork, 
and, most important, independent research. 
While the content of each student's work is dif- 
ferent, there are certain elements common to the 
work of all students in the Program, as described 
in the following paragraphs. 

Courses and research workshops. It is nor- 
mally expected that students take the following 
three courses during their first year in the Pro- 
gram: (1) a two-semester research methods and 
statistics course dealing with both experimental 
and non-experimental methodology and data 
analysis; (2) a two-semester Proseminar in Psy- 
chological Theory, with an emphasis on the eco- 
logical perspective; and (3) a seminar in the 
student's area of concentration. Students may take 
any number of other courses, selected by the stu- 
dent, with his or her advisory committee, to be 
consistent with the student's research and profes- 
sional objectives. Students' educational needs will 
carry them across traditional disciplinary bound- 
aries, so that taking courses in other departments 
in the University is quite common. 

Each year, students participate in a research 
workshop, consisting of a small number of faculty 
and students who have shared or overlapping re- 
search interests. These workshops are coordi- 
nated by the faculty and advanced graduate stu- 
dents in the Program, and they are intended to 
provide a continuing source of support, collabo- 
ration, intellectual stimulation, and criticism for 
the students and faculty involved. Students are 
also expected to take part, with the faculty, in 
department-wide educational activities such as 
colloquia and general research discussion meet- 
ings. Grading of work in the Proseminar and the 
Research Workshops is on a Pass/Fail basis. 

Fieldwork. Students are encouraged to con- 
front the processes that they are studying as they 
occur in settings other than the Boston College 
Psychology Department. Toward this end, stu- 
dents typically spend some time in settings that 
would provide them with an alternative view of 
die processes that they are studying. Depending 
on a student's particular needs and prior experi- 
ence, fieldwork can involve work in other labo- 
ratories, or participant-observation in an organi- 
zation or institution (e.g., school, hospital, court, 
government agency, organization for the percep- 
tually handicapped, or a special applied research 
apprenticeship), or a formal internship in a hu- 
man services agency. The faculty will help find 
field placements appropriate to each student's 
needs and wishes. 

Independent research and dissertation. 
The sine qua non for achieving the Ph.D. degree 
is the proven ability to design and conduct 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Psyci iology • 59 



independent scholarly research and to communi- 
cate and defend that research in a clear and con- 
cise manner. It is the dissertation research that 
provides the culmination of graduate education. 
Students are expected not only to acquire the very 
specific skills and knowledge needed to carry out 
their dissertation research, but also to acquire the 
broader knowledge needed to embed their re- 
search in an appropriate scholarly context. Stu- 
dents should have some idea of the kind of re- 
search they wish to conduct when they first ap- 
ply to the Program. During their first year they 
become actively engaged in research within their 
general field of interest. After demonstrating re- 
search competency by the end of their second 
year, students then move on to develop a disser- 
tation proposal. The final stage of this process, 
expected to occur in the fourth year, is an oral 
defense of the dissertation before the Depart- 
ment. 

Assessment of academic progress. For the 
first two years, evaluation focuses on the student's 
progress in demonstrating competency in re- 
search and in three substantive areas. During the 
first year, students must demonstrate competency 
in one of five general areas: Biopsychology, Cog- 
nition and Perception, Cultural Psychology, De- 
velopmental Psychology, or Social Psychology. 
Competency in the general area is demonstrated 
at the end of the first year by a written exam. Stu- 
dents prepare for the exam by reading from the 
list of readings in their area of concentration, and 
typically, by taking a seminar in their area. 

Before the end of the first year, the student 
and advisory committee define a focus area cen- 
tering on the student's research interests and an 
area adjacent, but related to the student's focal 
interest, which falls outside the general area stud- 
ied in the first year. The student and committee 
design a program of study for the demonstration 
of competency in the focus and adjacent areas to 
be completed the second year. This proposal will 
include the form(s) of evaluation and a time frame 
for completion. In the second year, the student is 
also expected to demonstrate competency 
in all phases of the research process — from 
conceptualization and design through implemen- 
tation, analysis, and written presentation. 

At the end of the first year, the student's 
progress is evaluated on the basis of the general 
competency exam, papers, presentations, course 
work, research activities, and research assistant- 
ships, as well as other scholarly work done the first 
year. In each succeeding year, the student's 
progress toward completion of the Program is 
similarly reviewed. At the end of the second year, 
when the student has completed work in each 
competency area, a more thorough evaluation 
takes place and a decision is made as to whether 
or not to accept that student into formal doctoral 
candidacy. All evaluations are conducted by the 
Graduate Evaluation Committee working in con- 
junction with the student's advisory committee. 

Kind of Student Sought. As indicated ear- 
lier, the Department seeks students whose inter- 
ests are compatible with those of one or more 
faculty members. Thus, the program is ideally 
suited for students who have already developed 
research interests in a particular area of psychol- 
ogy. The emphasis on real-world application and 



fieldwork, along with basic research and theory, 
makes the Program appropriate for students who 
seek eventual employment in either academic or 
nonacademic settings. While most candidates will 
have majored in psychology as undergraduates, 
students who have majored in other fields are also 
invited to apply. The Program actively seeks out 
applications from minority students. 

Financial Support 

Students admitted to the Program are eligible for 
an annual stipend plus credit for full tuition re- 
mission for four years of graduate study. The sti- 
pend normally takes the form of a research assis- 
tantship the first year, a teaching assistantship the 
second, and a teaching fellowship during the third 
and fourth years. These research and teaching 
activities are usually selected to be consistent with 
a student's own educational objectives. Students 
receiving this financial support are expected to 
devote full time to their graduate work. 

Application to the Program 

To apply for the Ph.D. Program you should sub- 
mit the following items in addition to the general 
application to the Admissions Office, Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences, Boston College, 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02 167. 

• Application form Al, with application fee. 

• Application Form 2. 

• Abstract of courses. 

• Official college transcripts. 

• At least two letters of reference from people who 
are knowledgeable about your potential for re- 
search and scholarship. These should be sent di- 
rectly by those who write them. 

• Scores from the Graduate Record Examinations 
and the Miller Analogy Tests. 

• A short (two to three pages, maximum) state- 
ment of your interests as they relate to the Ph.D. 
Program. This statement should include your 
reasons for undertaking graduate education, and 
give some indication of the psychological pro- 
cesses or issues that you are most interested in 
studying. 

Note: Applications are accepted for fall-term 
admission, only. The deadline for application is 
February 1 . 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Doctoral Program 

PS 606 Experimental Design and Statistics 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in statistics 
This course focuses primarily on the design 
of research experiments and the inferential statis- 
tics used to assess their results. Analysis of vari- 
ance techniques will be emphasized which assess 
the main and interactive effects of multiple inde- 
pendent variables on single dependent variables. 

Randolph D, Easton 

PS 61 5 Advanced Seminar: Social and 
Emotional (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Developmental Psychology 

In this seminar, we will explore qualitative 
changes that occur in social and emotional func- 
tioning from birth through adolescence. We will 
examine normative trends and individual differ- 
ences in the development of attachment relation- 
ships, peer relations, self-control, aggression, sex- 



typed behaviors, empathy and prosocial behavior 
and morality. Contemporary issues such as the 
effects of day care, dual-career couples, divorce 
and single parenthood will be discussed. We will 
consider the social context within which children 
live and grow and explore the role of mothers, 
fathers, siblings, peers and schools in the devel- 
opmental process. Karen Rosen 

PS 621 History and Theories of Psychology 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Survey of the philosophical roots and devel- 
opment of psychological thought from the Gre- 
cian and Medieval periods to the present. It in- 
cludes the emergence of science in the post- Re- 
naissance period and the contributions of 
Descartes, Locke, British Empiricists and 
Associationists to the evolution of psychological 
theory. Review of major developments in nine- 
teenth century physiology, Darwin's evolutionary 
theory and its consequences for psychology, and 
the emergence of psychology as an independent 
discipline in Germany and the United States. The 
rise and demise of the major systematic positions 
in psychology — Structuralism, Functionalism, 
Gestalt, Behaviorism and Psychoanalysis. An 
overview of current theoretical developments and 
controversies in psychology. Ali Banuazizi 

PS 645 Cultural Context of Child Development 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: Developmental Psychology 

The course examines the developing child 
from a cultural perspective. Topics related to the 
role sociocultural features play in arranging the 
daily lives of children, and how children appro- 
priate the skills and competencies needed to be 
functioning members of their community will be 
examined. The perspective guiding the selection 
of reading materials is that knowledge emerges by 
active participation in day-to-day routines of the 
community. Topics for discussion include 
parenting and parental beliefs, gender-role, sib- 
ling and peer relationships, psycholinguistics, 
everyday cognition, and education and the trans- 
mission of knowledge. PS 145 is strongly recom- 
mended. Gilda A. Morelli 

PS 656 Social Psychology of Conflict (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Graduate students: None 
Undergraduates: Consent of instructor 

Social psychological theories of the origins, 
development, intensification, and resolution of 
conflict at the personal, interpersonal, and 
intergroup levels will be examined. Concepts of 
social identity, life space, group membership po- 
tency, group boundaries, attribution, and cogni- 
tive schema will be employed extensively in these 
analyses. Potential effects of conflict at one level 
on the manifestation of conflict at other levels will 
be explored. Applications to current interper- 
sonal, organizational, and societal conflicts will be 
encouraged. The course will employ both lectures 
by the instructor and student presentations to the 
class on selected topics. Norman Berkowitz 



60 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • IREPM 



PS 662 Health Psychology (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Graduate Students: None 
Undergraduate students: PS 062 Psychobiology 
of Mental Disorder or permission of the 
instructor 

The role of psychological and biological fac- 
tors in the cause, treatment, and prevention of 
biomedical disorders is discussed in the context 
of clinical and basic research. A relaxation method 
is practiced in class. Seminar format. 

Joseph J. Tecce 

PS 676 Self, Ethnic Identity, and Asian 
American History (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This course is designed to explore Asian 
American history from the perspective of identity 
formation among Asian Americans. Asian tradi- 
tions and culture along with the historical expe- 
riences of Asians in America will be examined in 
conjunction with the psychological literatures on 
self and ethnic identity. As a second historical 
source, students will conduct oral histories with 
family members, ideally intergenerationally. Par- 
ticipants will also have an opportunity to learn first 
hand about contemporary issues facing Asian 
American communities in the Boston area. The 
course will be conducted in a seminar format in 
which students play an active role in facilitating 
discussion. In addition to a term paper, students 
will be invited to design a class project reflecting 
their collective understanding of self, ethnicity, 
and history. Enrollment will be limited to 15. 

Ramsay Liem 

PS 685 Advanced Topics: Aspects of Inequality 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

An intensive seminar for graduate and ad- 
vanced undergraduate students. Consideration of 
(1 ) the concept of equality and (2) specific issues 
to be chosen from such topics as the underclass 
debate, housing and homelessness, and health 
care, with particular emphasis on research by so- 
cial scientists is included. William Ryan 
PS 703-704 Research Workshops (F: 3-S: 3) 
Workshops are designed primarily to permit an 
exchange of research and theoretical interests of 



faculty and students. All participants share in the 
presentation and discussion of their work. In ad- 
dition, recent developments in the literature of 
mutual interests will be reviewed and evaluated. 

The Department 

PS 707-708-709 Fieldworlc Seminar (F: 3-S: 3; 
Summer: 3) 

In this course, students work in human service, 
educational or business settings to gain exposure 
to the issues and problems faced by practitioners 
within the student's area of research interest. Ar- 
rangements for fieldwork are made between the 
student and his or her major advisor. 

The Department 

PS 770-77 '1 Proseminar: Psychological 
Theories and Systems (F: 3-S: 3) 

This is a core proseminar for the graduate pro- 
gram that reviews the basic conceptual, proposi- 
tional, and empirical foundations of classic and 
contemporary psychological theories, with em- 
phasis on an ecological perspective. 

Peter Gray 

PS 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F: 0-S: 0) 

For students who have not yet passed the Doc- 
toral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the 
status of a non-matriculating student for the one 
or two semesters used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

PS 999 Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. 

Summer Human Interaction Institutes 

PS 824 Resolving Conflict: Interpersonal and 
Intergroup 

This workshop offers theory and practice in deal- 
ing with the conflicts that arise in social interac- 
tion between individuals or groups. Topics in- 
clude the processes leading to constructive ver- 
sus destructive conflicts, the role of attributions 
in generating relational conflicts, methods for 
preventing or de-escalating interpersonal and 



intergroup conflict, including third-party inter- 
ventions. This experience-based workshop com- 
bines lectures and exercises in a design that en- 
ables participants to make individualized applica- 
tions in areas of interest to them. 

Workshop conducted on two weekends, May 
20-22 and June 3-5. For further information, 
contact the Boston College Summer Session, 100 
McGuinn Hall. Norman Berkowitz 

PS 825 The Social Self: Group Influences on 
Personal Identity 

The subject of this workshop is how membership 
in the distinctive societal groupings — defined by 
ethnicity, race, sex, age, religion, social class and 
ideology — affects the way individuals perceive 
themselves and deal with others. The workshop 
looks at intergroup relations and the psychology 
of the social self to aid in understanding personal 
identities in a heterogeneous society. Participants 
examine their own life histories, socio-identities, 
and social relationships in a guided process of self 
inquiry. Workshop conducted on two weekends, 
June 10-12 and June 24-26. For further informa- 
tion, contact the Boston College Summer Session, 
100 McGuinn Hall. Donnah Canavan 

The following courses are offered by the Depart- 
ment on an occasional basis: 
PS 608 Multivariate Statistics 
PS 637 Child Development 

PS 639 Seminar in Developmental 

Psychopathology 
PS 648 Cognitive Neuropsychology 
PS 677 Psychology and Social Change 
PS 680 Advanced Topics in Developmental 

Psychology 
PS 68 1 Advanced Topics in Cultural 

Psychology 
PS 682 Advanced Topics in Social 

Psychology 
PS 684 Advanced Topics in Cognition and 

Perception 
PS 758 Social Inequality and Social Policy 



Institute of Religious 
Education and Pastoral Ministry 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 

Claire E. Lowery, Director; Adjunct Associate 
Professor of Pastoral Ministry and Field Education 
Program Coordinator 

Maureen R. O'Brien, Assistant Director for 
Academic Affairs 

Sandra A. Hurley, Assistant Director for 
Ad?ninistratioii 

Carol A. Regan, S.U.S.C., Sabbatical Program 
Coordinator 

Thomas H. Groome, Professor of Theology and 
Religious Education 



Elizabeth H. Galbraith, r.c., Lecturer, 
Spirituality 

Maryanne Confoy, R.S.C., Adjunct Associate 
Professor of Religious Education 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Institute of Religious Education and Pasto- 
ral Ministry at Boston College is one of the larg- 
est graduate facilities in North America dedicated 
primarily to educating women and men for aca- 
demic and professional competence in religious 



education and pastoral ministry. The Institute 
offers the combined resources of the Theology 
Department, the Graduate School of Education, 
and its own core Religious Education and Pasto- 
ral Ministry faculty, plus the opportunity to cross- 
register for courses in any of the nine different 
theological schools in the Boston area that form 
the Boston Theological Institute. The programs 
of the Institute are designed for the integration 
of theological reflection, personal experience, and 
practical ministerial skills. The Institute offers a 
Master of Education in Religious Education 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • IREPM • 61 



(M.Ed.), a Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry 
(M.A.), a Certificate of Advanced Educational 
Specialization (C.A.E.S.), and a Doctorate in 
Religion and Education (Ph.D.) 

Master of Education in Religious 
Education (M.Ed.) 

Candidates for the Master's degree in Religious 
Education study a core curriculum that enables 
them to integrate critically theological, biblical, 
and ethical studies with the perspectives and in- 
sights of contemporary educational theory and 
practice and with the social sciences. The core dis- 
tribution includes courses in theory, history and 
practice of religious education, systematic theol- 
ogy, biblical studies, and the psychology and so- 
ciology of religion. 

For students who enter the program with little 
or no prior experience in the practice of religious 
education, but even for experienced students who 
want to extend and diversify their practical skills 
in the field, Field Education and Supervised 
Practicums are available in a broad range of par- 
ishes, public and parochial high schools and el- 
ementary schools. 

The M.Ed, in Religious Education normally 
requires 36 credit hours of course work for aca- 
demic year students and 30 credit hours for sum- 
mer students. Written and oral comprehensive 
examinations are required. Students with defi- 
ciencies in their academic backgrounds may be 
required to complete course work in excess of 
these minimum requirements. 

Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry 

(M.A.) 

Candidates for the M.A. in Pastoral Ministry fol- 
low a core curriculum that includes the following: 
courses in systematic theology, biblical studies, re- 
ligious education as well as courses related to the 
student's particular ministerial concentration. 
These concentrations are as follows: 

• Pastoral Care and Counseling 

• Social Justice/Social Ministry 

• Liturgy and Worship 

• Religious Education 

• Leadership/Church Management 

• Spirituality and Ministry 

• Hispanic Ministry 

• Joint M.A./M.S.W. in Social Work 

The last three programs are described in more de- 
tail below. 

A special aspect of the M.A. program is a re- 
quired Field Education program that combines 
field placement and a Supervised Practicum dur- 
ing the academic year or one six-week summer 
session. In addition, the Integrative Colloquium 
is required for all M.A. students. 

For the M.A. in Pastoral Ministry, 36 to 39 
credit hours are ordinarily required for academic 
year students and 30 credit hours for summer stu- 
dents. Written and oral comprehensive examina- 
tions are required. Students with deficiencies in 
their academic backgrounds may be required to 
complete course work in excess of these minimum 
requirements. 

Spirituality and Ministry Concentration 

The Spirituality and Ministry concentration 
within the Master's Program in Pastoral Minis- 
try combines the following elements: theological 
and biblical studies; courses in the foundations; 



history and contemporary study of spirituality; 
field education placement in one of the spiritual 
life centers in the Boston area; a weekly practicum 
in contemporary spirituality and spiritual direc- 
tion with the staff of the Center for Religious 
Development in Cambridge, Massachusetts; and 
the integrative colloquium required of all M.A. 
students. 

The purpose of the concentration is to help 
pastoral ministers become more familiar with the 
dynamics of spiritual growth and more skillful in 
the ministry of spiritual enablement within their 
respective parishes, schools, or communities. 

This program has a limited enrollment, and 
priority will be given to those who apply by March 
1 for the following September. 

Hispanic Ministry Concentration: A Joint 
Program with the Mexican American 
Cultural Center (MACC) 

This program is conducted jointly with the Mexi- 
can American Cultural Center in San Antonio, 
Texas. It is designed to provide the theological, 
cultural, and ministerial preparation most relevant 
for both Hispanic and non- Hispanic persons en- 
gaged in ministry to the Spanish-speaking com- 
munity in the United States. Half the course work, 
including the ministerial practicum, takes place at 
the Mexican American Cultural Center in San 
Antonio. The other half of the course work is 
done at Boston College either during the aca- 
demic year or during the summer. 

This program requires bilingual competency 
or the willingness to achieve basic competency in 
Spanish while studying for the degree. 

Joint Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry 
(M.A.) and Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) 

This program enables students to study concur- 
rently for the M.A. degree in Pastoral Ministry 
and the M.S.W. in Social Work. The combined 
curriculum integrates the academic study of the- 
ology and social work with two supervised Field 
Education placements. Students enrolled full time 
may expect to receive the two degrees in approxi- 
mately three years (length of time may vary if stu- 
dents take summer courses in Pastoral Ministry). 
Prospective students must apply to both the 
Institute and the Graduate School of Social Work. 
Please see the description of this program under 
the Social Work section in this Catalog. 

Certificate of Advanced Educational 
Specialization (C.A.E.S.) 

Students who hold a Master's degree in theology, 
divinity, religious education or a closely related 
field, and who have at least three years of profes- 
sional experience in ministry, may apply for a 
program leading to the Certificate of Advanced 
Educational Specialization (C.A.E.S.). 

The program enables persons with particular 
goals to pursue their specialized interests. It is also 
valuable for those who wish to broaden their re- 
ligious, educational, and theological background. 

Programs are tailored to meet individual 
needs. Minimum core requirements are deter- 
mined on a case-by-case basis after evaluation of 
the student's academic background. Religious 
education courses are required. C.A.E.S. students 
prepare a project on a subject of specialized min- 
isterial or educational concern. The project serves 
as the basis for the written and oral examinations 



that are required of all students. Credit require- 
ments for the C.A.E.S. are the same as those or- 
dinarily required for the M.Ed., i.e., 36 credit 
hours for academic year students and 30 credit 
hours for summer school students only. 

Sabbatical Renewal in Ministry Program 

This is a program designed for the mature church 
minister who needs to "come away for a while." 
Participants renew themselves academically, spiri- 
tually and physically by auditing courses that meet 
their own interests and needs. In addition, they 
participate in a variety of activities that are di- 
rected toward the renewal of the whole person. 
These include workshops on topics of interest to 
the experienced minister, such as a bi-weekly 
colloquium and transition in ministry workshops; 
opportunities for spiritual direction and counsel- 
ing; and cultural, historical, and artistic opportu- 
nities provided in the greater Boston area. 

The Boston College sabbatical program is 
unique in that it offers the resources of the entire 
University to the participant. These include the 
Recreation Complex, courses outside the theo- 
logical disciplines, and University lectures, con- 
certs, and plays. 

Participants may enroll in the program for one 
or two semesters. The sabbatical program has lim- 
ited enrollment. Preference is given to those who 
can attend from September to May. Applications 
are accepted on an ongoing basis. International 
applicants should apply at least 3 months prior to 
their expected entrance date so that additional im- 
migration forms can be processed. 

Interdisciplinary Doctorate in Religion 
and Education (Ph.D.) 

The Institute coordinates the program of Doc- 
toral Studies in Religion and Education offered 
by the Theology Department and the Graduate 
School of Education. Students with appropriate 
Master's degrees (e.g., in theology, religious stud- 
ies, or religious education) are usually required to 
complete 50 hours of course work. In addition, 
doctoral students are expected to fulfill the for- 
eign language requirement, pass comprehensive 
examinations, and submit and defend a disserta- 
tion. 

A separate prospectus for this program is avail- 
able from the Institute. Enrolhnent is highly selec- 
tive, and the application deadline for September study 
is February 1 5. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

TH 430 (ED 439) The Psychology of Religious 
Development (F: 3) 

This course is a survey of major psychological 
perspectives on the foundation and development 
of religious consciousness and identity over the 
life cycle. The course will emphasize the student's 
personal integration of theological and psycho- 
logical visions of development and will allow the 
student to concentrate attention on the periods 
of development that are of greatest pastoral or 
personal significance (e.g., adolescence, young 
adulthood, mid-life, etc.). Margaret Gorman 

TH 532 Art of Pastoral Counseling (S: 3) 

This course will examine the prophetic nature of 
the pastoral counseling relationship. Attention 
will be given to the pastoral counselor as mediator 



62 • Gradi \ ii Ak is wo Sciences • IREPM 



between the wotld of human experience and the 
theological tradition. Topics will include the 
major issues and questions operative in the prac- 
tice of pastoral counseling. Practicum sessions 
including the use of video, role play, and taping 
will focus on dynamics, techniques, and models 
of pastoral counseling. Claire E. Lawery 

TH 535 Foundations for Contemporary 
Spirituality (F: 3) 

This course will consider spirituality as awareness 
of and response to God's continuing self-revela- 
tion. The emphasis will be on experience, not 
concepts. Contemporary religious experience will 
be explored in light of the Christian spiritual tra- 
dition. Topics will include the integration of a 
contemplative attitude with life activity, the de- 
veloping relationship with God, the growth of 
Christian freedom, and spiritual life amid conflict- 
ing values. The course will include reading, re- 
actions to presentations, and individual and group 
reflection. William Connolly, S.J. 

TH 600 Leadership and the Practice of Ministry 

(S:3) 

Leadership is a critical issue in the understand- 
ing and practice of ministry today. This course 
will examine the meaning of leadership and its 
relationship to church and society by drawing on 
existing theories and life experience. Classes will 
focus on the following topics: communication as 
a vital part of the leadership process; the impact 
of behavior and situational variables on effective 
leadership; the role of the leader; personality 
needs and job demands as major factors in pro- 
moting effective leader behavior; exploration of 
appropriate leadership styles in parish and other 
church related ministries today; and the dynam- 
ics of planning, decision making, and implement- 
ing change. Ann F. Morgan 

TH 601 Creative Life Study (F, S: 3) 

Life Study will use Intensive Journal procedures 
to put us in intimate contact with the life, wisdom, 
and spirituality of creative people in history. We 
become Journal Trustees, i.e., keep a journal on 
their behalf. This vital contact with their inner life 
can evoke our own life-wisdom and broaden our 
spiritual path. Previous attendance at Journal 
workshops is recommended. 

Elizabeth H. Galbraith, r.c. 

TH 605 Theology and Pastoral Practice: 
Integrative Colloquium (F: 3) 

The fine art of doing theology is dependent upon 
a habit of vision. It is connected to one's ability 
to bring together in both action and word the ex- 
perience of contemplation, empathy, and reason. 

This integrative colloquium in pastoral min- 
istry will provide a learning experience designed 
to strengthen the minister's ability to draw upon 
the language of faith in the practice of ministry. 
Participants will be challenged to bring to reflec- 
tion and dialogue issues addressing the contem- 
porary practice of ministry with the collective 
wisdom of the Christian tradition. 

This course is required of all pastoral minis- 
try degree students. Claire E. Lowery 

TH 61 7 Intensive Journal Method and the 
Spiritual Life (F, S: 3) 

The Intensive Journal course consists of two 
weekend workshops, readings in Progoff and bi- 



weekly meetings with the instructor. It introduces 
the student to Progoffs Intensive Journal 
Method, its procedures and principles. Students 
will learn to work non-judgmentally with their life 
defining issues, clarifying commitments, and ex- 
ploring relationships. The goal is to focus, clarify 
and integrate life experiences. 

Elizabeth H. Galbraith, r.c. 

TH 638 Advanced Intensive Journal Method 
and the Spiritual Life (F, S: 3) 

The Advanced Journal course deepens students' 
understanding of the Journal method, and their 
own life processes and principles. In doing so, 
students come to appreciate the holistic principles 
operative in their life and God's activity therein. 
The course includes advanced work with dreams 
and imagery and treats special questions such as 
discernment, integration, and transformation as 
they arise. Elizabeth H. Galbraith, r.c. 

TH 640 Pastoral Care: Death and Dying (S: 3) 

This course will serve as a thorough introduction 
to the basic theological-pastoral dimensions of 
pastoral care with those experiencing grief and 
loss resulting from death and the processes of 
dying. Special attention will be given to the role 
of the ecclesial community, as well as other sup- 
portive communities, such as hospice, in render- 
ing support. The role of faith and the place of 
ritual will be examined from an ecumenical per- 
spective. It is desirable that students take this 
course in conjunction with ministerial field edu- 
cation in a setting associated with these pastoral 
concerns and issues. John J. Grimes 

TH 644 Foundations of Theology (F: 3) 

A graduate level introduction to theology, this 
course will map the historical epochs of Christian 
theology, introduce basic theological terms and 
concepts, and examine the sources that enter into 
the formulation of theological positions. The 
course will also consider areas of theological study 
central to Christian identity including the 
following: the revelation of the Triune God, Jesus 
Christ, the Church and the world. The course will 
be sensitive to the relation among theology, spiri- 
tuality, and pastoral ministry. 

Colleen M. Griffith 

TH 707 Psychological Foundations for Pastoral 
Counseling (F: 3) 

This course will provide students with the oppor- 
tunity to consider several contemporary models 
of personality and human development that will 
assist them in the practice of pastoral counseling. 
Case studies and concrete situations will illustrate 
such models as object relations and humanistic 
and psychodynamic theories. Themes will include 
normality and integration, personality growth and 
sexuality, play and the irrational, and the links 
between psychological and theological experi- 
ences. Michael St. Clair 

TH 708 Ministry to the Troubled Personality 

(S:3) 

This course will assist the minister in handling 
common and current forms of human distur- 
bance. Using case studies and the insights of 
contemporary models of the person, we will con- 
sider depression, neurosis, narcissism, eating dis- 
orders, the borderline personality, and problems 
in relationships. Practical application of theoreti- 



cal knowledge to counseling and pastoral situa- 
tions will also be examined. Michael St. Clair 

TH 739 Christology (F: 3) 

At the heart of the Gospel narrative is the ques- 
tion: Who do you say I am? The issue of the iden- 
tity of Jesus is foundational to the identity and 
mission of the Christian and the minister. The 
course will explore this foundational issue in dia- 
logue with the Church's Christological tradition 
and contemporary questions and concerns. Its 
theological and pastoral focus will be upon the 
structure and scope of transformation in Christ. 

Paul Ritt 

TH 757 Conversion, Faithfulness and the 
Search for Transcendence: Educational and 
Ministerial Perspectives (S: 3) 

This course proposes an integrated approach to 
adult development through an examination of 
maturational theory as propounded by Fowler, 
Kegan, Selman and other developmentalists. It 
addresses the issue of conversion and the search 
for the Transcendence in personal and commu- 
nal faith contexts. Changing images of God, ap- 
proaches to prayer, worldview and understanding 
of authority are considered. Educational and min- 
isterial implications for contemporary faith com- 
munities will be explored. 

Maryanne Confoy, R.S.C. 

TH 764 Ministry/ Personality and Culture (F: 3) 

A theology of ministry and psychology of self as 
minister are useful resources of Church leader- 
ship. These topics will be explored from the per- 
spectives of Catholic faith tradition, family sys- 
tems theory, and changing American culture. 

John Grimes 

TH 816 (ED 539) Sharing Faith in Religious 
Education and Ministry (F: 3) 

The course proposes the foundations for a par- 
ticipatory and empowering approach to religious 
education and pastoral ministry. Through shared 
reflection on praxis and on course readings, par- 
ticipants are invited to adopt and to make deci- 
sions about their own approach to the ministry of 
sharing faith. Thomas H. Groome 

TH 800 (ED 538) Religious Education for a 
Public Church (S: 3) 

This course proceeds from the premise that 
churches in a pluralistic society must attend to the 
formation of their members for public involve- 
ment and the fostering of the common good with 
other citizens. Incorporating insights from soci- 
ology of religion and ethics, we will examine re- 
ligious education approaches that help to shape 
faith communities imbued with Christian social 
commitment. Maureen R. O'Brien 

TH 830 (ED 731) The Praxis of Religious 
Education (S: 3) 

This lab course invites participants to develop 
their own praxis approach to religious education 
and, with lesser focus, to other forms of 
pastoral ministry. Students must engage in some 
pedagogical/ministerial context as the praxis of 
their own in-course reflections. A shared praxis 
approach will be proposed as an organizing 
model, and it is strongly recommended that stu- 
dents have some in-depth exposure to this ap- 
proach (e.g., TH 816/ED 539) before taking this 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Romance Languages and Literatures • 63 



course. Other models of teaching that enhance a 
praxis approach will also be investigated. 

Thomas H. Groome 

TH 901 (ED 735) Educating in Faith (F: 3) 

This course is designed to involve participants in 
creating a framework for analysis of modern theo- 
logical and educational movements in order to 
engage more perceptively in the practice of reli- 
gious education. Maryanne Confoy, R.S.C. 

Courses Offered at the Mexican American 
Cultural Center in San Antonio, Texas for 
the Hispanic Ministry Program 

TH 602 Field Education and Supervised 
Practicum in Hispanic Pastoral Ministry (S: 6) 

This program provides the student with super- 
vised experience in Hispanic Ministry. Place- 
ments provide an opportunity for a high degree 
of creativity and responsible innovation. Through 
supervision in the field, discussion with other 
participants, reading and reflection, students be- 
come familiar with the needs of the Hispanic com- 
munity. Students also participate in a supervised 
practicum each week designed as an exploration 
of the theological and ministerial insights drawn 
from the field experience. 

Faculty Practicum Committee: Santiago 
Ramirez and AMCC Faculty 

TH 786 Directed Research in Hispanic Theology 
and Ministry (F: 6) 

Students in the Hispanic Ministry concentration 
develop research projects in areas of Hispanic 
theology and cultural studies. These projects are 
integrated with the MACC Hispanic Pastoral 
Ministry immersion program and are supervised 
by MACC faculty. 

Field Education, Directed Research, 
Doctoral Seminar 

TH 530 Field Education and Supervised 
Practicum in Pastoral Ministry (S: 3) 

This program provides the students with super- 
vised experience in their areas of ministerial spe- 
cialization. These areas include social ministry, 
pastoral care and counseling, spirituality, church 



administration, liturgy and religious education. 
Through supervision in the field, discussion with 
other participants, reading and theological reflec- 
tion, students become familiar with the needs of 
special groups of people and develop models of 
ministry that are applicable to their own situa- 
tions. 

In addition to their field experience, students 
participate in a supervised practicum during the 
spring semester. The practicum is a group explo- 
ration of the theological and ministerial concerns 
drawn from the field experience. Process analysis 
will be used to critique performance and develop 
personal skills and individual styles of ministry. 

Field Education is a three-credit program over 
one academic year. While students begin Field 
Education in the fall term, they do not register 
for these three credits until the spring term. 

Claire E. Lowery 

TH 538 Directed Research in Pastoral Ministry 
(F, S: 3) 

Directed research courses are opportunities for 
students to pursue special scholarly and pastoral 
interests for graduate credit, with the aid of a fac- 
ulty advisor. Only persons studying for a degree 
may take directed research. Ordinarily only one 
such project may be undertaken in the course of 
the master's program. Subject matter and require- 
ments must be worked out with the professor and 
approved by the Institute's Assistant Director for 
Academic Affairs. Claire E. Lowery 

ED 830 Directed Research in Religious 
Education (F, S: 3) 

Directed research courses are an opportunity for 
students to pursue special scholarly and pastoral 
interests for graduate credit, with the aid of a fac- 
ulty advisor. Only persons studying for a degree 
may take directed research. Ordinarily only one 
such project may be undertaken in the course of 
the master's program. Subject matter and require- 
ments must be worked out with the professor and 
approved by the Institute's Assistant Director for 
Academic Affairs. Maureen R. O'Brien 



ED 936 Doctoral Seminar in Religious Education 
(F, S: 3) 

This seminar provides an occasion for IREPM 
doctoral students to study classic works in die field 
of religious education and to prepare proposals for 
their dissertations. It meets fourteen times each 
academic year. Three credits are received for each 
of the two years of participation in the seminar. 
Second-year doctoral students lead portions of the 
seminar. Thomas H. Groome 

Weekend Course Series 

Weekend courses are fully accredited and satisfy 
Institute degree requirements. Each of these 
courses meets on Fridays from 4:00 p.m. to 
9:00 p.m. and Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. to 
4:00 p.m. on three separate weekends. 

TH 704 Parish: Community, Mission, and 
Ministry (S: 3) 

For most people, the parish is still the single most 
important part of the Church. Yet what it means 
for a parish to be a community and how it achieves 
this is open to diversity and debate The mission 
of a parish for its members and in the world un- 
dergoes constant evolution; and the balance be- 
tween clergy and lay ministry, professional min- 
istry and parishioner responsibility, in determin- 
ing who are the ministers of a parish, is undergo- 
ing a virtual revolution. The course is analytic in 
nature, bringing together theological and socio- 
logical perspectives on such topics as small com- 
munities, lay pastoral administrators, models of 
parish, the significance of stewardship, and the 
tension between inclusivity and commitment. 

The course will meet on January 27 and 28, 
February 24 and 25, and March 24 and 25. 

Philip J. Murnion 

TH 774 Women and Ministry (F: 3) 

From the earliest times in the life of the Church, 
women were integrally involved in its mission and 
ministry. Each succeeding age provided different 
opportunities and challenges for living out their 
Baptismal commitment. This course will focus on 
that history, on present day issues concerning 
women in ministry and on the theological foun- 
dations for that ministry. 

The course will meet on September 30 and 
October 1 , October 2 1 and 22, November 1 8 and 
1 9. Regina Coll 



Romance Languages 
and Literatures 



FACULTY 

Joseph Figurito, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Boston 
College; A.M., D.M.L., Middlebury College 

Joseph D. Gauthier, S.J., Professor Emeritus; 
B.S., Trinity College; A.M., Boston College; 
S.T.L., Weston College; D.esL., Laval University 

Guillermo L. Guitarte, Professor Emeritus; 
Profesorado, Filosofia y Letras, Buenos Aires 

Vera Lee, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Russell Sage 
College; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., Boston 
University 



Robert L. Sheehan, Associate Professor Emeritis; 
B.S. Boston College; A.M., Ph.D., Boston 
University 

Marie L. Simonelli, Prof essor Emeritus; Dotre in 
Letteree Filosofia, University of Florence; Libera 
Docenza in Filologia Romanza, Rome 

Matilda T. Bruckner, Professor; Chairperson of 
the Department; A.B.,BrynMawr College; M.P., 
Ph.D., Yale University 



Dwayne E. Carpenter, Professor; B.A., M.A., 
Pacific Union College; Ph.D., University of 
California at Berkeley; Ph.D., Graduate 
Theological Union at Berkeley 

J. Enrique Ojeda, Professor; Licenciado, 
Universidad Catolica Del Ecuador; A.M., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Rebecca M. Valette, Professor; A.B., Mount 
Holyoke College; Ph.D., University of Colorado 



64 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Romance Language and Literatures 



Norman Araujo, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jeff Flagg, Adjunct Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Massachusetts; M.A., Brown 
University; Ph.D., Boston University 

Rena A. Lamparska, Associate Professor; LLM, 
University ofWroelav; M.A., Catholic University 
of America; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Kevin Newmark, Associate Professor; B.A., Holy 
Cross; M.A., Middlebury College, France; Ph.D., 
Yale University 

Betty Rahv, Associate Professor; A.B., Sweet Briar 
College; A.M., Middlebury College; Ph.D., 
Indiana University 

Elizabeth Rhodes, Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Richmond; M.A., Ph. D.,BrynMawr 
College 

Harry LAR.osser, Associate Professor;B.A., College 
of VVooster; M.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Laurie Shepard, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Stephen C. Bold, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Lniversity of California at Berkley; M.A., Ph.D. 
(cand.), New York University 

Irene Mizrahi, Assistant Professor; B.Sc, 
Technian-Israel Institute of Technology; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Ourida Mostefai, Assistant Professor; Licence de 
Lettres, Universite de la Sorbonne, Nouvelle, 
Paris; M.A., Ph.D. (cand.), New York University 

Mary Ellen Kiddle, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Middlebury 
College; M.A., University of California at Berkley; 
Ph.D., Brown University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

M.A., M.A.T., and Ph.D. Programs 

The Department includes the fields of French, 
Italian, and Spanish (Peninsular and Spanish 
American) literatures. It offers Master's level pro- 
grams in all areas, with a concentration in one 
Romance literature and/or culture. These pro- 
grams are specially designed to develop and 
strengthen teachers at the secondary school level 
or to prepare teacher/scholars who may continue 
on to the Ph.D. In the Ph.D. program, students 
specialize "vertically" in French or Spanish litera- 
ture or "horizontally" in a period or genre that 
crosses three Romance literatures. The Ph.D. in 
Medieval Studies is unique in the Boston area and 
one of the special strengths of Boston College. 

Prerequisites for Admission 

Students applying for admission to graduate de- 
gree programs in the Romance literatures must 
satisfy the following prerequisites: 
• They must have achieved a general coverage of 
their major literature at the undergraduate level. 
A formal survey course or a sufficient number of 
courses more limited in scope, passed widi distinc- 
tion, satisfies that requirement. 



• At least four semesters of period or general 
courses in the major literature must be included 
in the student's undergraduate record or as gradu- 
ate work completed at other institutions. 

The deadline for applications to the Gradu- 
ate School of Arts and Sciences is July 1 for Sep- 
tember admissions and the deadline for financial 
aid requests is March 1 . The Department strongly 
recommends that students apply by April 1 for 
September admission and by February 1 for mon- 
etary support. 

Note: For complete information concerning 
the graduate programs, please consult the Gradu- 
ate Handbook of the Department of Romance 
Languages and Literatures. 

Master of Arts Degree in French, Italian or 
Spanish Literature and Culture 

This Master's program is designed to prepare 
scholars and teachers who may wish to continue 
their work toward the Ph.D. The program en- 
ables students to acquire a broad understanding 
of the literature and culture of their area of spe- 
cialization (French, Italian, Peninsular Spanish or 
Spanish American). 

Candidates for the M.A. in Literature and 
Culture earn a minimum of thirty credits in a wide 
range of courses in one Romance language. A 
reading knowledge of a second language must be 
demonstrated. At the discretion of the student's 
advisor, any foreign language that is neither the 
major nor the student's native language may be 
offered in fulfillment of this requirement. 

All candidates are expected to demonstrate 
oral proficiency at the Intermediate High level of 
the ACTFL Scale in an interview with a desig- 
nated faculty member. This requirement must be 
met before students are admitted to the oral com- 
prehensive examination. 

The Romance Languages and Literatures 
M.A. examination will consist of a two-hour writ- 
ten examination composed of two parts — a tex- 
tual analysis and an essay question — followed by 
a one-hour oral examination based upon reading 
lists and courses. Satisfactory completion of the 
written examination is a requirement for proceed- 
ing to the oral examination. 

Written and oral examinations, which are 
scheduled in October or April, are conducted in 
the target language. 

Master of Arts Degree in Language and 
Culture 

This program is specifically designed to train cur- 
rent or prospective teachers at the secondary 
school level who wish to work with greater em- 
phasis on their major field of undergraduate spe- 
cialization or strengthen their command of a sec- 
ond Romance language, its literature and culture. 
With appropriate course work, this program can 
lead to teacher certification. Candidates in other 
fields, such as International Business or Public 
Health, will also find this program valuable, given 
its cultural and linguistic orientation. 

Of the thirty (30) credits taken in the Depart- 
ment of Romance Languages and Literatures, a 
minimum of twenty-four (24) should focus on a 
single language: French, Italian or Spanish. 

All candidates are expected to demonstrate 
oral proficiency at the Intermediate High level of 
the ACTFL Scale in an interview with a desig- 
nated faculty member. This requirement must be 



met before students are admitted to the oral com- 
prehensive examination. 

The Romance Languages and Literatures 
M.A. examination will consist of a two-hour writ- 
ten examination composed of two parts — a tex- 
tual analysis and an essay question — followed by 
a one-hour oral examination based upon reading 
lists and courses. Satisfactory completion of the 
written examination is a requirement for proceed- 
ing to the oral examination. The one-hour oral 
comprehensive examination covers the 
candidate's course work and two literary works 
specified in advance to be analyzed for their lit- 
erary, linguistic and cultural content. 

Written and oral examinations, which are 
scheduled in October or April, are conducted in 
the target language. 

Master of Arts Degree in Teaching 

Offered in cooperation with the School of Edu- 
cation, this program is designed to provide cer- 
tification and continued professional development 
for secondary school teachers of French, Italian 
or Spanish. 

Candidates for the MAT. in Romance Lan- 
guages and Literatures must earn 15 credits in 
their target language. Consult the Departmental 
Graduate Handbook concerning other require- 
ments. 

All candidates are expected to demonstrate 
oral proficiency at the Intermediate High level of 
the ACTFL Scale in an interview with a desig- 
nated faculty member. This requirement must be 
met before the students are admitted to the oral 
comprehensive examination. 

The one-hour oral comprehensive examina- 
tion covers the candidate's course work and five 
short literary works chosen in consultation with 
the student's advisor. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The Department of Romance Languages and 
Literatures offers doctoral students a course of 
study specially adapted to individual needs and 
designed to train effective scholars and teachers. 
Students may structure their programs according 
to one of two distinctive models: 
Plan I: Ph.D. in French or Spanish Literature and 
Culture: Students structure their programs ac- 
cording to a vertical specialization that gives broad 
coverage through the chronological development 
of one Romance language, literature, and culture 
(French or Spanish). 
Plan II: Ph.D. in Romance Literatures: 
Students structure their programs according to a 
lateral specialization that focuses on one period 
or genre in three different languages and 
literatures. 

Plan I: Ph.D. in French or Spanish Literature 
and Culture 

Broad Chronological Coverage: With the help 
of their advisors, students select courses to de- 
velop broad coverage of their major literature 
from the Middle Ages to the present. Given the 
nature of the comprehensive examinations, stu- 
dents are encouraged to take courses in all cen- 
turies. 

Specialization: In addition to developing general 
competence, students specialize in a period ac- 
cording to one of the following options: 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Romance Languages and Literatures • 65 



• French: Any two consecutive centuries. (Excep- 
tions involving non-consecutive centuries are 
possible, with the approval of the advisor and the 
Director of Graduate Studies.) 

• Spanish: Middle Ages and Renaissance, Golden 
Age, Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries and 
Spanish-American literature. 

Exceptions to these options are possible, with 
the approval of the advisor and the Director of 
Graduate Studies. 

Related Graduate Courses: With the approval 
of their advisors, students may include in their 
doctoral program up to six credits earned in re- 
lated courses, if they are relevant to their field of 
specialization. These may include graduate 
courses in other Romance or non-Romance lit- 
eratures, language pedagogy, Fine Arts, History, 
Philosophy, etc. 

Plan II: Ph.D. in Romance Literatures 

Lateral Coverage: Early in the program, the stu- 
dent should formulate a coherent program of 
studies in consultation with the advisor. Students 
select three Romance literatures and a period or 
genre that merits investigation across linguistic 
and national boundaries. The student may elect 
a non-Romance literature as the third literature 
with the approval of the advisor and the Director 
of Graduate Studies. 

Medieval Studies: Given the particular strengths 
of Boston College, concentration in Medieval 
Studies is an important option within this lateral 
model. Students may choose any three of the fol- 
lowing literatures: Medieval French, Italian, 
Spanish, Provencal, or Latin. Students are en- 
couraged, with the approval of their advisor, to 
include extra-departmental courses in their doc- 
toral program: 12 credits if they are entering with 
a B.A., 6 credits with an M.A. Boston College has 
a rich array of medieval offerings in Theology, 
Philosophy, History, Fine Arts, Literature, and 
Political Science. 

Language Competence: For admission to the 
Romance Literatures Ph.D., applicants must have 
fluent command of at least one Romance language 
and a working knowledge of a second. The stu- 
dent must initiate the study of the third language 
as soon as possible, so as to develop graduate ca- 
pabilities in all three literatures within the time 
limits set for the comprehensive examinations. 

Admission to the Ph.D. Programs 

Students with a Master's Degree: Students 
accepted for the doctoral program are granted 
transfer credit for the M.A. or its equivalent, i.e., 
30 credits. The M.A. equivalency of foreign di- 
plomas is determined, whenever necessary, 
through communication with the Bureau of Com- 
parative Education of the Division of Interna- 
tional Education, Washington, D.C. 
Students with a Bachelor's Degree: Students 
possessing the Bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, 
should achieve coverage of their major literature 
equal to that required for our M.A. in French or 
Spanish. After 30 credits, candidates will be evalu- 
ated with special attention before being allowed 
to continue on to the Ph.D. 

Degree Requirements 

• Students earn 60 credits (students entering with 
the B.A.) or 3 credits (students entering with the 
M.A.), including 3 credits in the History of the 



Language in French or Spanish, and 3 credits in 
RL 780, Colloquium on Literary Theory and 
Criticism. 

• Students must maintain an average of B or bet- 
ter in their courses. 

• If the student's M.A. program did not include a 
second language examination, then a translation 
test will be required as described for the M.A. in 
Literature and Culture. 

• A reading knowledge of Latin is required of all 
candidates and should be demonstrated early in 
the program. A reading knowledge of German is 
required only for candidates in Medieval Studies. 

• One year of residence is required, in a fall-spring 
or spring- fall sequence. Teaching fellows of the 
Department fulfill the residence requirement by 
taking two courses per semester while teaching 
two. Students not engaged in teaching and wish- 
ing to fulfill the residence requirement by taking 
three courses per semester must petition the De- 
partment. During the year of residence, the stu- 
dent must be registered at the University and he 
or she must be engaged in a program of course 
work approved by the Department. The residence 
requirement may not be satisfied by the candidate 
during the year in which he or she is engaged in 
writing his or her dissertation. Students should 
specify in writing to the Director of Graduate 
Studies which two semesters satisfy the residence 
requirement. 

• Upon completion of all course work and lan- 
guage requirements, the doctoral student must 
pass oral and written comprehensive examina- 
tions. 

• After passing the comprehensive examinations, 
the student discusses a dissertation topic with his 
or her thesis director. Using the guidelines speci- 
fied by the Graduate School, the student submits 
an official dissertation proposal to the thesis di- 
rector, who then circulates it within the Depart- 
ment for approval. The student will write the dis- 
sertation under the guidance of the thesis direc- 
tor and fro readers. Dissertation topics may in- 
clude the following: a literary study in the field 
of specialization, a study in comparative Romance 
literatures, a study in Romance philology, a schol- 
arly edition of a text with full critical apparatus, 
and so on. The dissertation should be based on 
original and independent research and demon- 
strate advanced scholarly achievement. 

• After approval by the thesis director and the two 
readers, the dissertation will be defended by the 
candidate in a one-hour oral defense open to the 
public. 

Financial Assistance 

The following forms of financial assistance are 
available to students of the Department: Teach- 
ing Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships. 

Appointments and awards are competitive. 
They are based on the candidate's background 
and experience. For those seeking Teaching Fel- 
lowships, a personal interview is advisable. Stu- 
dents who want to obtain information about the 
University's financial assistance should consult the 
Financial Ad section of this catalog. 

Those who are interested in government 
grants should contact the University Financial Aid 
Office. 



Further information on the Graduate Pro- 
gram in the Department of Romance Languages 
and Literatures can be found in the Department's 
Graduate Handbook, which may be obtained by 
writing to Boston College, Department of Ro- 
mance Languages and Literatures, Chestnut Hill, 
Massachusetts 02167. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

All advanced literature and culture courses are 
open to undergraduate and graduate students, 
with the following distinctions generally applied: 
400, 500 and 600 level courses may be taken by 
both undergraduate and graduate students; 700, 
800, and 900 level courses are primarily designed 
for graduate students, but admit especially well- 
qualified undergraduates. 

Offerings in French, 1 994-95 

RL 403 Introduction to Linguistics for Students 
of French (F: 3) 

This course will be based primarily on an in-depth 
reading of Saussure's Coursde linguisti que generate, 
a seminal text not only for the development of 
modern linguistic theory but also for twentieth 
century critical discourse, especially (but not only) 
in France. The student will acquire a basic knowl- 
edge of the central topics in modern descriptive 
linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax and 
semantics) especially as applied to the study of the 
French language. In addition we will survey im- 
portant texts of French structuralism (e.g., articles 
by Barthes, Todorov, Levi-Strauss, and Jakobson) 
to see how the idea of language's structure has 
influenced modern theories on the structure of 
discourse generally and, more specifically, theo- 
ries of literary criticism. At the end of the semes- 
ter we will consider briefly some broader ques- 
tions including: What is a grammar? (Chomsky 
versus the structuralist linguists) and what does 
language do? (as asked by Austin, Beneviste, and 
others.) Conducted in French. Stephen Bold 

RL 404 Paris: le quartier du Marais (S: 3) 

This course presents a new way to explore the 
cultural aspects of France — past and present — by 
means of an interactive documentary on a com- 
munication-based software program that allows 
students to explore the Marais either chronologi- 
cally — in its linear historical development, or 
topically — according to a single theme, such as art 
and architecture, government, politics, daily life, 
the nobility, the people, women and the family, 
etc. The videodisc component of this course will 
be accompanied by texts to be read and individual 
or team projects to be completed during the se- 
mester. Conducted in French. Betty Rahv 

RL 431 1 7th Century French Masterpieces: 
Classicism Revisited (S: 3) 

This course will offer an advanced introduction 
to 1 7th century French literature through a study 
of major works by leading writers of the period 
including Corneille, Moliere, Racine, Pascal, La 
Rochefoucauld, La Fayette, La Fontaine and 
Boileau. These authors will be studied in the con- 
text of the cultural and political history of the 
period. Conducted in French. Stephen Bold 



66 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Romance Languages and Literatures 



RL 441 Theory and Fiction in the Age of 
Enlightenment (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 307-308 or an equivalent survey 
of French literature 

This course seeks to examine the idea of 
"Lumieres" in eighteenth century France through 
the reading of the major texts of the period. We 
will analyze the concepts central to the French 
Enlightenment including the following: toler- 
ance, progress, nature, and culture, as they are 
formulated both in the fiction (tales and novels) 
and in the major theoretical texts of Montesquieu, 
Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, and the Encyclope- 
dists. Conducted in French. Ourida Mostefai 

RL 447 Voltaire: A European in the Age of 
Enlightenment (F: 3) 

On the occasion of the tercentennial of Voltaire's 
birth this course will reflect on his extraordinar- 
ily rich and diverse career. Author of an enormous 
public and private correspondence, celebrated 
playwright, satirist, pamphleteer and writer of 
tales and other philosophical works, Voltaire ex- 
emplifies a certain notion of the role of the writer 
as a public figure. His production will be exam- 
ined in the context of his position of exile from 
France and his role in the shaping of the idea of 
Enlightenment in the European Republic of Let- 
ters. Conducted in French. Ourida Mostefai 

RL 452 Realism in French Literature (S: 3) 

A study of Realism in French poetry, drama, and 
narrative literature of the nineteenth century, with 
detailed analysis of the masterpieces. The poetry 
read will be anthological selections from the 
works of Nerval, Gautier, Leconte de Lisle, and 
Heredia. In addition, students will read Flaubert's 
Madame Bovary; Zola's Germinal; Fromentin's 
Dominique; short stories by Flaubert, Daudet, and 
Maupassan; Becque's Les Corbeaux; Rostand's 
Cyrano de Bergerac. Conducted in French. 

Norman Araujo 

RL 459 19th Century French Poetry (F: 3) 

The literary doctrine, themes, and artistic virtu- 
osity of the Romantic and Symbolist poets as they 
appear in the most significant creations of Hugo, 
Vigny, Nerval, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, and 
Mallarme. Students will read Hugo's Les Contem- 
plations; Vigny's Les Destinies; Nerval's Les 
Chimeres, Baudelaire's LesFleursdu mal; selections 
from the works of Rimbaud and Mallarme. Con- 
ducted in French. Norman Araujo 

RL 477 20th Century French Novel (F: 3) 

This is a study of exemplary French novels taken 
from the first half of the twentieth century. In- 
cluded are works by Proust, Gide, Colette, 
Bataille, Sartre, Blanchot, and Duras among oth- 
ers. Questions of meaning will be addressed by 
way of theme as well as form. Theoretical issues 
such as modernism, existentialism, and post-mod- 
ernism will also be considered in passing. Con- 
ducted in French. Kevin Newmark 

RL 479 20th Century French Poetry (S: 3) 

An examination of some of the major trends and 
authors in twentieth century French poetry. 
Readings will be taken from Valery, Apollinaire, 
Breton, Char, Ponge, Saint-John Perse, Michaus, 
Cesaire, Bonnefoy and others. Emphasis is on the 
form and interpretation of individual texts, with 
some attention to the question of the relation 



between poetry and the real, the modern, the 
political. Conducted in French. 

Kevin Newmark 

RL 480 From Autobiography to Autocriticism 

(F:3) 

Autobiography incorporates within its spelling a 
clue to contemporary concepts of autobiography 
as a literary genre: Mehlman defines Leiris's au- 
tobiographic quest as the attempt to become alive 
(bio) to oneself (auto) in what the French call the 
elusive realm of l'ecriture (graphie: writing). 

After ascertaining the givens of contemporary 
autobiographical theory, we will read one 
autobiography per week by authors such as Leiris, 
Barthes, Duras, Perec, Sartre, Sarraute, and 
Robbe-Grillet, in an attempt to discover how and 
to what extent each author succeeds in creating a 
viable, authentic and successful autobiography. 
Conducted in French. Betty T. Rahv 

RL 705 History of the French Language (S: 3) 

The seminar will trace the transformation of Late 
Latin into Old French. Texts attesting to inter- 
mediary stages of the process will be studied as an 
introduction to the earliest linguistic and literary 
monuments of ancien francais including the 
Serments de Strasbourg and the Sequence of Saint 
Eulalie. The course will focus on the phonologi- 
cal, morphological, syntactic and lexical features 
of the major Old French literary dialects. Con- 
ducted in French. Laurie Shepard 

RL 713 Provencal Poetry and the Flowering of 
Fin'Amor (F: 3) 

An introduction to the language and love of songs 
of Southern France, this course allows students 
to discover first hand a lyric tradition so rich and 
so successful that it quickly spread to all of Eu- 
rope, from Northern France to Italy and from 
Germany to Spain and Portugal. Troubadours 
and trobairitz (women troubadours) participated 
in a poetic system anchored in performance, the 
interplay of words and music, and the social set- 
ting of seigneurial courts, where poets, patrons, 
and public enjoyed the intertwined games of po- 
etry and love. Conducted in English. 

Matilda Bruckner 

RL 760 Modern French Feminisms (S: 3) 

An exploration of modern texts in French that 
treat the question of what constitutes the feminin. 
Emphasis will be placed on the relations among 
gender, writing, and alterity. Particular attention 
will be paid to discursive practices that have the 
potential to disrupt generic as well as ideological 
and institutional boundaries. Readings from 
Beauvoir, Cixous, Kristeva, Irigaray, Wittig, 
Djebar, Brossard, and Derrida. Conducted in 
French. Kevin Newmark 

Projected French Offerings, 1 995-96 

RL 400 Crisis of Conscience in Early Modern 
France (S: 3) J e ff^ a gg 

Betty Rahv 
RL 41 1 Masterpieces of Medieval French 
Literature I (F: 3) Matilda Bruckner 

RL 412 Masterpieces of Medieval French 
Literature II: Arras, a Literary Center of the 13th 
Century (S: 3) Matilda Bruckner 

RL 427 Studies in Montaigne (S: 3) 

Betty T. Rahv 
RL 432 17th Century French Novel (S: 3) 

Stephen Bold 



RL 435 17th Century French Tragedy: 'Cette 
damme noire' (F: 3) Stephen Bold 

RL 440 Images of the Family in 18th Century 
France (S: 3) Ourida Mostefai 

RL 445 Novel Writing in 18th Century France, 
or The Art of Disavowal (F: 3) Ourida Mostefai 
RL 458 "Contes et Nouvelles" in the 19th 
Century (S: 3) Norman Araujo 

RL 463 20th Century Novel course (Title TBA) 
(F: 3) Kevin Newmark 

RL 752 Mirror or Mirage in the Realistic Novel? 
(F: 3) Norman Araujo 

Offerings in Italian, 1994-95 

RL 521 Florentine Humanism (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 317-318 or equivalent, or by per- 
mission of the instructor 

The course will survey the major intellectual 
developments of the fifteenth century Florentine 
Renaissance. The optimistic and influential con- 
tributions of the Civic Humanists, Neo- 
Platonists, and the writers of the circle of Lorenzo 
the Magnificent, especially Poliziano, and finally 
the crisis of the last decade of the century and the 
powerful voice of Savonarola will be the focus of 
the discussion. Conducted in Italian. 

Laurie Shepard 

RL 522 Renaissance and Epic Theater (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL3 1 7-3 1 8 or equivalent, or by per- 
mission of the instructor 

The course will explore the language, public, 
theory and evolution of two major genres of the 
Italian Renaissance. Works by Arisoto, Tasso, 
Machiavelli and Ruzante, among others, will be 
the focus of our discussions. Conducted in Ital- 
ian. Laurie Shepard 

RL 545 Verismo and Decandentismo (S: 3) 
Prerequisite: RL 317-318 or equivalent, or by per- 
mission of the instructor 

A study of the major works of Verga, Capuana, 
Pascoli and d'Annunzio. Special attention will be 
given to changes in the concept and function of 
literature. The texts will be studied in relation to 
the social and literary milieu of the period. Con- 
ducted in Italian. Rena Lamparska 

RL 552 Monti, Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: RL 3 1 7-3 1 8 or equivalent, or by per- 
mission of the instructor 

This course is a study of the major figures of 
Italian Neoclassicism and Romanticism. Major 
themes and genres of their writings, including au- 
tobiographical fiction and memoires, the lyric, the 
novel and essay, will be examined. There will be 
a regular discussion of the connections among lit- 
erature, intellectual trends and history of the pe- 
riod. Conducted in Italian. Rena Lamparska 

Projected Italian Offerings, 1 995-96 

RL 506 Dante: La Divina Commedia (F: 3) 

Laurie Shepard 
RL 516 Boccaccio & Petrarca (S: 3) 

Laurie Shepard 
RL 565 20th Century Italian Novel (F: 3) 

Rena Lamparska 
RL 568 Theater of Pirandello (S: 3) 

Rena Lamparska 
RL 570 The "literati" and the Great War (S: 3) 

Cecilia Mattii 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Romance Languages and Literatures • 67 



Offerings in Spanish, 1994-95 

RL 656 Medieval Spanish Literature (S: 3) 

This course covers the evolution of Spanish lit- 
erature from 1 1 00- 1 500. We will examine the de- 
velopment of oral literature, the beginnings of 
Spanish as a written language in the scientific and 
didactic prose of the High Middle Ages, and the 
first attempts at an artistic use of the vernacular 
in the late Middle Ages. Medieval social, religious, 
and historical currents will be emphasized as back- 
ground for understanding the texts. Conducted 
in Spanish. The Department 

RL 663 Contemporary Spanish Novel (F: 3) 

This is a study of the Spanish Post-Civil War 
novel. The works and their evolution from Social 
Realism to New Realism are discussed in the con- 
text of political, social and cultural changes. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. Irene Mizrahi 

RL 669 Hispanic Women Writers: Through the 
Woman's "I" (S: 3) 

This discussion-based course introduces students 
to the principles of gender in language and litera- 
ture, based on which we read, in reverse chrono- 
logical order, literary works by women from Spain 
and Latin America. Searching for a common 
thread in the fabric of Hispanic texts by women, 
we will examine such issues as the subjects cho- 
sen by these authors, the representational modes 
they prefer, and the ways in which their works 
differ from those by men who were their contem- 
poraries. Conducted in Spanish. 

Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 670 Spanish American Civilization (S: 3) 

Civilization and culture are more than the aes- 
thetic expressions through the arts — whether it is 
architecture, sculpture, music, painting, theater or 
literature — of a people. They also integrate the 
customs, ideas and values of the people that de- 
termine them. The primary objective of this 
course is to explore the historical-aesthetic soli- 
darity of a vast region of the world that continues 
to seek and establish its true Latin American iden- 
tity. Conducted in Spanish. Harry Rosser 

RL 680 Jorge Luis Borges (S: 3) 

This course is an examination of Borges as a short 
story writer and includes a close reading of 
Historia universal de la infamia, Ficdones, ElAleph, 
and some of his latest narratives. The course will 
start delineating some of his major themes, such 
as reality and image, the world as a book, his con- 
ception of time, the impossible quest, etc. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. Guillermo Guitarte 

RL691 Spanish Lyric Poetry: Origins to 18th 
Century (F: 3) 

The focus of this course is lyric poetry in its 
various guises, including, but not limited to, the 
jarchas, the Libro de buen amor, 15th century 
serranillas, Renaissance love poetry, Baroque sat- 
ire, Romantic forms, and the Neoclassical redis- 
covery of traditional lyrical themes. Attention will 
be paid to historical, social, and formal aspects of 
lyric poetry, as well as to its aesthetic qualities. 
Conducted in Spanish. The Department 

RL 904 Intellectual History of Latin America 

(F:3) 

The course will present the history of ideas in 
Latin America, from independence to the present; 



texts will be studied as reflections or answers to 
the problems of each period of the history of Latin 
America including: independence, organization, 
twentieth century republican life, the present 
years. Authors studied will be Bolivar, Bello, 
Sarmiento, Marti, Hostos, Rodo, Mariategui, 
Mallea, Paz, Fernandez Retamar. Conducted in 
Spanish. Guillermo Guitarte 

RL 930 The Secret Canon of Early Modern Spain 

(F:3) 

This seminar studies the process of literary can- 
onization, that of making cultural, secular saints, 
as a power construct that protects the interests of 
the dominant class by silencing a multitude of 
diverse voices. The literary canon of sixteenth and 
seventeenth century Spain will be considered as 
a cultural construct, built at the expense of what 
people were really reading during the period; the 
interests guiding the canon's formation will be 
explored. Course is based on the M.A. and Ph.D. 
reading lists. Previous course work in Early Mod- 
ern Spanish Literature helpful; undergraduate's 
must have professor's permission. Conducted in 
Spanish. Elizabeth Rhodes 

RL 958 The Age of Galdos (S: 3) 

The course intends to familiarize the students 
with 19th century Spain in order to understand 
the historical, social and literary forces that con- 
tributed to the shaping of Galdos' world. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. J. Enrique Ojeda 

RL 964 The Limits of Imagination: 20th Century 
Spanish Meta literature (S: 3) 

This course investigates 20th century Spanish lit- 
erary works (prose, poetry and theater) that fo- 
cus on literature's discourse on its own formation 
and its own practices. The nature, purpose and 
consequences of these self-conscious literary ex- 
pressions will be examined in-depth. Conducted 
in Spanish. Irene Mizrahi 

RL 982 The Art of the Short Story: The Latin 
American Trajectory (F: 3) 

Beginning with the elements of oral tradition, 
reflected in early writings, the development of the 
genre of the short story will be traced to the 
present. Attention will be given to major literary 
currents and their effects on form and content. 
Hallmark writers featured are Echeverria, 
Quiroga, Dario, Bombal, Borges, Cortazar, Rulfo, 
Donoso, Garcia Marquez, and Allende. Emerg- 
ing contributors to the genre will also be included. 
Conducted in Spanish. Harry Rosser 

Comprehensive and Continuation Courses 

RL 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

RL 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F: 0-S: 0) 

For students who have not yet passed the Doc- 
toral comprehensive but prefer not to assume the 
status of a non-matriculating student for the one 
or two semesters used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 



RL 999 Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay for the doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. 

Projected Spanish Offerings, 1995-96 

RL 650 Social and Intellectual History of 
Medieval Spain (S: 3) Dwayne E. Carpenter 

RL 655 Andean Novel (F: 3) 

J. Enrique Ojeda 
RL 693 Introduction to 20th Century Spanish 
Literature (F: 3) Irene Mizrahi 

RL 694 Contemporary Spanish Literature in Film 
(S: 3) Irene Mizrahi 

RL 901 Stylistics Analysis (F: 3) 

Elizabeth Rhodes 
RL 905 History of the Spanish Language (F: 3) 

Dwayne E. Carpenter 
RL 929 Cervantes for Graduate Students (F: 3) 

Elizabeth Rhodes 
RL 961 Dynamics of Dissent in the Spanish 
American Novel (F: 3) Harry Rosser 

RL 962 Modernismo and Vanguardia (S: 3) 

J. Enrique Ojeda 
RL 965 Women Playwrights of Today's Spain 
(F: 3) Irene Mizrahi 

Language and Methodology Courses 
Offered in English, 1994-95 

RL 495 (ED 303) Second Language Acquisition 
(F:3) 

This course explores the complexity of how 
people learn a second language and reviews sec- 
ond-language acquisition research in the light of 
its classroom applications. Emphasis is placed on 
techniques for developing oral and written profi- 
ciency. Students will analyze available audio-vi- 
sual materials and learn how to integrate these 
materials into their instruction. This course is par- 
ticularly recommended for students who are plan- 
ning to teach French and it fulfills the Massachu- 
setts certification requirements in Secondary 
Methods. Rebecca Valette 

RL 498 Seminar in Oral Proficiency and 
Language Testing (S: 3) 

This course introduced students to the ACTFL 
Proficiency Guidelines and the Oral Proficiency 
Interview. All students will be given an informal 
Oral Proficiency rating plus individualized study 
plans for improving their proficiency. Students 
will learn the basic concepts of measurement and 
their application to foreign language testing. This 
course is particularly recommended for students 
who are planning to teach French and it fulfills 
the Massachusetts certification requirements in 
Measurement and Testing. Rebecca Valette 

RL 572 The Comparative Development of the 
Romance Languages (S: 3) 

This course focuses on the formation of the Ro- 
mance languages with special emphasis on Span- 
ish, French, and Italian. The class explores the 
historical context in which the Romance lan- 
guages developed and the linguistic features that 
are common to Spanish, French and Italian, as 
well as those that are unique to each. We will 
study early Romance texts from linguistic and 
cultural perspectives. The course is open to un- 
dergraduates and graduates. Laurie Shepard 



68 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Slavic and Eastern Languages 



Slavic and Eastern Languages 



FACULTY 

Lawrence G. Jones, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
Lafayette College; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Michael J. Connolly, Associate Professor; 
Chairperson of the Department; A.B., Boston 
College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Michael B. Kreps, Associate Professor; Diploma, 
Leningradskij gosudarstvennij universitet; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley) 

Margaret Thomas, Assistant Professor; B.A. Yale 
University; M.Ed., Boston University; A.M., 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jovina Y. H. Ting, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
A.B., Guoli Taiwan Daixue; M.A., Kent State 
University; M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., New 
York University 

DEPARTMENTAL OVERVIEW 

The Department of Slavic and Eastern Languages 
provides graduate and undergraduate level 
courses of study through its three overlapping 
component programs: 

• The Program in Linguistics 

• The Program in Slavic Studies 

• The Program in Asian Studies 

GRADUATE PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 

The Department administers three different 
Master of Arts degree programs: 
Russian Language and Literature 
Slavic Studies 
General Linguistics 

Additionally the Department participates in a 
program for the Master of Arts in Teaching 
(MAT.) with the Graduate School of Education. 

Each semester the Department offers a pro- 
gram of high-level graduate courses in St. Peters- 
burg at the prestigious Institut russkoj literatury 
(Pushkinskij dom) of the Russian Academy of Sci- 
ences. Full-time Boston College graduate tuition 
covers four courses in this program, air travel, pri- 
vate room and board in a Russian family, and a 
cultural activity program. Details on this BC/IRL 
study/research program are available from the 
Department. 

Admission 

For admission to M.A. candidacy in Russian or 
Slavic Studies, students must be able to demon- 
strate a working knowledge of the Russian lan- 
guage equivalent at the very least to the profi- 
ciency expected at the end of three years (ad- 
vanced level) of college study. They must also be 
acquainted with the major facts of Russian litera- 
ture and history. 

Students applying in General Linguistics, a pro- 
gram that stresses structural, semiotic and philo- 
logical techniques with an emphasis on the inter- 
disciplinary nature of Linguistics (i.e., not re- 
stricted to Slavic topics), should have a good 



preparation in languages, modern and ancient, 
some undergraduate-level work in Linguistics, 
and have done introductory work in the intended 
areas of concentration (e.g., psychology, speech 
therapy, mathematics). 

Slavic Studies and Linguistics programs involve 
a significant proportion of work in other de- 
partments of the University, and candidates in 
these areas are be expected to meet all prerequi- 
sites for such courses and seminars. 

Students must also be prepared, in the course 
of studies, to deal with materials in various lan- 
guages as required. A reading knowledge of 
French and German will almost always be needed, 
plus Latin and Greek for linguists. 

Students with an undergraduate degree who 
require preparation for admission to the M.A. 
may apply as special students. This mode of ap- 
plication is suited to those who are looking for 
post-undergraduate courses without enrolling in 
a formal degree program and for guests from 
other universities who are enrolling in the B.C./ 
IRL St. Petersburg program. 

Degree Requirements 

All M.A. programs require: 

• a minimum often one-semester courses (thirty 
credits) in prescribed graduate-level course work; 

• three qualifying examinations, which a student 
must have passed by the end of the first year of 
full-time study or its equivalent; 

• two special field examinations; 

• a supervised research paper of publishable qual- 
ity on an approved topic. 

The grades for the qualifying examinations, 
special-field examinations, and the research paper 
are reported to the Registrar as a single compre- 
hensive examination grade. Comprehensive ex- 
amination sectors are in written or oral format, 
depending on the nature of the subject matter. 

The Department has exemption procedures 
to allow limited substitution of requirements. A 
student may apply up to two courses (6 credits) 
of advanced work from other universities or re- 
search institutes toward program requirements, 
provided this work has not been previously ap- 
plied to an awarded degree. 

English for Foreign Students 

The Department offers a number of specialized 
courses of English language and literature for 
foreign students enrolled at Boston College 
(SL 117-120) as well as linguistics courses for 
training teachers of English to foreign students. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Graduate level courses offered annually are so 
marked; all other courses are offered as parts of 
varying course cycles, and information for any 
given year may be found in the Registrar's Sched- 
ule of Courses. 

Courses below SL 300 do not normally apply 
for graduate degree credit but are open to inter- 
ested graduate and special students. Full descrip- 
tions of such courses appear in the Undergradu- 
ate Catalog. 



SL 009-010 Elementary Chinese I/II 

SL 023-024 Elementary Japanese I/II 

SL 027-028 (EN 093-094) Introduction to 
Modern Irish I/II 

SL 031-032 Introduction to Korean I/II 

SL 033-034 Elementary Russian I/II 

SL 051-052 Intermediate Russian I/II 

SL 061-062 Intermediate Chinese I/II 

SL 063-064 Intermediate Japanese I/II 

SL 067-068 (EN 097-098) Continuing Modern 

Irish MI (F: 3-S: 3) 

SL 075-076 Continuing Korean I/II 

SL 1 1 7 (EN 1 1 7) English Grammar Review for 
Foreign Students 

SL 1 1 8 (EN 1 1 8) Introduction to Academic 
Resources (For Foreign Students) (S: 3) 

An introduction, primarily for international 
graduate students, to the resources of an Ameri- 
can university and to the skills necessary to profit 
most from higher education. The preparation of 
oral presentations; conventions of scholarly docu- 
mentation; using a research library; reading faster 
with better comprehension; understanding aca- 
demic discourse. Attention to specific language 
skills, such as vocabulary and grammar, as needed. 
Intended only for students whose native lan- 
guage is not English. Enrollment by placement 
test only. Margaret Thomas 

SL 1 19 (EN 1 19) The Craft of Writing (For 
Foreign Students) 

SL 120 (EN 120) The Study of Literature (For 
Foreign Students) 

SL 157-158 Praktika russkoj rechi I/TI 
SL 163-164 Chukyu kaiwa I/II 
SL 165-166 Zhongji kouyu I/II 
SL 205 Tolstoj and Dostoevskij (in translation) 
SL 2 16 (EN 552) Poetic Theory 
SL 221 (TH 198) The Language of Liturgy 
SL 222 Classics of Russian Literature (in 
translation) 

SL 227 Advanced Russian Grammar 
SL 230 Russian Literature of the Fantastic (in 
translation) 

SL 234 The Polish Language 
SL 240 The Contemporary Russian Novel (in 
translation) 

SL 243 Image and Icon in Russian Literature (in 
translation) 

SL 245-246 Advanced Chinese I/II 
SL 253 The Celtic Heroic Age: Word and 
Image 

SL 255 Modern Chinese Writers (in 
translation) 

SL 257-258 Advanced Japanese I/II 

SL 260 (EN 100) Advanced Readings in 

Modern Irish 

SL 261 Love and Nature in Far Eastern 

Literatures 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Slavic and Eastern Languages • 69 



SL 262 Gods and Heroes in Far Eastern 

Literatures (in translation) 

SL 263 Far Eastern Civilizations 

SL 267 Early Ireland: Lore and Language 

SL 306 Approaches to Russian Literature (F: 3) 

The application to Russian literature of literary 

criticism and theory from Aristotle's Poetics up 

through traditional criticism, including the 

Prague School, various types of structuralism, and 

deconstruction. The study of Russian literature 

in its native context receives special attention with 

readings from such theorists as Belinskij, 

Merezhovskij, Shklovskij, and Baxtin. All Russian 

literary and critical texts are read in the original. 

Offered annually Cynthia Simmons 

SL 307 Russian Drama (3) 

A close study of selected works in this genre from 
Fonvizin through Tolstoj, Chexov, Blok and 
Majakovskij to the modern theater. The structure 
of the drama and the techniques of the romantic 
and the realist will be examined. Lectures and 
readings entirely in Russian. Offered triennially 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 308 Dostoevskij and Tolstoj (3) 

A study and analysis of realism in the works of two 
of Russia's most influential writers. Readings and 
selected criticism. Conducted in Russian. Offered 
triennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 31 1 (EN 527) General Linguistics (F: 3) 

An introduction to the history and techniques of 
the scientific study of language in its structures 
and operations: articulatory and acoustic phonol- 
ogy, morphological analysis, historical recon- 
struction, and syntactic models. Offered annually 

M.J. Connolly 
SL 316 Old Church Slavonic (F: 3) 
The origins and development of the Slavic lan- 
guages; the linguistic structure of Old Church 
Slavonic and its relation to modern Slavic lan- 
guages, illustrated through readings in Old 
Church Slavonic texts. 

Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic lan- 
guage. Offered biennially M. J. Connolly 

SL 317 Old Russian (F: 3) 

An intensive study of the grammar and philology 
of Old Russian and early East Slavic; readings in 
Russian secular and religious texts from the 
Kievan period through the seventeenth century; 
Russian Church Slavonic as a liturgical language. 
Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic lan- 
guage. Offered biennially M. J. Connolly 

SL 320 Pushkin and Gogol' (3) 

Close readings of the major works of Pushkin and 
Gogol' as well as related works of Lermontov. In- 
dividual literary techniques and styles are studied 
against the background of Russian romanticism 
and the transition to Russian realism. Conducted 
in Russian. Offered triennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 321 Turgenev and his Contemporaries (3) 

The aesthetic and ideological values of 
Turgenev's works; Turgenev's role in literary 
circles of the mid- 19th century in Russia and 
abroad. Students also explore writings of the pe- 
riod (e.g., Goncharov and Ostrovskij) for their 



polemical and ideological content. Conducted in 
Russian. Offered triennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 323 (EN 121) The Linguistic Structure of 
English (F: 3) 

An analysis of the major features of contemporary 
English with some reference to earlier versions of 
the language: sound system, grammar, structure 
and meanings of words, properties of discourse. 

Recommended: Previous or simultaneous 
course work in Linguistics or in the history of the 
English language. 

This course is a prerequisite for enrollment in 
SL 360/EN 660. Offered annually 

Margaret Thomas 

SL 324 (CL 286) The History and Structure of 
Latin (S: 3) 

An introduction to the phonological, morphologi- 
cal, and syntactic structures and history of Latin 
from the earliest inscriptions through the classi- 
cal and medieval periods up to neo-Latin. 
Offered triennially M.J. Connolly 

SL 325 (EN 528) Historical Linguistics (S: 3) 

The phenomenon of language change and of lan- 
guages, dialects, and linguistic affinities, examined 
through the methods of comparative linguistics 
and internal reconstruction. Offered triennially 

M.J. Connolly 

SL 327 Sanskrit (S: 3) 

The grammar of the classical language of India, 
supplemented through reading selections from 
the classical literature and an introductory study 
of comparative Indo-Iranian linguistics. Offered 
triennially M.J. Connolly 

SL 328 Classical Armenian (S: 3) 

A grammatical analysis of Armenian grabar, the 
classical literary language current from the fifth 
century. Sample readings from Classical Arme- 
nian scriptural, patristic, liturgical, and historical 
texts are also included. Offered triennially 

M. J. Connolly 
SL 332 The Russian Short Story (3) 
The development and structure of the Russian 
rasskaz and povest' from the 16th through the 20th 
centuries. Readings in Russian. Offered triennially 

Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 333 Introduction to the West Slavic 
Languages (S: 3) 

A grammatical and phonological study of a fea- 
tured West Slavic language (Czech, Polish or Slo- 
vak), structural sketches of the other West Slavic 
languages, inductive readings in West Slavic texts. 
Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic lan- 
guage. Offered biennially Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 334 Introduction to the South Slavic 
Languages (S: 3) 

A grammatical and phonological study of a fea- 
tured South Slavic language (Serbo-Croatian, 
Bulgarian, Slovenian or Macedonian), structural 
sketches of the other South Slavic languages, in- 
ductive readings in South Slavic texts. 

Recommended: Prior study of a Slavic 
language. Offered biennially Lawrence G. Jones 
SL 339 (EN 234) Semiotics and Structure (3) 
Theoretical and practical considerations for the 
use of modern semiotic and structural techniques 
in the analysis of paralinguistic systems, literature, 



mythology and other products of social commu- 
nication. Offered biennially Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 342 Seminar in Russian Poetry (3) 

Detailed study of the style, structure and thematic 
content of works from a selected group of Rus- 
sian poets. Texts in Russian. Offered triennially 

Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 343 (EN 512) Old Irish (S: 3) 

A descriptive and historical examination of the 
linguistic features of Old Irish among the Celtic 
and Indo-European languages; the reading of 
Early Irish texts. Offered triennially 

M.J. Connolly 

SL 344 (EN 392) Syntax and Semantics (S: 3) 

An introduction to the concepts and operations 
of modern transformational-generative grammar 
and related models. Linguistic theories of mean- 
ing. Offered biennially Margaret Thomas 

M. J. Connolly 

SL 348 Chexov (3) 

A close reading in Russian of some of Chexov's 
major prose, along with a survey of the critical 
literature on his works and a brief study of the 
influence of his style on later Russian writers. 
Offered triennially Lawrence G. Jones 

SL 349 Advanced Russian Writing and 
Translation (S: 3) 

A study of the subtleties of Russian syntax, vo- 
cabulary and style through both extensive analytic 
reading and through imitative and original writ- 
ing; the theory and practice of preparing refined 
translations both from and into Russian. Con- 
ducted entirely in Russian. Offered annually 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 352 Russian Literary Humor and Satire (3) 

A survey of theories of humor with readings from 
selected Russian satirical and comic literature 
from the 18th to the 20th century. Conducted 
entirely in Russian. Offered triennially 

Michael B. Kreps 

SL 353 Romantizm v russkoj literature (3) 

A study of Romanticism in Russian poetry, drama, 
and narrative literature of the 19th century. A 
close analysis is made of the features of this liter- 
ary movement in works of Zhukovskij, Marlinskij, 
Pushkin, Lermontov and others. Romantic litera- 
ture as a genre within a larger European frame- 
work is considered. Conducted entirely in Rus- 
sian. Offered triennially Michael B. Kreps 

SL 356 Classics in Linguistics (3) 

Prerequisites: A course in General Linguistics and 
at least one additional Linguistics elective. Stu- 
dents must be prepared to follow some of the 
readings in the original languages. 

Supervised readings, reports, and discussions 
on formative and important works in the devel- 
opment of linguistic thought from the ancient 
world up through modern linguistic controver- 
sies. Readings are chosen with partial consider- 
ation of students' research interests. 

Margaret Thomas 

M.J. Connolly 

Joseph Davis 

SL 358 The Linguistic Structure of Japanese (3) 

A linguistic outline of the Japanese language for 
students with some previous exposure to Linguis- 
tics or to Japanese (but not necessarily to both). 



70 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Sociology 



The phonological and writing systems of Japanese 
and their origins; fundamentals of Japanese syn- 
tax and characteristics of Japanese vocabulary are 
included. Offered triennially Margaret Thomas 

SL 360 (EN 660) The Teaching of English as a 
Foreign Language (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: SL 323/EN 121 or equivalent 

An overview of the field of foreign language 
learning and teaching from a linguistic perspec- 
tive with an emphasis on issues involved in teach- 
ing of English to non-native speakers. An exami- 
nation of the relationship between views of the 
nature of language and different approaches to 
language teaching. Supervised experience in the 
teaching of English. Offered annually 

Margaret Thomas 
Joseph Davis 

SL 361 (PS 261) Psycholinguists (F: 3) 

An exploration, from a linguistic perspective, of 
some classic issues at the interface of language and 
mind. Topics include: the production, perception, 
and processing of speech; the organization of lan- 
guage in the human brain; the psychological re- 
ality of grammatical models; animal communica- 
tion; the acquisition of language both by children 
and by adults; the innateness hypothesis. 

Recommended: Some background in Linguis- 
tics or Psychology. Offered biennially 

Margaret Thomas 

SL 362 (SC 362) Language in Society (3) 

An introduction to the study of language in its 
social context: varieties of language associated 
with social class, ethnicity, locale, and age; bilin- 
gualism; pidgin and Creole languages; proposals 
about the relationship of language, thought, and 
culture; the structure and role of discourse in dif- 
ferent cultures. Sociolinguistic issues of contem- 
porary interest including: language and gender, 
language planning, and language and public 
policy are included. 

Original language oriented research forms an 
essential part of the course. Offered biennially 

Margaret Tho?nas 

SL 365 Readings in Chinese Literature and 
Philosophy (3) 

Selected readings in fundamental Confucian and 
Taoist texts and in the Yi-jing (Book of Changes); 
selected readings of representative major works 
of Chinese poetry, prose, fiction, and drama, in- 
cluding the Shi-jing (Book of Songs) and Chu-ci 
(Songs of the Chu); an examination of the influ- 
ence of philosophical ideas in the development of 
Chinese literature. Conducted entirely in Chi- 
nese. Offered biennially Jovina Y-H Ting 



SL 366 Business Chinese (S: 3) 

An analysis of the patterns and distinctive char- 
acteristics of business transactions and reporting 
in Chinese, along with numerous practical exer- 
cises. Business correspondence, report writing, 
the Chinese curriculum vitae and resume, ques- 
tionnaires, commercial law and regulations. Spe- 
cialized vocabularies for import-export, market- 
ing, finance, and economics. Conducted entirely 
in Chinese. Offered biennially Jovina Y-H Ting 

SL 367 (EN 127) Language and Language 
Types (3) 

Recent work in linguistics, cognitive science, and 
comparative philology in relation to questions 
raised by the varieties of natural language: how do 
human languages differ and what are the limits on 
variation? Analysis of linguistic variation at the 
phonological, morphological, syntactic, and prag- 
matic levels, as well as discussion of genetic (his- 
torical) relationships among the world's lan- 
guages. 

Recommended: SL 3 1 1 or equivalent, and at 
least one additional course in linguistics or per- 
mission of the instructor. Offered triennially 

Margaret Thomas 

Research Courses 

The following tutorials and courses of reading and 
research are intended solely for students who have 
exhausted present course offerings or are doing 
thesis work on advanced topics. The precise sub- 
ject matter and scheduling are determined by ar- 
rangement and such courses may be repeated for 
credit. 

SL 388 Senior Honors Project 
SL 390 Advanced Tutorial: Russian Language 
SL 391 Advanced Tutorial: Russian Literature 
SL 392 Advanced Tutorial: Linguistics 
SL 393 Advanced Tutorial: Chinese 
SL 394 Advanced Tutorial: Slavic Linguistics 
SL 395 Advanced Tutorial: Japanese 
SL 399 Scholar-of-the-College Project 
SL 400 AB Comprehensive (Russian) 
SL 401 AB Comprehensive (Linguistics) 
SL 402 AB Comprehensive (Slavic Studies) 
SL 791 Russian Literature: Reading and 
Research 
SL 792 Linguistics: Reading and Research 

SL 794 Slavic Linguistics: Reading and 
Research 



Other Courses 

Other courses in the Department's repertory, 
offered on a non-periodic basis, include: 
SL 007-008 Introduction to Arabic I/LI 
SL 065-066 Continuing Arabic I/II 

SL 206 (EN 206 / SC 206) Language, Society, 
and Communication 
SL 225 Russian Folklore (in translation) 
SL 226 Readings in Russian Short Prose 
SL 231 Slavic Civilizations 

SL 233 (EN 571) Applied English Grammar 
and Style 

SL 235 Chekhov's Plays and Stories (in 
translation) 

SL 236 A Survey of Polish Literature (in 
translation) 

SL 237 Sounds of Language and Music 

SL 238 The Language of Computing 

SL 244 (EN 099) The Irish Language 

SL 254 (TH 154) History of Eastern Orthodoxy 

SL 264 The Western Discovery of the East 

SL 265 The Dissonant Muse 

SL 305 History of the Russian Language 

SL 306 Russian Literary Research 

SL 312 The Indo-European Languages 

SL 3 1 3 Structural Poetics 

SL 3 14 Old Persian and Avestan 

SL 3 1 5 The Czech Language 

SL 322 The Structure of Modern Russian 

SL 3 3 5 Early Russian Literature 

SL 337 Comparative Slavic Linguistics 

SL 338 Tolstoy & Solzhenicyn 

SL 341 The Study of Russian Literature 

SL 351 Topics in Linguistic Theory 

SL 3 54 Bulgakov, Pasternak, Solzhenicyn 

SL 355 Linguistics and Computing 

SL 3 59 The Structure of Biblical Hebrew 

SL 363 Masterstvo perevoda 

SL 364 Readings in the History of Arabic 

Literature 

Information on these courses and their avail- 
ability may be received from the Department. 



Sociology 



FACULTY 

Severyn T. Bruyn, Professor; A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 
University of Illinois 

Charles K. Derber, Professor; A.B., Yale 
University, Ph.D., University of Chicago 

William A. Garrison, Professor; A.B., Antioch 
College, A.M., Ph.D., University of Michigan 



Jeanne Guillemin, Professor; A.B., Harvard 
University; A.M., Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Lynda Lytle Holmstrom, Professor; B.A., 
Stanford University; A.M., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Brandeis University 

David A. Karp, Professor; A.B., Harvard College; 
Ph.D., New York University 



Ritchie P. Lowry, Professor; A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 
University of California at Berkeley 

Stephen J. Pfohl, Professor; B.A., Catholic 
University of America; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State 
University 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Sociology • 71 



David Horton Smith, Professor; A.B., University 
of Southern California; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

John B. Williamson, Professor; B.S., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Paul S. Gray, Associate Professor; A.B., Princeton; 
A.M., Stanford University; A.M., Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Sharlene J. Hesse-Biber, Associate Professor; 
Chairperson of the Department; A.B., A.M., 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Seymour Leventman, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Washington State College, Chicago; A.M., 
Indiana University; Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota 

Michael A. M2^ec, Associate Professor; B.S., Loyola 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 

Paul G. Schervish, Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of Detroit; A.M., Northwestern 
University; M.Div., Jesuit School of Theology at 
Berkeley; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Eve Spangler, Associate Professor; A.B., Brooklyn 
College; A.M., Yale University; M.L.S., Southern 
Connecticut State College; Ph.D., University of 
Massachusetts 

Diane Vaughan, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

William A. Harris, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
UCLA; M.A., Yale University; Ph.D. Stanford 
University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Master's Program 

Admissions: Superior students, regardless of their 
undergraduate area of specialization, are encour- 
aged to apply. Applicants should submit, in addi- 
tion to the usual transcripts and letters of refer- 
ence, a statement of purpose and any other infor- 
mation that might enhance their candidacy. 
GRE's are recommended but not required. Per- 
sonal interviews, when practical, are desirable. 
Applications should be forwarded to the Gradu- 
ate School of Arts and Sciences, Admissions Of- 
fice, McGuinn, 22 1 . 

Degree Requirements: (1) Thirty credit hours, (2) 
theory proseminar (two semesters), (3) advanced 
research methods, (4) bivariate and multivariate 
statistics (two semesters), and (5) a Master's pa- 
per or thesis. 

Doctoral Program 

Admissions: The Ph.D. program prepares students 
for careers as college and university faculty and 
as researchers and decision makers in business, the 
public sector, and not-for-profit organizations. 
The primary criteria for admission are academic 
performance and promise of outstanding inde- 
pendent work. (See also Master's statement 
above.) 

Degree Require?nents: ( 1 ) Twenty- four credit hours 
above the M.A. level including one additional 
methods or statistics course; (2) one year resi- 
dency; (3) Ph.D. qualifying examination; and (4) 
dissertation and oral defense. 



Program in Social Economy and Social 
Justice (M.A. and Ph.D.) 

The SESJ program at Boston College is designed 
for students who wish to combine the pursuit of 
an academic degree with active efforts in the fields 
of social economy and/or social justice. The pro- 
gram prepares students for careers that integrate 
the worlds of scholarship and social action, 
whether inside or outside academic contexts. The 
program provides both analytic and practical re- 
search skills that will help students to understand 
and work in the areas of social economy and so- 
cial justice more effectively. 

M.B.A./Ph.D. Program (M.B.A./M.A. 
also offered) 

The Department and the Graduate School of 
Management administer this joint degree pro- 
gram, which trains social researchers, providing 
them with a systematic understanding of the busi- 
ness and workplace environment, and training 
managers in social research techniques appropri- 
ate to their needs. The program is interdiscipli- 
nary, focusing on topics such as corporate respon- 
sibility and accountability, social investment, 
workplace democracy, and industrial relations. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department has a limited number of cash 
awards in the form of assistantships and tuition 
waivers. Awards are made on the basis of academic 
performance, experience and skill, as well as De- 
partment needs. Application should be made to 
the Department Graduate Admissions Commit- 
tee. 

Other Information 

The Department publishes a brochure on its 
graduate programs, and a more detailed "Guide 
to Graduate Study" is available on request. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

SC 310 Studies in Crime and Social Justice 

(S:3) 

This course invites a critical sociological engage- 
ment with the historical construction, organiza- 
tion and control of crime, the criminal and the 
criminal law. In what ways is crime symptomatic 
of hierarchical social relations? Does crime repro- 
duce or resist sex/gendered, racialized, and eco- 
nomic inequalities? How might persons con- 
cerned with social justice best theorize and act 
toward crime? In approaching these questions, 
this course will draw upon a diverse range of femi- 
nist, Marxist, multicultural, anarchist, and 
poststructuralist critical perspectives. 

Stephen J. Pfobl 

SC 316 African Sociology through Novel (S: 3) 

The explosive situation in contemporary South 
Africa is examined as it is seen by the novelists of 
South Africa's many communities. Included are 
the works of Peter Abrahms, D.M. Zwelonke, 
Ezekiel Mphalele, Andre Brink, J.M. Coetzee, 
James McClure and Nadine Gordimer. 

Eve Spangler 

SC 340 Internship in Sociology I (F: 3) 

This internship program is designed for students 
who wish to acquire practical work experience in 
a human service, political, social research, or so- 
cial policy agency — private or governmental, 
profit or nonprofit. Students have the primary 



responsibility for locating their own placement 
setting; however, both the instructor and the B.C. 
Internship Program Office in the Career Center 
can be of help. Students need to meet with the 
instructor before registering to get the full details 
about the course and to discuss possible place- 
ments, as they must make arrangements for their 
placements prior to the start of the course. 

John B. Williamson 

SC 341 Internship in Sociology II (S: 3) 

This course can be taken as a continuation of 
SC 340 or as an independent course. 

John B. Williamson 

SC 345 Sociology of Religion (F: 3) 

This course reviews the major lines of classical and 
contemporary sociological thinking on religious 
consciousness and religious practice. The course 
will examine (1) classical statements on religion 
and consciousness by Feuerbach, Marx, 
Durkheim, Freud, and Weber; (2) contemporary 
theoretical initiatives in cultural studies, neo- 
Marxism, post-structuralism, and theology; and 
(3) current research studies on religion. This 
course will be taught at an advanced level but does 
not require previous work in sociology. Students 
in theology and religious studies are encouraged 
to participate. Paul G. Schervish 

SC 346 Economic Crisis and Social Change 
(F, S: 3) 

This course offers a new way to think about 
America, focusing on the connection between our 
deepest values as a nation and our intertwined 
economic and social problems. Our economic 
problems include growing poverty and inequal- 
ity, a shrinking job market, and the failure of many 
of our industries and corporations to compete 
globally. Our social crises include the growth of 
violence and the breakdown of family and neigh- 
borhood. Economic health is closely linked to 
social health. To reinvigorate our economy re- 
quires major changes in the way we think about 
ourselves and our society, as well as radical social 
transformation. Charles Derher 

SC 351 Power in Contemporary Society (F: 3) 

This course examines the types and uses of power 
in contemporary society, forms of power, and ma- 
jor historical changes. Also examined are the roles 
of ruling classes and elites, multinational corpo- 
rations, the military (including the CIA), and 
political decision making by national leaders. Of 
particular importance will be a consideration of 
the characteristics of modern warfare, the limits 
of its use as an aspect of foreign policy, and alter- 
natives to war. Ritchie P. Lowry 

SC 367 Organizational Misconduct and Control 

(S:3) 

This graduate/undergraduate course will focus on 
the origin and control of misconduct by organi- 
zations, non-profit as well as profit-seeking by 
subunits of government (e.g., the police), or na- 
tion states. We will apply the concepts and theo- 
ries of organizational behavior to see how miscon- 
duct and its control are related to the following: 
(1) the competitive environment in which orga- 
nizations exist, (2) the characteristics of organi- 
zations themselves (e.g., size, complexity, social- 
ization, computer systems), and (3) the regulatory 
environment. Diane Vaughan 



72 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Sociology 



SC 378 (PS 600) (SW 600) Introduction to 
Social Work (F, S: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to give students an 
overview of the field of social work. Starting with 
a discussion of the history of social work and the 
relevance of values and ethics to the practice of 
social work, the course then takes up the various 
social work methods of dealing with individuals, 
groups, and communities and their problems. 
The course also examines the current policies and 
programs, issues, and trends of the major settings 
in which social work is practiced. 

Regina O'Grady-LeShane 

SC 422 Internships in Criminology I (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Students are provided the opportunity to ap- 
ply social and behavior science course material in 
a supervised field setting consistent with their 
career goals or academic interests. Internships are 
available, following consultation with the instruc- 
tor, in court probation offices and other legal set- 
tings where practical exposure and involvement 
are provided. A minimum often hours service, a 
journal of activities and the creation of a service 
manual are required. Students are encouraged to 
plan to participate during the full academic year 
to derive maximum benefits. The Department 

SC 423 Internships in Criminology II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Optional continuation of SC 422 on a more 
intensive level. The Department 

SC 439 American Society in the Vietnam 
Decade (F: 3) 

This course is an examination of American soci- 
ety as the first new nation and first mass society. 
Tracing the cultural and institutional foundations 
and developments of modern-day America, em- 
phasis is placed on the structural roots that pro- 
duced the crises of the 1960s, the Vietnam De- 
cade. Seymour Leventman 

SC 445 Women and Utopias (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

The material covered in this course includes 
the classical works (Plato's Republic, Thomas 
More's Utopia, and others) and cases of American 
social experiments (Shakers, Hutterites, New Age 
communes) analyzed in terms of the roles assigned 
to women and their repercussions for the com- 
munity. Fictional Utopias formulated by women 
(Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland, Marge 
Piercy's Woman on the Edge of Time, are also ad- 
dressed. In addition to original texts, selections 
from Frances Barkowski's Feminist Utopias, 
Angelika Bammer's Partial Vision, Dorothy 
Bryant's The Kin ofAta, and Rosabeth Kanter's 
Community and Commitment are required reading. 

Jeanne Guillemin 

SC 448 (BK 367) Racism and Ethnic Protest 

(S:3) 

Students will study comparative ethnic protest 
movements, recent strategies of minority group 
advancement, and the relationships between rac- 
ism, sexism, and class inequality. The course also 
reviews the sociological theory and tools for ana- 
lyzing majority-minority group domination. 

Seymmr Leventman 



SC 450 Sociology of Development in Latin 
America (S: 3) 

This course compares patterns of economic and 
political transformation and the nature of middle- 
class politics in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. We 
will explore the interaction among key social ac- 
tors, the political system and the economic sphere 
within an historic perspective. Our primary focus 
will be on examining the contrasting political ex- 
periences of sectors of the middle class in these 
societies. The course is organized around four 
main themes: (1) the general theories of develop- 
ment and the general problem of the state in late 
developing and dependent societies; (2) theses of 
debate and their applicability to the Latin Ameri- 
can reality; (3) social class and politics; and (4) 
historical transformation of middle class in a com- 
parative perspective. The Department 

SC 460 Sociology of Women' Health Through 
the Lifespan (F: 3) 

Women are the most frequent users of the health 
care system and are the majority of workers in the 
health care system. In addition, many of women's 
normal life transitions and bodily functions have 
been medicalized or brought under the control of 
the health care system. For these and other rea- 
sons, a sociological understanding is crucial to the 
demystification of a woman's relationship to her 
body, her health care providers and institutions, 
and the overall health care system. 

Through examination of selected topics in 
women's health, the course will compare medi- 
cal versus the holistic views of women's health and 
women's lives. Paula Doress-Worters 

SC 468 (ED 349) Sociology of Education (S: 3) 

This course will examine the scope and usefulness 
of the sociology of education. A number of criti- 
cal problems will be examined such as the follow- 
ing: How does schooling influence socialization, 
the social organization of knowledge, and the 
structure of economic opportunity? How do 
schools as formal organizations transmit and in- 
stitutionalize social norms and habits? How do the 
dynamics of an educational organization work? 
Does education generate inequality by reproduc- 
ing social classes? Are there any relationships be- 
tween educational achievement and economic op- 
portunity? What role does schooling play in mod- 
ernization and social change in less developed so- 
cieties? The course approaches these problems 
from the diversity of theoretical approaches and 
from the diversity of applications of sociological 
knowledge to the understanding of education. 

Tedl.KYoun 

SC 491 Sociology of the Third World (S: 3) 

This course is a sociological explanation of his- 
torical and contemporary events in Asia, Africa, 
and Latin America. This course ties together 
themes of social, political, and economic devel- 
opment. Emphasis is placed on the role of emerg- 
ing institutions — political parties, bureaucracies, 
businesses, trade unions, armies, etc. — in meet- 
ing the challenges of dependency and moderniza- 
tion. Paul S. Gray 

SC 509 Feminism and Methodology (S: 3) 

This course examines a range of feminist and sci- 
entific literature that is concerned with issues of 
methodology. We address the following: (1) 



What are the basic assumptions concerning the 
scientific method in the existing social science lit- 
erature? (2) Is there a feminist methodology? (3) 
To what degree is science a cultural institution 
influenced by economic, social and political val- 
ues? (4) To what extent is science affected by sexist 
attitudes and to what extent does it reinforce 
them? We will examine several research studies 
that employ a feminist methodology and those 
that do not. SharleneJ. Hesse-Biber 

SC 527 The Evolution of Culture (F: 3) 

This course is an anthropological examination of 
symbolic life in the emergence of culture. Special 
attention will be devoted to myth, folklore, strati- 
fication and political systems. The course will 
cover the origins of society in the life of the fam- 
ily and the tribe. Attention will be given to cross- 
cultural studies of sex behavior, the development 
of music, and the principles of evolution. 

Severyn T Bruyn 

SC 532 Images and Power (S: 3) 

This course is a critical examination of contem- 
porary image making. An exploration of the so- 
cial production, meaning and uses of art in mod- 
ern and post-modern society. Particular attention 
is paid to the relationship between visual imag- 
ery and the politics of class, race and gender; art 
in the age of mechanical reproduction (i.e., pho- 
tography, film and video); sex and reproduction 
in the age of mechanical art; the avant-garde and 
anti-art, dada and the like. Stephen J. Pfohl 

SC 533 Sociology and Psychoanalysis (F: 3) 

This seminar is located at the crossroads of psy- 
choanalytic method and the sociological imagina- 
tion. A critical reading of social-psychoanalytic 
themes pertaining to the transferential character 
of social gift-exchange, the ritual construction of 
gendered subjectivity, and the role of unconscious 
symbolic drives in compulsively forming and rep- 
etitiously resisting the reproduction of economic, 
sexual and racial hierarchies. It is a consideration 
of Sigmund Freud's Interpretation of Dreams, 
Jacques Lacan's Four Fundamental Concepts of Psy- 
choanalysis, Luce Iragaray's Speculum, of the Other 
Woman, and Helen Cixous and Catherine 
Clement's The Newly Bom Woman. Included are 
texts by Marcel Mauss, Claude Levi Strauss, Franz 
Fanon, Julia Kristeva, Georges Bataille, Jane 
Gallop, Jacques Derrida, Juliet Mitchell and Louis 
Althusser. Particular attention is paid to the rela- 
tions between psychoanalysis, feminism and 
Marxist criticism. Stephen J. Pfohl 

SC 546 The Social Structure of Occupational 
Health (F: 3) 

This course will use an organized actor analysis 
to examine the role of labor, management, health 
professionals and the state in creating, recogniz- 
ing and controlling occupational disease. The 
course is open to undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents in Sociology, Management, Nursing and 
Law. Eve Spangler 

SC 550 Important Readings in Sociology (S: 3) 

This small working seminar involves intensive 
readings and classroom discussion of and about 
major sociological theorists and theories. Of par- 
ticular interest is the way in which classic socio- 
logical theory can help develop unique insights 
into such contemporary social problems as crime, 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Sociology • 73 



war and violence, poverty, and sexism and dis- 
crimination. Ritchie P. Lowry 

Paul S. Gray 

SC 564 Seminar on Medical and Family 
Sociology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This seminar will focus on student research 
projects in the area of medical and family 
sociology. Lynda Lytle Holmstrom 

SC 578 Corporate Social Responsibility (F: 3) 

Contemporary capitalism is in crisis as a result of 
the general lack of social responsiveness on the 
part of corporate executives, shareholders, inves- 
tors, and other economic stockholders. In re- 
sponse, movements have arisen in recent decades 
to respond to this crisis, including: socially re- 
sponsive investing, shareholder and consumer 
action, and corporate training in ethics. This 
seminar, through shared readings and discussions, 
will consider the ways in which these movements 
are responding to the crisis in capitalism. We will 
consider alternative and more productive forms 
of economic and business conduct. 

Ritchie P. Lowry 

SC 702 Introduction to Statistics and Data 
Analysis (F: 3) 

This course will introduce the basic statistical 
concepts used in social research: centrality and 
dispersion, correlation and association, probabil- 
ity and hypothesis testing, as well as provide an 
introduction to the B.C. computer system and the 
SPSS data analysis package. Michael A. Malec 

SC 703 Multivariate Statistics (S: 3) 

This is an applied course with a focus on the 
analysis of cross-sectional data. It assumes a 
knowledge of the material covered in SC 702. 
Thus, it assumes a solid background in SPSS as 
well as a basic course in statistics. We will focus 
on three general statistical procedures: factor 
analysis, analysis of variance, and regression analy- 
sis. However, the course is focused primarily on 
multiple regression and related procedures; in this 
context we consider data transformations, analy- 
sis of residuals and outliers, covariance analysis, 
interaction terms, quadratic regression, dummy 
variables, and stepwise regression. Also covered 
are one-way ANOVA and multiple classification 
analysis. Our focus is on data analysis, not on the 
mathematical foundations of the statistical pro- 
cedures considered. John B. Williamson 

SC 704 Topics in Multivariate Statistics (F: 3) 

This applied course is designed for students in 
sociology, nursing, education, social work, psy- 
chology, or political science with a prior back- 
ground in statistics at the level of SC 703 . It would 
assume a strong grounding in multiple regression 
and a solid working knowledge of SPSS. Among 
the procedures covered will be analysis of covari- 
ance using regression, a detailed discussion of 
interaction analysis in regression, reliability analy- 
sis, matrix algebra, log-linear analysis, logistic 
regression, recursive and non-recursive causal 
modeling (including path analysis), and discrimi- 
nate function analysis. John B. Williamson 

SC 705 Advanced Statistics (S: 3) 

This seminar focusing on time series analyses of 
longitudinal data sets is designed for students who 
have a good command of multiple regression 



procedures as covered in SC 703. The course has 
a strong emphasis on the performance of statisti- 
cal procedures through automated data process- 
ing methods. A working knowledge of SPSS is 
assumed. Other statistical software products are 
introduced, such as SAS, as part of an initial re- 
view of basic statistics and in a unit on matrix al- 
gebra. A major topic in the course is the genera- 
tion, modification and testing of structural equa- 
tion models, such as LISREL models. Readings 
from the empirical literature and the works of 
such writers as Bollen, Duncan, and Joreskog that 
guide students in the study of these models are 
included. Participants in the seminar can expect 
a hands-on, can-do, trial-and-error approach. 
The discussion of mathematical theory and the 
derivation of formulas is minimal. The method 
used to convey information concentrates on the 
appropriate use of statistical procedures, the pro- 
gramming of software to perform analyses, and 
the interpretation of printouts. 

William A. Harris 

SC 710 Advanced Research Methods (F: 3) 

This course presents the wide range of alterna- 
tive research methods available to the social re- 
searcher. Among those considered are the follow- 
ing: survey research, observational field research, 
intensive interviewing, experimental research, 
historical analysis, and content analysis. Consid- 
erable attention is given to comparisons among 
these alternative methods and to an assessment of 
the relative strengths and limitations of each. In 
the context of discussing these alternative research 
methods, attention is given to problem formula- 
tion, measurement, reliability, validity, sampling, 
and ethical considerations; such issues must be 
taken into consideration by all who engage in 
social research. A great deal of attention will be 
given to issues related to research design. 

Sharlene Hesse-Biber 

SC 71 1 The Sociological Craft (S: 3) 

The major focus of this seminar will be on the 
craft of writing. The course is premised on the 
idea that development of one's skills as a writer 
requires constant feedback and constructive criti- 
cism. We will do some reading on the process of 
writing and discuss pieces of sociological work 
that class members judge as combining analyti- 
cal power and graceful expression. The main work 
of the seminar, however, will consist of the stu- 
dents and professor sharing work-in-progress. 

William A. Gamson 

SC 715 Theory Proseminar I (F: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to examine the works 
of the leading classical theorists. Both their sub- 
stantive concerns with the character of modern 
society and their epistemological strategies for 
studying social reality will be examined. Assign- 
ments will emphasize the readings in original 
sources, with primary concentration on the works 
of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. Eve Spangler 

SC 716 Theory Proseminar II (S: 3) 

This course examines the major lines of contem- 
porary sociological theory. It reviews the main 
philosophical traditions in epistemology, the 
meaning of theory, the theoretical task of sociol- 
ogy, the functionalism of Merton and Parsons, 
structuration theory, symbolic interactionism, 



ethnomethodology, sociology of knowledge, cul- 
tural Marxism, structural Marxism, feminist 
theory, cultural studies, and post-structuralism. 

Paul G. Schervish 

SC 728 Inequalities in Health Care (S: 3) 

Inequalities in health insurance, in access to health 
care, and in medical treatment are historically 
characteristic of the United States system. This 
course considers how social class, race, gender, 
age, and disabilities have affected the health sta- 
tus and medical care available to Americans. Strat- 
egies and policies for promoting equity, includ- 
ing cross-national comparisons, will be reviewed. 

Jeanne Guille?nin 

SC 734 New Developments in Race, Class and 
Gender (F: 3) 

Recent theoretical writings on class, race, gender 
and immigration will be examined in the context 
of contemporary economic, social and political 
trends in the United States. How well do these 
writings clarify contemporary developments? 
How effectively are the stratificational influences 
interconnected? European and North American 
writers will be studied, including Bourdieu, 
Goldthorpe, Acker, Wright, Lipset, Wilson, 
Massey, P. Williams, Sen, Jensen, Rubery, L and 
C. Tilly S.M. Miller 

SC 736 Introduction to Social Economy I (F: 3) 

This course will provide an introduction to the 
field of social economy for entering students in 
the SESJ program. It is intended to introduce stu- 
dents to a broad theoretical overview of the field, 
including both macro and micro levels of analy- 
sis. Central concepts of the social economy para- 
digm, including self-governance, self-manage- 
ment, industrial democracy and social planning 
will be discussed, as well as major substantive topic 
areas including organizational democracy, worker 
control of the labor process, employee ownership, 
corporate social responsibility, industrial policy, 
social federations, social investment and national 
social planning. Charles Derber 

SC 742 The New Minorities (F: 3) 

This seminar looks at America's newest minori- 
ties as nonwhite, former colonial, non-European 
peoples. They contrast with conventional Euro- 
pean derived minorities upon which American 
sociology's models and perspectives for minority- 
majority studies were based. Challenges are posed 
for constructing new paradigms dealing with the 
changed experiences of the more recent arrivals. 

Seymour Leventman 

SC 751 Quest for Social Justice (S: 3) 

The seminar will focus on purposeful efforts by 
organized groups and social movements to bring 
about social and political change. It is geared to- 
ward problems and issues faced by such groups: 
(1) diagnosing the opportunities and constraints 
provided by the system in which they are operat- 
ing; (2) analyzing the problems of mobilizing 
potential supporters and influencing targets of 
change; and (3) dealing with the efforts of antago- 
nists to control them. The seminar will attempt 
to provide a coherent analytic framework and a 
set of concepts for understanding efforts at social 
change. On many issues, there are competing 
views and, in such cases, we will examine the 



74 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Theology 



theoretical controversies and the relative useful- 
ness of different approaches. William A. Gamson 

SC 753 Organizational Analysis (S: 3) 

The purpose of this course is to become familiar 
with, apply, and discuss basic concepts that guide 
our understanding of organizations. The skills 
learned will enable students to critically evaluate 
organization theory and research; to master ba- 
sic analytic techniques essential to research design 
and theory generation; to better diagnose prob- 
lems in organizations and create strategies for 
change. Students will choose some organization 
to study throughout the semester. The choice 
should be some organizational form that lends 
itself to analysis: some complex organization, 
group, formal organization, or network of orga- 
nizations to which the student perhaps already 
belongs or can readily gain access. Over the course 
of the semester, each student will do a case study 
of this organization. Seven key concepts will be 
used to guide these analyses. Diane Vaughan 



SC 799 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 

Independent research on a topic mutually agreed 
upon by the student and professor. Professor's 
written consent must be obtained prior to regis- 
tration. The Department 

SC 801 Thesis Seminar (F, S: 3) 

A research course under the guidance of a faculty 
member for those writing a Master's Thesis. 

The Department 
SC 802 Thesis Direction (F, S: 0) 
A non-credit course for those who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their theses. This course must be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 

SC 888 Master's Interim Study (F, S: 0) 

For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 



SC 900 Teaching Apprenticeship (F, S: 3) 

By arrangement. The Department 

SC 901 Research Apprenticeship (F, S: 3) 

By arrangement. The Department 

SC 902 Seminar in Teaching Sociology (S: 3) 

This is an examination of issues and problems in 
teaching sociology at the college level. It is 
strongly recommended for all current and pro- 
spective teaching assistants and fellows. Offered in 
95-96 

SC 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F, S: 0) 

This course is for students who have not yet 
passed the Doctoral Comprehensive but prefer 
not to assume the status of a non-matriculating 
student for the one or two semesters used for 
preparation for the comprehensive. 

SC 999 Doctoral Continuation (F, S: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register, and 
pay the fee, for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. 



Theology 



FACULTY 

Stephen F. Brown, Professor; A.B., St. 
Bonaventure University; A.M., Franciscan 
Institute; Ph.L., Ph.D., Universit de Louvain 

Michael Buckley, S. J., Professor; B.A., M.A., 
Gonzaga University; Ph.L., S.T.L., Pontifical 
University of Alma; S.T.M., University of Santa 
Clara; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Lisa Sowle Cahill, Professor; A.B., University of 
Santa Clara; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Robert Daly, S.J., Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; A.M., Catholic University; Dr. Theol., 
University of Wurzburg 

Donald J. Dietrich, Professor; Chairperson of the 
Department; B.S.,Canisius College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota 

Harvey Egan, S.J., Professor; B.S., Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute; A.M., Boston College; 
Th.M., Woodstock College; Dr. Theol., 
University of Munster (Germany) 

J. Cheryl Exum, Professor; A.B., Wake Forest 
University; A.M., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia 
University 

Ernest L. Fortin, A. A., Professor; A.B., 
Assumption College; S.T.L., University of St. 
Thomas, Rome; Licentiate, University of Paris; 
Doctorate, University of Paris 

Margaret Gorman, R.S.C.J., Adjunct Professor; 
B.A., Trinity College; M.A., Fordham 
University; Ph.D., Catholic University 

Thomas H. Groome, Professor; A.B., St. Patrick's 
College, Ireland; A.M., Fordham University; 
Ed.D., Columbia Teachers College 



David Hollenbach, S.J., Flatley Professor; B.S., 
St. Joseph's University; M.A., Ph.L., St. Louis 
University; M.Div., Woodstock College; Ph.D., 
Yale University 

Philip J. King, Professor; A.B., St. John Seminary 
College; S.T.B., St. John Seminary School of 
Theology; S.T.L., Catholic University of America; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; S.T.D., 
Pontifical Lateran University 

Matthew L. Lamb, Professor; B.A., Scholasticate 
of Holy Spirit Monastery; S.T.L., Pontifical 
Gregorian University; Dr.Theo., State University 
of Munster 

William W. Meissner, S.J., Professor; University 
Professor of Psychoanalysis; B.A. (m.c.l.), M.A., 
St. Louis University; S.T.L., Woodstock College; 
M.D. (c.l.), Harvard University 

John Paris, S.J., Walsh Professor; B.S., M.A., 
Boston College; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.L., 
Weston College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Southern California 

Pheme Perkins, Professor; A. B., St. John's College; 
A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Anthony Saldarini, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 
College; Ph.L., Weston College; A.M., Ph.D., 
Yale University 

Francis A. Sullivan, S.J., Adjunct Professor; B.A., 
M.A., Boston College (Weston College); M.A., 
Fordham University; STL, Weston College; 
STD, Pontifical Gregorian University 

Francis X. Clooney, S.J. , Associate Professor; A.B., 
Fordham University; M.Div., Weston School of 
Theology; Ph.D., University of Chicago 



Mary F. Daly, Associate Professor; A.B., College of 
St. Rose in Albany; A.M., Catholic University; 
Ph.D., St. Mary's College; S.T.L., S.T.D., Ph.D., 
University of Fribourg 

John A. Darr, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., 
Wheaton College (Illinois); A.M., Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University 

Charles C. Hefling, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Harvard College, B.D., Th.D., The Divinity 
School Harvard University; Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Michael J. Himes, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Cathedral College; M. Div., The Seminary of the 
Immaculate Conception; Ph.D. University of 
Chicago 

Robert P. Imbelli, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Fordham University; S.T.L., Gregorian 
University, Rome; M. Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Frederick Lawrence, Associate Professor; A.B., St. 
John's College; D.Th., University of Basel 

Claire Lowery, Adjunct Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of San Diego;M.Div., D.Min., Andover 
Newton Theological School 

H. John McDargh, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Emory University; Ph.D. Harvard University 

Stephen] A*ope, Associate Professor; A.B., Gonzaga 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Louis P. Roy, O.P., Associate Professor; B.Ph., 
M.A.Ph., M.A.Th., Dominican College, Ottawa; 
Ph.D., University of Cambridge 

Margaret Amy Schatkin, Associate Professor; A. B . , 
Queens College; A.M., Ph.D., Fordham 
University; Th.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Theology • 75 



Francis P. Sullivan, S J., Adjunct Associate Professor; 
A.B., A.M., S.T.L., Boston College; S.T.D., 
Institut Catholique de Paris 

Thomas E. Wangler, Associate Professor; B.S., 
LeMoyne College; M.A., Ph.D., Marquette 
University 

James M. Weiss, Associate Professor; A.B., Loyola 
University of Chicago; A.M., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago 

John Makransky, Assistant Professor; B.A., Yale 
University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Willemien Often, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Amsterdam 

Patrick J. Ryan, S.J., Assistant Professor; A.B., 
A.M., Boston College; A.M. , Assumption College; 
S.T.L., Weston College; S.T.D., Gregorian 
University 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

Boston College is one of nine member schools of 
the Boston Theological Institute, a consortium 
that includes the Boston College Theology De- 
partment, Andover Newton Theological School, 
Boston University School of Theology, Episco- 
pal Divinity School, Gordon-Conwell Theologi- 
cal Seminary, Harvard Divinity School, Holy 
Cross Greek Orthodox Seminary, St. John's 
Seminary and Weston School of Theology. All 
graduate students in any of Boston College's 
graduate Theology and Religious Education/Pas- 
toral Ministry programs enjoy the privileges of 
full cross-registration, faculty exchange programs 
and library facilities in the eight other schools. 

M.A. in Theology 

This degree serves (1) as a stepping stone or prov- 
ing ground for those who wish to move on to 
higher degree programs and academic careers, or 
(2) as an academic preparation for those moving 
towards professional, religious or ministerial ca- 
reers, or (3) as part of an enrichment or retooling 
program for those already established in such ca- 
reers. 

Students applying for admission to the M.A. 
Program in Theology should have the docu- 
mented and/or proven ability to do graduate-level 
work in Theology. Where this is found to be in- 
sufficient, supplementary work will have to be 
done by the student before formal entry into the 
30-credit phase of the program. 

Three letters of recommendation, a statement 
of purpose, a resume, GRE scores (or TOEFL for 
a foreign student), the Graduate School applica- 
tion, and a writing sample are usually required for 
admission and for consideration for financial aid. 

Candidates for the M.A. are required to com- 
plete 30 credits, either on a full-time or part-time 
basis, for the degree; one course each in Ethics, 
Bible and History is required, plus a two-semes- 
ter, six-credit survey course in Systematic The- 
ology; the remaining five courses are electives. 
Reading knowledge in an appropriate foreign lan- 
guage is tested; written and oral comprehensive 
examinations are given at the completion of the 
program. 



M.A. in Biblical Studies 

The goal of the program is to acquaint students 
with the results of research into Biblical literature, 
history, exegesis and theology, and with the meth- 
ods proper to these approaches. This program is 
designed for those who wish to lay a foundation 
for work in teaching, preaching or ministry, and 
for those anticipating further study in Bible or 
theology. Students will specialize in either Old or 
New Testament. 

Thirty-six credits will be required for the M.A. 
Students will complete six courses in their testa- 
ment of specialization and two in the other testa- 
ment. Two courses may be devoted to any aspect 
of communication of the word, hermeneutics or 
application of the Bible to contemporary prob- 
lems. An M.A. thesis or major paper may substi- 
tute for six of the credit requirements. 

Certain courses in the Institute of Religious 
Education and Pastoral Ministry, including those 
offered in the summer, and courses in the schools 
of the Boston Theological Institute, may be used 
to fulfill the credit requirements. The student 
must register for six (6) credits of Thesis Semi- 
nar. 

The student must acquire a solid basic knowl- 
edge of the original language of their testament 
(Hebrew or Greek). Students may prove their 
competence by passing a test administered by the 
faculty. Students must also fulfill the ordinary 
M.A. requirement in either French or German. 

Students will be tested in three areas of the 
Bible: history, literature and theology. Examina- 
tions will be both written and oral. Students may 
arrange to write an M.A. thesis or to do a major 
research paper as part of the examinations. 

The Theology Department also cooperates 
with the Institute of Religious Education and Pas- 
toral Ministry and the Graduate Schools of Edu- 
cation and Social Work in offering the M.Ed, in 
Religious Education, the Certificate of Advanced 
Educational Specialization in Religious Educa- 
tion, the M.A. in Pastoral Ministry, the joint 
Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry (M.A.) and 
Master of Social Work (M.S.W.), and the Ph.D. 
in Religion and Education. (See Institute of Re- 
ligious Education and Pastoral Ministry) 

Doctoral Program 

The Department of Theology offers two Ph.D. 
Programs and sponsors several Institutes. 

B.C. Andover Newton Theological School 
Ph.D. in Theological Studies 

In a Joint Doctoral Program with Andover New- 
ton Theological School, the Boston College De- 
partment of Theology offers the Ph.D. in Theo- 
logical Studies. 

The Joint Doctoral Program in Theological 
Studies has as its goal the formation of theologians 
able to offer intellectual leadership to the acad- 
emy, to the church, and to society. Accordingly, 
the program aims at nourishing a community of 
scholarly conversation, research and teaching that 
is centered in the study of Christian life and 
thought, past and present, in a way that contrib- 
utes to this goal. 

The Program is founded on the conviction 
that theology is an enterprise that invites the in- 
tegration of Christian commitment and partici- 
pation in communities of faith with pursuit of the 
highest standards of academic inquiry. The 



question of how this invitation informs the stud- 
ies that such an enterprise involves is part of the 
ongoing conversation that the program seeks to 
foster. 

The Program belongs, equally, to two schools, 
each of which is rooted in and committed to a 
theological tradition: the Reformed tradition at 
Andover Newton Theological School and the 
Roman Catholic tradition at Boston College. It 
has as one of its intrinsic components a call for 
critical and constructive dialogue, both with other 
theological positions and with contemporary civi- 
lization. 

Creative theological discussion and special- 
ized research today require ecumenical, interdis- 
ciplinary, and cross-cultural cooperation, espe- 
cially in the quest for common theological and 
philosophical foundations. 

The program thus endeavors to provide its 
students with an education that is integrative 
rather than narrowly specialized, and one that is 
set within the context of the Christian church in 
all of its ecumenical and confessional diversity, 
and in its relation to contemporary culture. The 
program is thus confessional in nature and theol- 
ogy is done as faith seeking understanding. 

The Joint Doctoral Program is rigorous in its 
demands that students master the Christian theo- 
logical tradition and probe critically the founda- 
tions of various theological positions. Students are 
expected to master the tools and techniques of re- 
search, and thus to organize and integrate their 
knowledge in order to make an original contri- 
bution to theological discussion. 

The program hopes to prepare students for 
both academic vocations and other ministries, 
such as church administration, theological re- 
newal and new ministries, where theological ex- 
pertise is increasingly felt to be necessary. 
Areas of Specialization are as follows: History 
of Christian Life and Thought, Systematic The- 
ology, and Christian Ethics. 

The concentration in the History of Christian 
Life and Thought examines historical forms of 
Christian faith, theology and doctrine, behavior, 
ritual, and institutional development, as well as 
the problems connected with the assumptions of 
historical reconstruction. The area of Systematic 
Theology is the contemporary intellectual reflec- 
tion on the Christian mysteries as an interrelated 
whole. Christian Ethics brings the sociology of 
religion and Christian social ethics together as 
ways of exploring and giving normative guidance 
to involvement of the church in culture and soci- 
ety. A minor in Biblical studies is also offered. 

Among the more distinctive features of this 
program are the Graduate Colloquia. They bring 
together, in a regular seminar, students from all 
areas of specialization with faculty members from 
the various fields in order to study the great books 
of the Christian theological tradition, and thereby 
examine (1) the fundamental presuppositions out 
of which the major cultural and social develop- 
ments of the tradition emerged, and (2) the roots 
of disciplinary study that are presupposed by dis- 
ciplinary work. 

The combination of a Protestant School of 
Divinity and a Catholic University, within the 
larger possibilities of the Boston Theological In- 
stitute, produces faculty and library resources very 
favorable for study. 



76 • Graduate Arts and Sciences •Theology 



The language examinations, which test the 
student's proficiency in reading two languages, 
important for his or her research, must be passed 
before admission to the comprehensive examina- 
tions. 

Students admitted to the program will have 
completed the M.Div. or equivalent degree or will 
have completed a bachelor's program with a 
strong background in religion, theology and/or 
philosophy. 

Students are required to take six courses in 
their major field of concentration, two to four in 
their minor and two in each of the other two fields 
of study during 2 years of full-time coursework. 
Opportunities for stipends and dissertation fel- 
lowships as well as Teaching Assistants and 
Teaching Fellows are available. Both written and 
oral examinations will be given in the candidates' 
major and minor fields of study. A dissertation 
must be completed before the awarding of the 
Ph.D. Tuition fellowships and stipends are avail- 
able. 

B.C. Weston Ph.D. in Theological Ethics 

In a Joint Doctoral Program with Weston School 
of Theology, the Department also offers a Ph.D. 
in Theological Ethics. The program prepares its 
graduates for teaching and research positions that 
call for specialization in Roman Catholic theo- 
logical ethics or moral theology. It also includes 
the ecumenical study of major Protestant think- 
ers, and it attends to the Biblical foundations and 
theological contexts of ethics. In line with the con- 
viction that faith and reason are complementary, 
the program explores the contributions of philo- 
sophical thought, both past and present. It has a 
strong social ethics component, as well as offer- 
ings in other areas of applied ethics. The explo- 
ration of contemporary ethics is set in a critical, 
historical perspective and encourages attention to 
the global and multicultural character of Roman 
Catholicism. Tuition fellowships and Teaching 
Assistant stipends are available. 

The language examinations, which test the 
student's proficiency in reading two languages, 
important for his or her research, must be passed 
before admission to the comprehensive examina- 
tions. 

Students admitted to the program should have 
completed the M.Div. or equivalent degree; a 
Master's degree in religion, theology, or philoso- 
phy, or a bachelor's program with a strong back- 
ground in religion, theology and/or philosophy. 

Religious Education-Pastoral Ministry 

See separate listing under Religious Education 
and Pastoral Ministry section. 

Institute of Medieval Philosophy and 
Theology 

In conjunction with the Joint Doctoral Program 
with Andover Newton Theological School, the 
Department is also linked to the Institute of Me- 
dieval Philosophy and Theology. The institute is 
a center that unites the teaching and research ef- 
forts of faculty members in the Theology and 
Philosophy Departments who specialize in medi- 
eval philosophy and theology. Doctoral degrees 
are awarded in the Theology (or Philosophy) 
Department, and students study within one of 
these departments. The focus of the institute is 
the relationship between medieval philosophy and 



theology and modern continental philosophy and 
theology. The concentration of the philosophy 
and theology departments at Boston College is in 
modern continental thought, so the context for 
carrying on a dialogue between medieval and 
modern philosophy and theology is well estab- 
lished. 

To foster this dialogue and encourage the 
scholarly retrieval of the great medieval intellec- 
tual world, the institute offers graduate student 
fellowships and assistantships, sponsors speakers 
programs, runs a faculty-student seminar to in- 
vestigate new areas of medieval philosophical and 
theological research, and runs a research center 
to assist in the publication of monographs and 
articles in the diverse areas of medieval philoso- 
phy and theology, to encourage the translation of 
medieval sources and the editing of philosophi- 
cal and theological texts. 

The Lonergan Center 

Studies related to the work of the Jesuit theolo- 
gian and philosopher Bernard Lonergan (1904- 
1984) have a focus in the Lonergan Center at 
Boston College. Inaugurated in 1986, the Cen- 
ter houses a growing collection of Lonergan's 
published and unpublished writings as well as sec- 
ondary materials and reference works, and it also 
serves as a seminar and meeting room. The Cen- 
ter is on the fourth level of Bapst Library and is 
open during regular hours as posted. The direc- 
tor is Professor Charles C. Hefling, Jr. 

Boston College sponsors the Lonergan Insti- 
tute, which provides resources, lectures, and 
workshops for the study of the thought of Ber- 
nard Lonergan, S.J. 

Joseph Gregory McCarthy Lecture 
Series 

The Joseph Gregory McCarthy Lecture Series, 
established by Dr. Eugene and Maureen 
McCarthy (and family) in the memory of their 
son, Joseph Gregory McCarthy, is held annually. 
The Joseph Gregory McCarthy Visiting Profes- 
sor offers a series of lectures and student and fac- 
ulty discussions about contemporary theological 
and religious issues. 

The 1994-95 Joseph Gregory McCarthy Vis- 
iting Professor is Professor Johannes Baptist 
Metz. Additional details about the Joseph Gre- 
gory McCarthy Lecture Series can be obtained 
from the Department of Theology. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

TH 263 The Bible and Politics (S: 3) 

This course is an examination of the political 
teachings of the Bible and their implications. The 
emphasis is on the contrast between the biblical 
and the philosophic understandings of politics, as 
well as between the Jewish and Christian under- 
standings of the same problem. 

Ernest Fortin, A.A. 

TH 323 Northern Ireland Conflict (F: 3) 

The long-stagnant Northern Ireland conflict will 
be studied particularly in the denial syndrome that 
has paralyzed progress toward its resolution. Eco- 
nomic, social and political factors, security prob- 
lems, the legal system and methods of suppres- 
sion, and the psychological dynamic of the con- 
flict in the perceptions of parties within and 



outside Northern Ireland, as well as the peculiar 
passivity of U.S. response will be studied. 

Raymond G. Helmick, S.J. 
TH 325 Lebanon: Focal Point of Conflict (S: 3) 

Lebanon, with its history of pluralist tolerance 
dating back to the early 17th century, has fallen 
into extremes of communal violence and become 
the proxy battle-field for the conflicts of other 
nations in the Middle East and elsewhere. The 
course examines what is internal and what exter- 
nal to Lebanon in the conflict, its relation to the 
broader crisis of the Middle East and prospects 
for the recovery of the nation's territorial integ- 
rity and independence. 

Raymond G. Helmick, S.J. 

TH 341 Isaiah: Chapters 1-66 (S: 3) 

This course deals with the dominant themes of 
Book of Isaiah (1-66). Historical, geographical, 
and archaeological setting considered in detail. 
Emphasis, however, is on the meaning of the text 
of Isaiah then and now. Hebrew is not required. 

Philip King 

TH 347 Cosmos and Purpose: How to Live in a 
Pointless Universe (F: 3) 

Today's sciences have suggested that the evolu- 
tion of the universe serves no goal. This course 
wants to take stock of the scientific data on which 
this judgment has been based. Other dimensions, 
such as religion, will be explored. Attention will 
be paid to the consequences that the different 
points of view have for the existence not just of 
individuals but of human society as well. 

Joop Schopman 

TH 350 Gospel of Matthew (F: 3) 

This is a detailed study of Matthew as a literary 
and theological work with special attention to its 
setting in first century Judaism and Christianity 
and its relationship to the other gospels. 
Matthew's implications for Christian thought and 
behavior will be stressed. An introductory course 
in Biblical studies is presumed. 

Anthony J. Saldarini 

TH 354 Theology and the Law (F, S: 3) 

This course will ( 1 ) educate students about the re- 
lationship between theology and law as that rela- 
tionship has been understood by selected theolo- 
gians, classical and modern, and by their critics; 
and (2) encourage students to begin to think about 
the social and personal values that underlie and 
inform theological positions on the law. The 
course will follow the chronological of the devel- 
opment of Western theology. Alan Ray 

TH 357 Pauline Tradition (F: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the letters and 
mission of St. Paul. It surveys archaeological, lit- 
erary and theological approaches to reading Paul's 
letters as sources for understanding the develop- 
ment of early Christianity. Special attention will 
be given to the interpretation of 1 Corinthians. 

Pheme Perkins 

TH 380 Perspectives on Hinduism (F: 3) 

The religious traditions of Hinduism offer rich 
possibilities for students of all interests. Empha- 
sizing the classical traditions, this course intro- 
duces Hindu myth, theology, imagery, ritual, lives 
of saints, ethics and mysticism. 

Francis X. Clooney, S.J. 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Theology • 77 



TH 423 (CL 320) Seminar in Latin Petrology 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: Latin 

This is a critical and philological examination, 
in the original, of a genre, author, problem, or pe- 
riod in the history of Latin patristic literature. 
This semester the seminar will be devoted to the 
study of Lactantius. Margaret A. Scbatkin 

TH 425 (CL 323) Seminar in Greek Petrology 
(F:3) 

Prerequisite: Greek 

This is a critical and philological examination, 
in the original, of a genre, author, problem, or pe- 
riod in the history of Greek patristic literature. 
This semester will be devoted to the study of John 
Chrysostom. Margaret A. Scbatkin 

TH 433 Foundations in Christian Ethics (F: 3) 

This course is designed to serve as an introduc- 
tion to Catholic ethics for graduate students ei- 
ther in the Theology department or the Institute 
of Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry. It 
will examine the nature and historical develop- 
ment of Moral Theology and will attempt an in- 
depth consideration of such issues as the moral 
agent, objective moral norms, the nature and for- 
mation of personal conscience, traditional and 
contemporary understandings of sin as well as an 
examination of the ethics of character. 

James A. O'Dofioboe 

TH 445 Faith and Reason in the Middle Ages 
(F:3) 

This is a study of the encounter between divine 
revelation (Jerusalem) and Greek philosophy 
(Athens) as the grounds of two distinct and irre- 
ducibly different ways of life. Primary sources 
include Plato, Lucretius, Cicero, Basil the Great, 
Augustine, Farabi, Averroes, Bonaventure, Tho- 
mas Aquinas, and the famous condemnation of 
1277. Ernest Fortin, A.A. 

TH 450 Challenge and Crisis in Catholic 
Theology after Vatican II: The Work of Johann 
Baptist Metz (F: 3) 

This seminar will first study major developments 
in European and German theology in the twen- 
tieth century. Representative writings from Pro- 
fessor Metz's work will be studied and 
contextualized within modern and contemporary 
ecclesial, philosophical, historical, and social chal- 
lenges and crises. Matthew Lamb will conduct this 
introductory part of the seminar. The main por- 
tion of the seminar will be lectures by Professor 
Metz himself. His lectures will deal with such 
themes as the God-Crisis in contemporary Chris- 
tianity, the idolatry of time, apocalyptic expecta- 
tion and anamnestic solidarity as fundamental to 
a discovery of reason in the face of suffering, the 
Holocaust and Germany today. 

Johannes Baptist Metz 
Matthew Lamb 

TH 451 Love in Contemporary Christian Ethics 
(F:3) 

This course will carefully analyze important se- 
lected texts on the meaning and moral implica- 
tions of Christian love. Focus will be on contem- 
porary approaches to neighbor-love, including 
theories of self-sacrifice, equal regard, solidarity, 
and mutuality. Theological and philosophical 
topics include the moral status of self-love, the 



relation of love and justice, love and political vio- 
lence, the ordering of love, and the significance 
of the love of God for the moral life. Authors stud- 
ied include Hallett, Outka, Gutierrez, Farley, and 
Vacek. Stephen J. Pope 

TH 473 Theology of the Church (S: 3) 

As a theological exercise of faith seeking under- 
standing, this course will begin with the creedal 
statement of faith in "one, holy, catholic and ap- 
ostolic church," and seek an understanding of the 
mystery of the church, especially in the light of 
the teaching of the Second Vatican Council. 

Francis A. Sullivan, SJ. 

TH 476 The Development of Theology as a 
Discipline in the Middle Ages (F: 3) 

This is a historical study of the way the academic 
reading of the Holy Scriptures developed into the 
university discipline of theology. The course ex- 
amines the roles played by Scripture, by patristic 
and medieval authorities, and by philosophy in 
theological inquiry. The sources for this study are 
the translated primary texts of authors from 
Abelard to Melanchthon. Stephen F. Brown 

TH 480 Introduction to Ecclesiology (S: 3) 

This course will focus on Vatican IPs declaration, 
"The Dogmatic Constitution of the Church." 
The following themes will be developed: the 
Church as mystery, as the people of God, as the 
temple of the Holy Spirit, as the Body of Christ, 
as the universal sacrament, and the like. The 
meaning and justification of the claim that Jesus 
founded the Church and that it subsists in the 
Catholic Church will also be examined. 

The Department 

TH 489 The Bishop and the Mission of Witness 
to Society (S: 3) 

This course will focus on the role of the bishop 
as the leader of the diocesan church, on the mean- 
ing of inculturation, and the role of the bishop as 
public forgiver in his own right. 

Bishop Francisco Claver, S.J. 

TH 490 Religious Experience and Faith (S: 3) 

The goal of this course is to compare views of faith 
found in the Bible, some Church Fathers, Tho- 
mas Aquinas, Rousseau, Newman and Lonergan. 
We shall ask whether a stress on religious experi- 
ence is compatible with a complete respect for ob- 
jective truth. We shall examine the interaction 
between the affective and the intellectual aspects 
of faith. Louis Roy, O.P. 

TH 492 Medieval Christian Life (S: 3) 

This course will examine the spiritual climate and 
culture of Medieval Europe and will focus on 
Christian life, worship, and thought. 

The Department 

TH 498 Theology of Christian Mysticism (S: 3) 

This course focuses upon the essence of Chris- 
tian mysticism as a way of life involving the 
person's purification by, illumination by, and 
eventual union with the God of love by examin- 
ing Old Testament and New Testament mysti- 
cism as well as the mysticism and/or mystical the- 
ology of fifty-five figures in the Christian tradi- 
tion from Origen to Karl Rahner. 

Harvey Egan, S.J. 



TH 500 Public Theology and Public Philosophy 
(S:3) 

The course begins with the more biblical/theo- 
logical approach of Reinhold Niebuhr and the 
more reasoned/philosophical stress of John 
Courtney Murray and explores more recent de- 
velopments in theology, ethics, and social theory 
with authors as Tracy, Placher, Himes and 
Himes, Mouw, Tanner, Milbank, Theimann. 

David Hollenbach, S.J. 

TH 507 Comparative Theology and the 
Theology of Religions 

Comparative theology explores Christian theo- 
logical issues in the context of extended reflection 
on the texts of other religions; reading Christian 
and non-Christian texts together, it seeks to com- 
bine Christian faithfulness with a readiness to be 
changed, intellectually as well as spiritually, by 
non-Christian ideas. The subsequent theology of 
religions rethinks Christian views about religions 
in a broadened context that now includes non- 
Christian ideas, images, words. For its examples, 
this course uses primary texts from the classical 
Hindu traditions of India, in correlation with ap- 
propriate Biblical and Christian theological texts. 
The course is intended for graduate students and 
advanced undergraduates, but no specific prereq- 
uisites. Francis X. Clooney, S.J. 

TH 525 Medieval Theology I (S: 3) 

This is a study of key theological figures from 
Abelard to Aquinas with a focus on their 
Christology and Trinitarian teachings. 

Stephen F. Brown 

TH 530 Field Education and Supervised 
Practicum in Pastoral Ministry (S: 3) 

See course description under Institute of Reli- 
gious Education and Pastoral Ministry. 

Claire Lowery 

TH 538 Directed Research in Pastoral Ministry 
(F, S: 3) 

See course description under Institute of Reli- 
gious Education and Pastoral Ministry. 

Claire Lowery 

TH 542 Theological Dialogue with Buddhism: 
Meditations and Doctrines (F: 3) 

This is an advanced introduction to and dialogi- 
cal encounter with Buddhism through primary 
sources. Having situated our study in relation to 
theology of religions, we will study ancient scrip- 
tural passages and then contemporary writings in 
translation by Tibetan and Chinese Buddhist 
masters that articulate different ways Buddhist 
doctrines, constructing holistic world views, are 
related to practices of meditation. We conclude 
by discussing writings of contemporary Christian 
scholars who have reflected comparatively on 
their encounters with Buddhism (e.g., Swearer, 
Pieris, or Pallis). John Makransky 

TH 543 Magisterium and Theology (F: 3) 

A Catholic theologian must not only be able to 
distinguish the literary genres in the Bible, and 
know how to interpret biblical texts, he or she 
must also be able to evaluate the various kinds of 
documents issued by the magisterium, and know 
how to interpret them. This course will acquaint 
the student with guidelines for evaluating and in- 
terpreting documents of the magisterium. 

Francis A. Sullivan, S.J. 



78 • Graduate Arts and Sciences • Theology 



TH 544 Church and Salvation (S: 3) 

Vatican II described the church as the "universal 
sacrament of salvation." Post-conciliar documents 
have described the goal of the church as "integral 
salvation." This course will discuss issues that 
these claims have raised, for systematic theology, 
for ecumenism, for the theology of non-Christian 
religions, and for liberation theology. 

Francis A. Sullivan, S.J. 

TH 545 The Spiritual Disciplines of Buddhists in 
Asia (S: 3) 

This course will serve as an advanced introduc- 
tion to Mahayana Buddhism through a study of 
its practices (Mahayana is the form of Buddhism 
now practiced in Tibet, China, Japan, Korea). 
Traditional practices of devotion, ethical disci- 
pline, ritual, and art will be analyzed in relation 
to Mahayana Buddhist psychology, philosophy 
and methods of meditation. Primary source read- 
ings will include descriptions of religious practices 
and autobiographies by Indian, Tibetan and Chi- 
nese Buddhist masters. Prior study of religion or 
of Asian cultures is highly recommended. 

John Makransky 

TH 546 The Eucharist in Ecumenical Perspective 

(F:3) 

In the light of contemporary ecumenical devel- 
opments that have been uncovering much that is 
common in the sacramental traditions of the dif- 
ferent churches, this course will discuss the fol- 
lowing: sacraments and sacramentality, the Eu- 
charist as central sacrament, its biblical back- 
ground, the New Testament accounts of institu- 
tion, patristic and historical development, and 
systematic analysis. Robert J. Daly, S.J. 

TH 547 The Eucharistic Prayer (S: 3) 

This is a theological, literary, and structural analy- 
sis of the Hebrew background of the eucharistic 
prayer, its various main developments in the 
Christian East and West, and, in the context of 
liturgical renewal, the recent flowering of at- 
tempts to construct new eucharistic prayers. 

Robert J Daly, S.J. 

TH 561 Christian Ethics and Social Issues (S: 3) 

Methods and sources for Christian ethical analy- 
sis, decision making, and policy formation in the 
areas of religious liberty, economic justice, human 
rights, and war and peace, the role of Christians 
and the ministry of the church in the political 
sphere. This course is of special interest to 
IREPM students. David Hollenbach, S.J. 

TH 576 Aquinas' Treatise on God (F: 3) 

This is an in-depth study of the inner logic and 
dialectic of the treatise on the one God, in Summa 
Tbeologiae, Questions 2-26. Several other writings 
of Aquinas will also be examined. Although 
knowledge of Latin will not be required, reference 
will be made to key Latin words. It is an exercise 
in Thomist interpretation, in relation to histori- 
cal sources and other perspectives, ancient or 
modern. Louis Roy, 0. P. 

TH 605 Integrative Colloquium: Theology and 
Pastoral Practice (F: 3) 

See course description under Institute of Reli- 
gious Education and Pastoral Ministry. 

Claire Lowery 



TH 610 (ED 636) Biblical Spiritualities for the 
Educational Ministry (S: 3) 

See course description under Institute of Reli- 
gious Education and Pastoral Ministry. 

Mary C. Boys 

TH 660 Women and the Family in Ancient 
Israel (F: 3) 

This is an examination of the status of the woman 
in the ancient Israelite family as daughter, sister, 
wife, mother, and widow in a kinship-based pa- 
triarchal society. The models and methods of 
contemporary scholars using gender as an analyti- 
cal category will be investigated in an attempt to 
reconstruct the history of women in ancient Is- 
rael. Paula Hiebert 

TH 717 (ED 635) The Education of Christians: 
Past, Present and Future (S: 3) 

See course description under Institute of 
Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry. 

Thomas Groome 

TH 801 Thesis Seminar (F, S: 6) 

A research course under the guidance of a faculty 
member for those writing a six-credit Master's 
Thesis. The Department 

TH 802 Thesis Direction (F: 0-S: 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their thesis. This course mujst be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 

TH 812 Understanding Book of Exodus (F: 3) 

This course deals with the theology of Exodus, em- 
phasizing dominant themes (exodus, election, 
covenant, etc.). Selected passages are to be 
exegeted in detail. Knowledge of Hebrew desir- 
able but not required. Introductory course or 
equivalent required. Philip King 

TH 814 Psychoanalysis and Ethics (F: 3) 

The seminar will explore the intersection between 
the psychoanalytic perspective on human behav- 
ior and motivation and the science of ethics. The 
approach will be exploratory, investigating the 
origins of psychoanalytic concepts in Freud's 
thinking and their evolution into current perspec- 
tives. The emphasis will fall on the degree to 
which ethical perspectives are implicit in the psy- 
choanalytic orientation, and the related question 
of whether psychoanalysis has any fundamental 
perceptions of the human condition that are rel- 
evant to the ethical process. 

William J. Meissner, S.J. 

TH 824 Ministry in the Early Church (F: 3) 

The statement of Vatican II that the Church of 
Christ "subsists in the Catholic Church" depends 
heavily on the validity of the claim that the min- 
isterial structure of the Catholic Church repre- 
sents the divinely willed development of the min- 
istry in the early Church. This course will exam- 
ine the grounds of that claim, in the New Testa- 
ment and in the documents of the first three cen- 
turies. Francis A. Sullivan, S.J. 

TH 826 Introduction to the Old Testament (F: 3) 

A survey of the religious, literary, and political 
history of ancient Israel as it is contained in the 
Old Testament. The methods and results of mod- 
ern scholarship will be used in an attempt to 



understand the Hebrew Scriptures in their origi- 
nal cultural and historical context. Paula Hiebert 

TH 827 Introduction to the New Testament 

(S:3) 

Historical, sociological and literary methods are 
introduced, evaluated and applied to canonical 
texts. Special attention is given to issues of unity/ 
diversity in early Christian thought and the rel- 
evance of Scripture to modern faith. 

Anthony J. Saldarini 

TH 832 Trinitarian Missions and the Human 
Good (S: 3) 

This course will depart from the Missions of the 
Trinity to explore the dynamics of the Christian 
conversation as it develops in the life, belief and 
thinking of Christians. Christian faith is intrinsi- 
cally related to the concrete outcome of human 
acts of knowing, deciding and acting (the human 
good) as conversational, both as setting concrete 
conditions for human conversations as broken 
down, thwarted, or unable to occur (redemption), 
and as attracting and drawing human beings into 
the epitome of conversation which is the Trinity. 

Frederick Lawrence 

TH 855 Systematic Theology I (F: 3) 

Systematic theology explores the Christian faith 
as an organic whole, the full range of the Chris- 
tian mysteries, their inner coherence and har- 
mony, their intelligible relationships to each other 
and to the totality of the Christian faith, order- 
ing principles, and the like. Harvey Egan, S.J. 

TH 856 Systematic Theology II (S: 3) 

This seminar will introduce some of the major 
developments in doctrinal and systematic theol- 
ogy. The development of doctrine from Scrip- 
tures will be studied in the writings of St. 
Anthanasius and St. Augustine. The development 
of systematic reflection from doctrine will be 
studied in certain key writings of St. Thomas 
Aquinas. Finally, the development of historical 
consciousness from systematics will be studied in 
Bernard Lonergan's Method in Theology. 

Matthew Lamb 

TH 860 Ministry in Vatican II Ecclesiologies 
(F:3) 

The course examines the various ecclesiologies 
contained in or implied by the documents of the 
Second Vatican council. The various ways of en- 
visioning both ordained and non-ordained 
ministries. Michael Himes 

TH 864 The Local Church under Third World 
Status (S: 3) 

This course will explore the stress under which 
third world churches are living with specific ref- 
erence to the Philippines. Topics to be considered 
include the following: What societal turmoil and 
social stress do to the Church as an institution and 
to its participants; ways by which theological un- 
derstanding is affected in relation to hierarchies 
and local concerns; and how such understanding 
challenges models of the unity and diversity of 
theological understanding and expression. 

Bishop Francisco Claver, S.J. 

TH 879 The Family 

The family will be investigated from a variety of 
perspectives, including the biblical, theological, 
feminist, and cross-cultural. Several documents of 
the Roman Catholic Church will be considered. 



Graduate Arts and Sciences • Theology • 79 



Most readings will be contemporary, but histori- 
cal connections will be made. We will work to- 
ward a normative Christian theological under- 
standing of the family today. Lisa Cahill 

TH 880 Psychotherapy and Spirituality (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This course explores the theoretical and prac- 
tical integration of theological and psychological 
perspectives in the practice of clinical psycho- 
therapy as well as in the practice of pastoral coun- 
seling and spiritual direction. Among the ques- 
tions we will consider are these: How might we 
adequately name and work with a spiritual dimen- 
sion within secular psychotherapy? What distinc- 
tions are useful to draw between spiritual direc- 
tion and psychotherapy? What attention to psy- 
chological process and dynamics is required in 
responsible spiritual direction? Participation is 
particularly encouraged by social work graduate 
students as well as masters students in counseling 
psychology, spiritual formation and pastoral care. 

John McDargh 

TH 881 John of the Cross (F: 3) 

This is an analysis of the major works of John of 
the Cross to determine the origins and character 
of contemplation and its development into per- 
fect union with God. This course brings inquiry 
to bear upon the issues raised by these writings 
and their application to the lives of the student. 
The poetry, counsels, and theology of John of the 
Cross will be supplemented by concomitant read- 
ings in Ernest Becker, The Denial of Death, Albert 
Nolan, Jesus Before Christianity, and Teilhard de 
Chardin, The Divine Milieu. 

Michael J. Buckley, S.J. 

TH 885 Life, Structure, Thought in the Christian 
Community to 1 500 (F: 3) 

This is a one-semester survey of major themes in 
the history of Christianity to 1 500. Topics for 
study and discussion will include the development 
of church organization and structure; monasti- 
cism; forms of religious dissent and reform; spiri- 
tuality; pastoral care and popular piety. 

Patricia DeLeeuw 
TH 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 
For those students who have not yet passed the 
Master's Comprehensive but prefer not to assume 
the status of a non-matriculating student for the 
one or two semesters, used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

TH 899 Readings and Research (F, S: 3) 
In rare cases where regular courses do not meet 
the needs of students, independent research may 
be arranged by a student with a faculty member. 
Professor's written consent, on a form obtained 
from the department, must be secured prior to 
registration. The Department 

TH 901 (ED 735) Traditions of Religion and 
Education (F: 3) 

See course description under Institute of Reli- 
gious Education and Pastoral Ministry. 

Mary C. Boys 

TH 983 Second Year Graduate Colloquium 

(S:3) 

This course is limited to, and required of, students 
in the BC-ANTS Joint Doctoral Program in their 
second year of residency. All second-year students 



should consult with the Director of Graduate 
Studies, prior to registration, about the correct 
procedure to be used in registering for this course. 

Charles Hefiing 
Mark Heim 

TH 990 First Year Graduate Colloquium (S: 3) 

This course is limited to, and required of, students 
in the BC-ANTS Joint Doctoral Program in their 
first year of residency. All first-year students 
should consult with the Director of Graduate 
Studies, prior to registration, about the correct 
procedure to be used in registering for this course. 

Charles Hefiing 
Mark Heim 

TH 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (F: 0-S: 0) 

For students who have not yet passed the Doc- 
toral Comprehensive but prefer not to assume the 
status of a non-matriculating student for the one 
or two semesters used for preparation for the 
comprehensive. The Department 

TH 999 Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. 



80 • Gradiatf School of Education • Faculty 



Graduate School of Education 



FACULTY 

Francis J. Kelly, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Boston 
College; A.M., Columbia University; D.Ed., 
Harvard University 

Mary T. Kinnane, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
H. Dip. Ed., Liverpool University; A.M., 
University of Kansas; Ph.D., Boston College 

Pierre Lambert, Professor Emeritus; B.S., M.Ed., 
Boston College; Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

Vincent C. Nuccio, Professor Emeritus; A.B., 
Boston College; M.E., D.Ed., Cornell University 

Edward J. Power, Professor Emeritus; B.A., St. 
John's University; M.S.Ed., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame 

Irving Hurwitz, Associate Professor Emeritus; A. B . , 
Ph.D., Clark University 

Mary Griffith, Associate Professor Emeritus; B.A., 
Mundelein College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago 

Peter W. Airasian, Professor; A.B., Harvard 
University; A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Albert Beaton, Professor; B.S., State Teacher's 
College at Boston; M.Ed., Ed.D., Harvard 
University 

Mary M. Brabeck, Professor and Associate Dean; 
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.S., St. Cloud 
State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

M. Beth Casey, Professor; A.B., University of 
Michigan; A.M., Ph.D., Brown University 

John S. Dacey, Professor; A.B., Harpur College; 
M.Ed., Ph.D., Cornell University 

WalterM. Haney, Professor; B.S., Michigan State 
University; Ed.M., Ed.D., Harvard University 

William K Kilpatrick, Professor; B.S., Holy Cross 
College; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

GeorgeT. Ladd, Professor; B.S., State University 
College at Oswego, New York; M.A.T., D.Ed., 
Indiana University 

George F. Madaus, Boisi Professor; B.S., College 
of the Holy Cross; M.Ed., State College of 
Worcester; D.Ed., Boston College 

Ronald L. Nuttall, Professor; A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

Gerald J. Pine, Professor and Dean; A.B., M.Ed., 
Boston College; Ed.D., Boston University 

Diana C. Pullin, Professor; B.A., Grinnell College; 
M.A.,J.D., Ph.D., The University of Iowa 

John Savage, Professor; A.B., Iona College; Ed.D., 
Boston University 

John F. Traversjr., Professor; B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., 
Boston College 

Mary E. Walsh, Professor; B.A., Catholic 
University; M.A., Ph.D., Clark University 



Penny Hauser-Cram, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Denison University; M.A., Tufts University; 
Ed.D., Harvard University 

Richard M. Jackson, Associate Professor; A.B., 
American International College; Ed.M., Harvard 
University; Ed.D., Columbia University 

John A. Jensen, Associate Professor; A. B ., Cornell 

University; A.M., Ed.D., University of Rochester 

JoanCJones, Associate Prvfessor;B.S., Northwest 
Missouri State Teachers College; M.Ed., 
University ofMissouri; Ed.D., Boston University 

John B. Junkala, Associate Professor; B.S., State 
College of Fitchburg; M.Ed., Boston University; 
D.Ed., Syracuse University 

Maureen E. Kenny, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Brown University; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Larry Ludlow, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., 
California State University; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago 

M. Brinton Lykes, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Hollins College; M.Div., Harvard University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Lea McGee, Associate Professor; B.S., Miami 
University; M.A., Old Dominion University; 
Ed.D., Virginia Tech 

Jean Mooney, Associate Professor; A.B., Smith 
College; A.M., Stanford University; Ph.D., 
Boston College 

Bernard A. O'Brien, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Boston College; A.M., Ph.D., Catholic University 
of America 

Alec F. Peck, Associate Professor; B. A., University 
of San Francisco; M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University 

Joseph Pedulla, Associate Professor; B.S., Tufts 
University; M.S., Northeastern University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Michael Schiro, Associate Professor; B.S., Tufts 
University; MAT., D.Ed., Harvard University 

Charles F. Smith, Jr. , Associate Professor; B . S . Ed . , 
Bowling Green State University; M.S., Kent 
State University; C.A.S., Harvard University; 
Ed.D., Michigan State University 

Edward B.Smith, A ssociate Professor; A.B.,M.A., 
Loyola University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Kenneth W. Wegner, Associate Professor; B.S., 
M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Kansas 

Ted I.K. Youn, Associate Professor; B. A., Denison 
University; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 
Philip DiMattia, Adjunct Associate Professor; B.S., 
M.Ed., Ph.D., Boston College 

Karen Arnold, Assistant Professor; B.A., B. Mus., 
Oberlin College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois 



Thomas Bidell, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., 
University of New Mexico; Ed.D., Harvard 
University 

Martha Bronson, Assistant Professor; B.A., Boston 
University; Ed.M., Ed.D., Harvard University 

Sandra L. Crump, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Northeastern University; M.Ed., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Kilburn E. CuMey, Assistant Professor; A.B., Tufts 
University; Ed.M., Boston University; Ph.D., 
Boston College 

Ralph Edwards, Assistant Professor; B.A., City 
College of New York; M.A., Bank Street College; 
Ed.D., Harvard University 

Jay T. King, Assistant Professor; B.S., Union 
College; M.Ed., Tufts University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Rhode Island 

James R. Mzhalik, Assistant Professor; B.S., M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

JosephM. O'Keefe, S.J. , Assistant Professor; B.A., 
College of the Holy Cross; M.A., Fordham 
University; M.Div.; S.T.L., Weston School of 
Theology; M.Ed., Ed.D., Harvard University 

Theresa Powell, Assistant Professor; Diploma, 
Posse School of Physical Education; B.S., Ed.D., 
Boston University 

Elizabeth Sparks, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Wellesley College; M.Ed., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Polly \J\ichny, Assistant Professor; B.A., University 
of Wisconsin; M.Ed., Boston University; Ed.D., 
Harvard University 

Nancy Zollers, Assistant Professor; B.S., M.A., 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

The mission of the Graduate School of Educa- 
tion is to prepare professionals and academics to 
make contributions to the knowledge base of their 
fields and to serve others in education and human 
services professions. The faculty of the Graduate 
School of Education is committed to research and 
professional preparation that is based on reflec- 
tive practice and the scientist-practitioner model. 
The curriculum is directed toward promoting 
social justice for children and families, particularly 
in urban settings and toward developing students' 
research skills and attitudes so that they will con- 
tribute to the knowledge base of their fields. The 
Graduate School of Education is administratively 
divided into two Departments. The Department 
of Curriculum, Administration, and Special Edu- 
cation (CASE) houses the programs that prepare 
individuals for roles as educators and administra- 
tors in higher education and school settings. The 
Department of Counseling, Developmental Psy- 
chology, and Research Methods (CDPRM) 



Graduatk School ok Education • Policies and Procedi ri s 



81 



houses the programs that prepare individuals for 
professions in applied psychology (Counseling, 
Educational/Developmental Psychology) and in 
research, measurement, and evaluation. 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

Admission 

Information about admission may be obtained by 
writing to the Office of Graduate Admissions, 
Graduate School of Education, Campion Hall 
103, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachu- 
setts 02167, or by calling the Graduate School of 
Education's Admissions office, 617-552-4214. 

The Boston College Graduate School of Edu- 
cation admits students without regard to race, 
religion, age, sex, marital or parental status, na- 
tional origin, veteran status or handicap. The 
School welcomes the presence of multiple and 
diverse cultural perspectives in its scholarly com- 
munity. 

Students must be formally admitted to the 
Graduate School of Education by an admissions 
committee composed of faculty and administra- 
tors. Students may apply to degree programs or 
may apply to study as a non-degree or Special 
Student. Please consult the Graduate School of 
Education Admissions Bulletin for complete in- 
formation. 

Official notification of admission is made by 
a written announcement from the Graduate 
School of Education. Students should not pre- 
sume admission until they receive this announce- 
ment. Admitted students are required to submit 
a non-refundable deposit of $100.00 by the date 
stipulated in the Admissions letter. The deposit 
is applied to tuition costs for the first semester of 
study. 

Deferral of Admission 

Admission may be deferred for up to one year. In 
order to qualify for deferral, the student must 
notify, in writing, the Graduate Admissions Of- 
fice, Campion Hall, Room 103, Boston College 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167. Deferred admissions 
must be requested in writing and must be ap- 
proved by the program faculty and Graduate 
School of Education administration. Students 
granted deferrals will be notified in writing. 

Prior to the semester in which the student 
matriculates, a letter must be sent to the School 
of Education Graduate Admissions Office indi- 
cating the intent to matriculate, with a non-re- 
fundable deposit of $100 to be credited toward the 
first semester of study. If the student intends to 
matriculate in the fall semester, the deposit is due 
by April 1. If matriculation will take place in the 
spring semester, the letter is due by November 1. 

Because of the volume of applications received 
each year by the Graduate School of Education, 
there can be no assurances of deferred admission 
and the above procedure must be followed. 

Admission for Foreign Students 

Foreign students (non-U.S. citizens who are not 
permanent U.S. residents) should address their re- 
quests for program admission information to the 
Graduate School of Education, Graduate Admis- 
sions Office, Campion Hall 103, Boston College, 
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02 167. Foreign stu- 
dents should send their completed application to 



the Graduate Admissions Office of the School of 
Education. All foreign student applicants for 
whom English is not a first language should take 
the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage) examination and indicate that their score 
be forwarded to the Graduate School of Educa- 
tion by the Educational Testing Service (Box 955, 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540 or 1947 Center 
Street, Berkeley, California 94794). Ordinarily a 
minimum score of 550 on this examination is ex- 
pected by the Graduate School of Education. In- 
formation about this examination can be obtained 
from the Educational Testing Service. 

Special Student (Non-degree status) 

Certain restrictions apply to courses available to 
special students. Professional coursework associ- 
ated with teacher certification or counseling 
psychology licensure (including practicum 
coursework) is reserved for degree students in 
these programs. Students who wish to become 
certified or licensed must gain admittance to a 
graduate degree program in the desired area. 
Other courses are restricted each semester in or- 
der to maintain class size. A listing of restricted 
courses is available in the Graduate Admissions 
Office in the School of Education each semester. 

A formal Special Student application, includ- 
ing official academic (graduate and undergradu- 
ate) transcripts, must be completed and sent to the 
Graduate School of Education, Office of Admis- 
sions, Campion Hall 103, prior to registration for 
classes. The transcript must be received by the 
first day of classes. Registration will not be per- 
mitted if the application is not complete. 

Although there is no limit on the number of 
courses a special student may take outside his or 
her degree program, no more than four (12 se- 
mester hours) courses, if appropriate, may be ap- 
plied toward a degree program in the Graduate 
School of Education. Courses taken as a special 
student may be applied to a degree program only 
after official acceptance into a degree program 
and with the consent of the student's advisor. 

Financial Aid 

For a full description of available financial aid, 
please refer to the University section of this cata- 
log. A variety of fellowships, assistantships, grant 
funding, and awards are available to students in 
master's and doctoral programs in Education. 
Graduate assistantships, particularly for students 
pursuing doctoral programs, are perhaps the most 
common forms of aid. However, several other aid 
programs are specifically designed for students in 
Education. 

The Donovan Teaching Scholars program was 
established in 1991 to identify and support highly 
qualified students entering the teaching profes- 
sion through one of our graduate certification 
programs. The program was created in honor of 
Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J., founding Dean of 
the School of Education, whose concern for ex- 
cellence in scholarship and teaching formed the 
basis of the Boston College tradition of teacher 
preparation. The program is designed to prepare 
students from a variety of liberal arts and sciences 
backgrounds who are interested in urban educa- 
tion. It requires no previous coursework in edu- 
cation. In addition to regular financial assistance 



available to all graduate students, a special tuition 
award is offered to Donovan Scholars. 

The Teacher Education Award for Minority Stu- 
dents (TR4M) is a scholarship program that offers 
varying amounts of tuition remission to academi- 
cally talented American minority students pursu- 
ing master's level teaching programs. Some schol- 
arship recipients are new to the teaching profes- 
sion, while others are veteran teachers with exten- 
sive histories of service in the classroom. The 
program began in 1990 as an avenue for Boston 
College to address the critical shortage of Afri- 
can American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native 
American (AHANA) teachers in the nation. 

Some Graduate School of Education students 
also are eligible to compete for several full-tuition 
fellowships with generous stipends and tuition 
remission, specifically for American AHANA stu- 
dents in doctoral programs. 

Applications mailed from the Graduate Ad- 
missions Office in the School of Education in- 
clude a special application for graduate assistant- 
ships. This application should be returned with the 
admissions application and is kept with the file as 
it passes through the review process. If a favor- 
able recommendation for admission is granted, 
the assistantship application is placed in a central 
holding file in the student's Department office. 
Students are contacted if their application for an 
assistantship has been selected. 

Current students seeking graduate assistantships 
should apply through their Departmental office. 
The Curriculum, Administration, and Special 
Education office is Campion 209 and the Coun- 
seling, Developmental Psychology, and Research 
Methods office is Campion 309. Current students 
must apply for graduate assistantships by March 
1 5 of each year. 

Students With Disabilities 

It is the goal of the Graduate School of Educa- 
tion to successfully prepare for the receipt of a 
degree and state certification or licensure any 
qualified individual who strives to meet these 
objectives regardless of disability. The University 
accepts the affirmative duty to take positive steps 
to educate handicapped persons and to assist them 
in career advancement. After an evaluation of a 
student's capacity to perform the essential pro- 
gram functions, the University will engage in any 
reasonable accommodation within its program 
that would allow a qualified student with a disabil- 
ity to complete the program successfully and to 
obtain certification or licensure so long as such ac- 
commodation does not result in waiver of com- 
petencies required for graduation, certification, or 
licensure. 

Certification, Licensure and Program 
Accreditation 

Many of the Curriculum and Instruction pro- 
grams offered by the Graduate School of Educa- 
tion have been designed to comply with current 
standards leading to professional certification for 
educators in the state of Massachusetts. Through 
the University's accreditation by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Educa- 
tion (NCATE) and the Interstate Certification 
Compact (ICC), a program of study leading to 
educator certification in Massachusetts will also 
provide graduates, through reciprocity, with 



82 • Graduate School of Education • Doctoral Degree Programs 



facilitated opportunities for certification in most 
other states. However, certification regulations in 
Massachusetts change, effective October 1, 1994, 
and students should plan programs carefully in 
light of these changes. Certification is granted by 
the state and requirements for certification and 
licensure are subject to change by the state. Es- 
pecially in the cases of out-of-state students, it is 
the responsibility of the student to plan a program 
that will lead to certification in a given state. The 
Graduate School of Education Office of Profes- 
sional Practicum Experience, Campion 135, can 
help with most teacher certification questions. 

The doctoral program in Counseling Psychol- 
ogy is fully accredited by the American Psycho- 
logical Association. Degree programs in Counsel- 
ing Psychology provide many of the professional 
education prerequisites for licensure in some 
states, including Massachusetts. Students are en- 
couraged to check the requirements for the states 
in which they eventually hope to obtain licensure 
to ascertain those requirements. The CDPRM 
office can help with questions about licensure in 
counseling. 

Degree Programs 

The Graduate School of Education offers the 
M.Ed., M.A., M.A.T.-M.S.T, C.A.E.S., D. Ed., 
and Ph.D. degrees. Graduate programs serve a 
dual purpose: (1) research — preparing students in 
research-based knowledge of their profession with 
specialized competence in the evaluation of edu- 
cational and psychological innovations and in 
basic quantitative and qualitative research meth- 
odologies; (2) practice — preparing students to 
apply knowledge in appropriate areas of 
specialization to practice in both academic and 
nonacademic settings. 

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

General Requirements for the Degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy 

The Ph.D. degree is granted for distinction at- 
tained in a special field of concentration and dem- 
onstrated ability to modify or enlarge a significant 
subject in a dissertation based upon original re- 
search. The Ph.D. is granted in the Graduate 
School of Education in the following areas: Coun- 
seling Psychology, Developmental/Educational 
Psychology, Curriculum and Instruction, Educa- 
tional Administration, Educational Research, 
Evaluation, and Measurement, and Higher Edu- 
cation Administration. A formal doctoral program 
of study is defined as a minimum of 84 graduate 
course credits earned subsequent to receipt of the 
Bachelor's degree. See the following descriptions 
for information about specific programs in the 
two departments in the Graduate School. Usually, 
students possess a Master's degree at the time of 
their admission to doctoral studies. Up to 30 
graduate course credits earned for the Master's 
may be applied toward this minimum of 84. No 
more than 6 graduate course credits with grades 
of B or better, earned outside Boston College, and 
approved by the program director and Associate 
Dean, may he transferred and applied to the Ph.D. 
Upon admission to a doctoral program, the 
doctoral student will be assigned an academic 
advisor. The doctoral program of studies will he 
designed by the student in consultation with his 



or her advisor during the first semester of 
coursework. 

Doctoral students in the Graduate School of 
Education, in addition to coursework, complete 
comprehensive exams, pass a computer compe- 
tency requirement, are admitted to doctoral can- 
didacy, and complete a doctoral dissertation. 

Program of Study 

A major field of concentration consisting of at 
least 30 graduate course credits must be included 
in the program of studies. One or two minor fields 
of concentration may be included, at least 9-12 
graduate course credits constitute a minor. Six 
credits of dissertation-related coursework are re- 
quired (customarily the Dissertation Departmen- 
tal Seminar and Dissertation Direction). 

The "Research Sequence" on the Doctoral 
Program of Studies Form lists the specific depart- 
mental requirements. This form may be obtained 
in the office of the Associate Dean of the School 
of Education. The program of studies for Coun- 
seling Psychology students is available in the of- 
fice of the Counseling, Developmental Psychol- 
ogy and Research Methods (CDPRM) Depart- 
ment, Campion 309. 

Upon matriculation, all doctoral students 
must obtain a copy and assume responsibility for 
the contents of the Doctoral Handbook, available 
at the office of the Associate Dean. The Hand- 
book contains essential information regarding all 
procedures to be followed within the doctoral 
program. Counseling Psychology and Develop- 
mental/Educational Psychology students should 
also consult the program handbook available in 
the Department office. 

Residence 

The goal of the residency requirement is to in- 
sure that a doctoral student experiences total im- 
mersion in the scholarly community of the uni- 
versity. Residence is defined as two consecutive 
semesters of one academic year during which the 
student is registered as a full-time student (four 
courses per semester) at the university. One year 
of full-time residence, defined as 12 credit hours 
of coursework in each of two consecutive semes- 
ters, is required. Doctoral students in Counsel- 
ing Psychology are required to complete three 
years of full-time residency. A plan of studies that 
meets the residency requirement must be ar- 
ranged by the student with the Department. Stu- 
dents who hold graduate assistantships fulfill the 
residency requirement with two courses per se- 
mester for two consecutive semesters. The resi- 
dency requirement is not satisfied by Summer 
Session attendance. 

Computer Competency Requirement 

Students must demonstrate competence in the use 
of computers. The form that documents such 
competencies is available from the office of the 
Associate Dean, Campion 101. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Doctoral students are required to complete a 
comprehensive examination. The comprehensive 
examination is administered by the student's pro- 
gram faculty and the student ought to consult with 
the faculty in each specific program regarding 
comprehensive examination requirements. Nor- 
mally comprehensive examinations are taken 



following the completion of course requirements. 
During the semester in which the student is tak- 
ing the comprehensive examination, he/she 
should register for Doctoral Co?nprehensives, ED/ 
PY 998.01 . No course credit is granted for Doc- 
toral Comprehensives registration. Student eligi- 
bility to take the doctoral comprehensive exami- 
nation is determined by the Program faculty and 
department chairperson. The following grades 
are assigned to Comprehensive examinations: 
Pass With Distinction (PwD), Pass (P), and Fail 
(F). One of these three grades is recorded on the 
student's transcript. Generally within two weeks 
following the exam, the Associate Dean's office 
will send the results in writing to the Registrar's 
Office and to the individual student. A student 
who fails the doctoral comprehensive examination 
may take it once again, not sooner than the fol- 
lowing semester, and at a time designated by the 
Department. In the case of a second failure, no 
further attempt is allowed. 

Admission to Candidacy 

The student who has passed the comprehensive 
examination and satisfied all requirements except 
the dissertation attains the status of "Doctoral 
Candidate." Doctoral candidates are required to 
register each semester and to pay a doctoral con- 
tinuation fee until completion of the dissertation. 

Ethical Research with Human Subjects 
Review 

Students in the Graduate School of Education 
who are completing research, including their 
doctoral dissertation, are required to complete the 
Human Subjects Research Review form available 
from the office of the Associate Dean. Students 
are required to submit this form with any research 
they conduct. The Human Subjects Research 
Review form is reviewed by the Associate Dean 
or delegate and the Human Subjects Ethical Re- 
search Review Committee. Following a review, 
the student is sent a letter approving the research 
or delineating the changes that the student must 
make to conform with the ethical guidelines for 
research with human participants. Students 
should consult the Ethical Principles of the 
American Psychological Association and the 
American Educational Research Association be- 
fore completing their research design. 

Dissertation 

Each doctoral candidate is required to complete 
a dissertation that is the result of original and in- 
dependent research and demonstrates advanced 
scholarly achievement. The subject of the disser- 
tation and the members of the doctoral disserta- 
tion committee must be approved by the office of 
the Associate Dean and the faculty dissertation 
committee. The research is performed under the 
direction of a faculty member who serves as chair- 
person of the dissertation, as well as at least two 
readers. The dissertation manuscript must be 
prepared according to the style and requirements 
of the Graduate School of Education. Informa- 
tion on these requirements is available in the 
Department offices and the office of the Associ- 
ate Dean. 

Acceptance of the Dissertation 

After a student has been admitted to candidacy, a 
dissertation committee, approved by the Associ- 
ate Dean, judges the substantial merit of the 



Graduate School of Education • Master's Degree Programs • 83 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

PROGRAM AND DEGREE OFFERINGS 



M.A. M.ED. M.A.T. M.S.T. C.A.E.S. PH.D. D.ED. 



Department of Counseling, Developmental 
Psychology and Research Methods (CDPRM) 

Counseling Psychology 


/ 






/ 


Developmental & 
Educational Psychology 


/ 




/ 


/ 


Educational Research, 
Measurement & Evaluation 




/ 




/ 


Early Childhood Education 


/ 


/ 







Department of Curriculum, Instruction 
and Special Education (CASE) 



Elementary Education 


/ 








Secondary Education 


/ 


/ 


/ 




Reading Specialist 


/ 






/ 



Low Incidence Special Needs 

(Severe Special Needs, Visually 
Handicapped Studies, Multi- 
handicapped and Deaf/Blind) 



Moderate Special Needs 




/ 


/ 






Curriculum & Instruction 




/ 


/ 


/ 




School Administration 




/ 


/ 


/ 


/(PSAP) 


Catholic School Leadership 




/ 


/ 






Higher Education Administration 


/ 






/ 





dissertation. The dissertation committee includes 
the major faculty advisor as Chairperson and at 
least two additional members of the Graduate 
School of Education or others qualified as Read- 
ers. 

The dissertation is defended by the candidate 
in a public oral examination. 

Official approval by the dissertation commit- 
tee is required. Committee members certify their 
acceptance by signing the title page of the disser- 
tation. Two signed copies of the dissertation, one 
original and one clear copy, should be filed in the 
office of the Associate Dean. The submitted dis- 
sertation becomes the property of Boston College 
but the University does not limit the author's 
right to publish the results. 

Doctoral candidates should report to the of- 
fice of the Associate Dean by the middle of the 
semester in which they plan to graduate for de- 
tailed instructions concerning dissertation publi- 
cation requirements and commencement proce- 
dures. Students should consult the University 
Calendar for deadlines relevant to graduation. 

Time Limit and Leave of Absence 

All requirements for the doctoral degree must be 
completed within eight consecutive years from 
the beginning of the doctoral studies. Extension 



beyond this limit may be made only with the prior 
approval of the Office of the Associate Dean. Stu- 
dents enrolled in a degree program who do not 
register for coursework, Dissertation Direction, 
Doctoral Comprehensives, or Doctoral Continu- 
ation in any given semester must request a leave 
of absence for that semester. Leaves of absence 
are usually not granted for more than two semes- 
ters at a time. Students must obtain a Leave of Ab- 
sence Fonn from the Office of the Associate Dean 
for approval. Leave time normally is not consid- 
ered a portion of the total time allotted for the 
degree completion. Students must file a 
Readmission Fonn with the Office of the Associate 
Dean and pay the readmission fee at least six 
weeks prior to the semester in which they expect 
to enroll. 

Doctor of Education Degree 

The Doctor of Education professional degree is 
granted in the Professional School Administrators 
Program (PSAP). A description of this program 
is contained under the section describing pro- 
grams in the Department of Curriculum, Admin- 
istration, and Special Education. Students receiv- 
ing the D.Ed, must complete an approved pro- 
gram of studies within eight years, demonstrate 
computer competence, meet the residency re- 
quirement, pass a comprehensive exam and com- 



plete a doctoral dissertation based on original 
research. These requirements are described in the 
preceding section on requirements for the Ph.D. 

Certificate of Advanced Educational 
Specialization (C.A.E.S.) 

A Certificate of Advanced Educational Specializa- 
tion is a terminal degree available in selected ar- 
eas of study, providing students with opportuni- 
ties to build on prior graduate work. The C.A.E.S. 
involves a planned program of study consisting of 
at least 30 credit hours beyond the Master's de- 
gree. Comprehensive examinations are required. 
Programs of study should be planned with appro- 
priate program coordinators and must be com- 
pleted within five years. 

MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Candidates for the Master's degree must be 
graduates of an accredited college or university. 
In very rare cases where there is some doubt about 
a scholastic record, acceptance may be conditional 
with the approval of the Associate Dean. Students 
admitted conditionally are evaluated by the De- 
partment and recommended to the Associate 
Dean for approval after the first semester of 
coursework or after earning a minimum of six 
credits. Students who have met their condition are 
notified of this in writing. Students who have not 



84 • Graduate School of Education • Academic Regulations 



met their condition are not matriculated into the 
program. 

Master of Education Degree (M.Ed.) 

The Master of Education is awarded in the areas 
of Early Childhood Teaching, Elementary 
Teaching, Secondary Teaching, Educational 
Research, Measurement and Evaluation, Read- 
ing/Literacy Specialization, Curriculum and In- 
struction, School Administration, and Special 
Education (Moderate Special Needs or Low In- 
cidence Special Needs). Low Incidence Special 
Needs students may further specialize in 
Educator of the Visually Handicapped or 
Multihandicapped and Deaf/Blind. Areas of spe- 
cialization are detailed in the program descrip- 
tions below. Middle School certification is pos- 
sible and primarily available to Secondary Edu- 
cation students. Students seeking this level of cer- 
tification should consult the Program Advisor for 
Secondary Education or the Assistant Dean for 
Students. 

Master of Arts in Teaching and Master 
of Science in Teaching Degrees 
(M.A.T./M.S.T.) 

The M.A.T./M.S.T. degree programs are de- 
signed for students who have graduated with a 
major or minor in liberal arts or sciences and who 
wish to prepare for teaching in the secondary 
school, for experienced teachers in secondary 
schools, and for recent college graduates already 
prepared to teach at the secondary level who want 
to earn an additional area of expertise and/or cer- 
tification. 

Students may prepare in the following disci- 
plines: Biology, Chemistry, Geology (Earth Sci- 
ence), Physics, English, Latin and Classical Hu- 
manities, History, Mathematics, French, and 
Spanish. Programs are described under the sec- 
tion on programs in Curriculum, Administration, 
and Special Education (CASE) Department. 

Master of Arts Degree (M.A) 

The Master of Arts degree is given in the areas of 
Counseling, Developmental/Educational Psy- 
chology, Early Childhood Education, and Higher 
Education Administration/Student Development. 
These programs are described in the section on 
programs in Counseling, Developmental Psy- 
chology and Research Methods (CDPRM), and 
Curriculum, Administration, and Special Educa- 
tion (CASE) Departments. 

Course Credit 

A minimum of thirty graduate credits is required 
for a Master's degree. No formal minor is re- 
quired. No more than six graduate credits of B or 
better, approved by the School, will be accepted 
in transfer toward fulfillment of course require- 
ments. A transfer of credit must be formally ap- 
plied for in the Associate Dean's office. 

Master's Comprehensive Examination 

A candidate for a Master's degree in the Gradu- 
ate School of Education must pass a comprehen- 
sive examination. The nature and content of the 
examination are determined by the program fac- 
ulty. Each candidate should consult with his or her 
major program faculty to learn the time and na- 
ture of the comprehensive examination. Registra- 
tion for comprehensives will take place with die 
individual Departments (Campion 211 or 



Campion 309). The following grading scale is 
used: Pass With Distinction (PwD), Pass (P), and 
Fail (F). Generally within two weeks, notifications 
of examination results are sent to the Registrar's 
office and the individual student. A candidate who 
fails the Master's comprehensive examination may 
take it only one more time. Students who have 
completed their coursework should register for 
Master's Interim Study (ED/PY 888.01) each se- 
mester until they complete their comprehensive 
examinations. Only the registration fee and the 
activity fee are charged during this period. No 
credit is granted. Students in the M.A.T. and 
M.S.T. programs must pass a comprehensive ex- 
amination taken in two parts — one devoted to the 
subject matter field and the other to the field of 
Education. General requirements regarding cred- 
its, time limit, and courses for the Master's pro- 
gram described above and in the Department 
within Graduate School of Arts and Sciences are 
applicable to these degrees. 

Time Limit and Leave of Absence for 
Master's Students 

A student is permitted five consecutive years from 
the date of acceptance into the program for 
completion of all requirements for the Master's 
degree. Extensions are permitted only with writ- 
ten approval of the Associate Dean. Students must 
apply for a leave of absence for a semester in which 
he/she is not registered for coursework or for 
Master's Interim Study. Leaves of absence are not 
normally granted for more than two semesters at 
a time. Students may obtain the Leave of Absence 
Form to the Office of the Associate Dean. A leave 
of absence usually does not affect the total time 
limit for the attainment of the degree. Students 
must file the Readmission Form with the Registrar's 
office and pay the re-admission fee at least six 
weeks prior to the semester in which they expect 
to re-enroll. 

Ethical Review of Research with Human 
Subjects 

Students conducting research with human sub- 
jects are encouraged to fill out the form for Ethi- 
cal Review of Human Subjects as described in the 
previous section under Doctoral Degree Programs. 

Fifth Year Programs 

Academically superior undergraduate students 
may plan their studies so as to begin graduate 
work in their senior year. This may enable the 
student to graduate with a Bachelor's degree and 
the Master's degree in five years. Fifth year pro- 
grams are available in various areas including 
Early Childhood, Elementary, or Secondary Edu- 
cation, Moderate Special Needs, Intensive Spe- 
cial Needs, Visually Handicapped Studies, Higher 
Education Administration, and Human Develop- 
ment. 

Students interested in a Fifth Year Program 
should consult with the appropriate undergradu- 
ate program coordinator and the Assistant Dean 
early in their junior year. Without proper advise- 
ment and early acceptance into a Master's degree 
program, students will be unable to complete the 
program in five years. 

A special Human Development/Social Work 
joint master's degree program is also available for 
a limited number of students. Students should 
consult the Graduate School of Social Work and 



the Coordinator of the Human Development 
program for information on requirements, pre- 
requisites and applications at the beginning of 
their sophomore year. Students interested in this 
3/2 program should apply to the Graduate School 
of Social Work at the end of their sophomore 
year. 

Student Teaching Abroad 

International student teaching opportunities are 
available for students in teacher preparation pro- 
grams in the Graduate School of Education. 
Placements are available in England, Scotland, 
Switzerland, France, Ireland, Germany Spain, and 
the Netherlands. In addition, there are placement 
opportunities on Native American Reservations 
in Maine and Arizona. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Academic Integrity 

Students in the Boston College Graduate School 
of Education are expected to have the highest 
standards of integrity. Any student who cheats or 
plagiarizes on examinations or assignments is sub- 
ject to dismissal from the Graduate School of 
Education. Cases involving departure from stan- 
dards of academic integrity, ethical professional 
conduct, or ethical research shall be referred to 
the Associate Dean for adjudication. Students are 
expected to conform with the American Psycho- 
logical Association's Ethical Principles and the 
Principles of the American Educational Research 
Association in their research and professional 
practice. Documents describing these principles 
are available in the office of the Associate Dean. 

Grades 

In each graduate course in which a student is reg- 
istered for graduate credit, the student will receive 
one of the following grades at the end of the se- 
mester: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C, F, W, J, or I. The high 
passing grade of A is awarded for superior work. 
The ordinary passing grade of B is awarded for 
work that clearly is satisfactory at the graduate 
level. The low passing grade of C is awarded for 
work that is minimally acceptable at the graduate 
level. The failing grade of F is awarded for work 
that is unsatisfactory. Academic credit is granted 
for courses in which a student receives a grade of 
A, A-, B+, B, B-, or C. No academic credit is 
granted for a course in which a student receives a 
grade of F. A student who receives a grade of C 
in two courses (six semester hours) or a grade of 
F in an elective course (three semester hours) may 
be reviewed by the Academic Standards Commit- 
tee and may be put on academic probation. A sub- 
sequent grade of C or a subsequent F in an elec- 
tive course may be grounds for dismissal from the 
School. A grade of F in a required course may be 
grounds for review by the Academic Standards 
Committee and possible dismissal from the 
Graduate School of Education. 

Courses at the graduate level that are taken on 
a Pass/Fail basis are generally not applied to a 
graduate program. Application of Pass/Fail grades 
to a graduate program requires approval of the 
Associate Dean. 

Deferred Grades 

A faculty member may assign a grade of J for 
courses that continue beyond the normal semester 



Graduate School of Education • Programs in Counseling, Developmental Psyci iolocy \\n Researq i All- ti ions • 85 



period. Such courses may include Internship, Dis- 
sertation Direction, and Student Teaching. 

Incompletes 

All required work in any course must be com- 
pleted by the date set for the course examination. 
A student who has not completed the research or 
written work for the course may, with adequate 
reason and the permission of the faculty member, 
receive an I (Incomplete). Except for extraordi- 
nary cases the grade of Incomplete shall not stand 
for more than four months. A student's financial 
aid may be jeopardized if he or she has 
Incompletes for more than four months. A grade 
of I standing for more than four months may turn 
to a grade of F. Students with graduate assistant- 
ships may not carry any incompletes. 

Withdrawal 

To withdraw from a course after registration, a 
graduate student should pick up a Course With- 
drawal form in the University Registrar's office, 
Lyons 101. The student should obtain an autho- 
rized signature from the Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School of Education. After obtaining 
the signature, the student is to return the form to 
the Registrar's office. 

For students who officially withdraw from a 
course during the registration period, no record- 
ing entry will appear on the permanent record. 
After the registration period but before the last 
three weeks of class, official withdrawal from a 
course will be recorded by W in the grade column 
of the permanent record. No student will be per- 
mitted to drop a course during the last three weeks 
of classes or during the examination period. Stu- 
dents still registered in the course during this 
period will receive a final grade for the course. For 
specific dates, please refer to the refund schedule 
of this catalog. 

Transfer of Credit 

Students who have completed one full semester 
of graduate work at Boston College may request 
a transfer of credit of not more than six graduate 
credits earned elsewhere. Only courses in which 
a student has received a grade of B or better and 
which have not been applied to a prior degree will 
be accepted. Credit received for courses com- 
pleted more than ten years prior to a student's 
admission to his or her current degree program 
are not acceptable for transfer. Transfer of credit 
forms, which are available from the University 
Registrar's office, should be submitted, together 
with an official transcript, direcdy to the student's 
Advisor and the Associate Dean for approval. If 
approved, the transfer course and credit, but not 
a grade, will be recorded on the student's perma- 
nent record. 

Graduate students who have been formally 
admitted to the Graduate School of Education 
and have earned credits in the Boston College 
Summer Session will have their grades automati- 
cally transferred to their permanent record unless 
the student requests otherwise. In order to apply 
to the program of studies, courses must be ap- 
proved by the advisor. 

Graduation 

Students should consult the University section of 
this catalog for information on graduation. 



Students must register for graduation and com- 
plete all requirements for the degree by the date 
established in the University calendar. 

Center for the Study of Testing, 
Evaluation and Educational Policy 
(CSTEEP) 

In July of 1 980, the Center for the Study of Test- 
ing, Evaluation, and Educational Policy was es- 
tablished to meet the measurement, research, and 
evaluation needs of local education agencies as 
well as those of government agencies, private 
foundations, and private corporations. The mis- 
sion of CSTEEP is to advance the study of edu- 
cational testing, evaluation, and policy so as to 
improve both the quality and the fairness of edu- 
cation. CSTEEP is presently directing the Third 
International Mathematics and Science Study 
(TIMSS) which is measuring student proficiency 
in mathematics and science at three age levels in 
over 50 countries. CSTEEP is also directing the 
Urban District Assessment Consortium (UDAC) 
project that is developing new school-based as- 
sessment methods. CSTEEP recently completed 
a study funded by the National Science Founda- 
tion on the impact of mandated testing programs 
on curriculum and instruction in elementary and 
secondary mathematics and science education, 
with a particular emphasis on the impact on teach- 
ers with large percentages of minority students. 
A report of this study, The Influence of Testing on 
Teaching Math and Science in Grades 4-12, was 
published in October of 1992. 

PROGRAMS IN COUNSELING, 
DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AND 
RESEARCH METHODS (CDPRM) 

Department Chairperson: Dr. Mary Walsh 

Details of the available graduate programs in 
this area are provided in the descriptions which 
follow and in the handbooks available in the 
CDPRM office. 

Programs in Counseling Psychology 

Programs in Counseling Psychology have as a 
mission the preparation of counselors at the 
Master's level and counseling psychologists at the 
Ph.D. level for competent professional function- 
ing in schools, universities and a variety of non- 
school health care delivery settings. The Ph.D. 
program has full accreditation from the Ameri- 
can Psychological Association. 

The primary focus of the multi-level program 
is on the facilitation of healthy functioning in cli- 
ents and a respect for individual and cultural dif- 
ferences. Competencies are developed in psycho- 
logical theories of personality and behavior, hu- 
man development, counseling strategies and ca- 
reer development. Developmental concepts are 
integrated with supervised practice through field 
placements and varied instructional approaches. 

Master of Arts in Counseling 

Coordinator: Dr. James Mahalik 

The Master of Arts degree in Counseling is a 
two-year, full-time program designed for candi- 
dates who wish to work as counselors in mental 
health agencies or in school settings. The Mental 
Health Counselor sequence is a 48 semester hour 
program, and the School Counselor sequence is 
a 36 semester hour program. The first year of 



both sequences is devoted to course work. It is 
recommended, though not required, that persons 
selecting the Mental Health Counselor sequence 
enroll in summer session classes offered by the 
program between their first and second years in 
order to complete their degree program in the 
two-year time period. The second year of the 
program includes a full-year half-time practicum/ 
internship placement and the completion of re- 
maining academic requirements. 

Prerequisites for enrollment in die Master of 
Arts program in Counseling consist of evidence 
of undergraduate preparation in personality 
theory, research methods and basic statistics, and 
developmental psychology. Students who have 
not majored in psychology will be expected to 
choose appropriate electives in their Master's 
program to fulfill these requirements. Candidates 
will select the Mental Health Counselor or School 
Counselor option prior to enrolling in the pro- 
gram. 

The School Counselor sequence is designed to 
meet the professional standards recommended by 
the Interstate Certification Compact (ICC), the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE), and the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. This sequence is de- 
signed to meet the educational requirements for 
certification in the state of Massachusetts and 
other states accepting ICC and NCATE approv- 
als. Certification is granted by the State Depart- 
ment of Education and requirements are subject 
to change by the state. 

The Mental Health Counselor sequence of study 
reflects the professional standards recommended 
by the American Counseling Association and the 
Massachusetts Board of Allied Mental Health and 
Human Services Professionals. This sequence is 
designed to meet the pre-master educational re- 
quirements for licensing as a Mental Health 
Counselor in the State of Massachusetts. Licens- 
ing is granted by the Massachusetts Board of Al- 
lied Mental Health and Human Service Profes- 
sionals and the requirements are subject to change 
by the State. 

Within the Mental Health Counselor se- 
quence, students may focus more intensively on 
children or adolescents. Similarly, in the School 
Counselor sequence, students may select the el- 
ementary/middle school track (Grades N-9) or 
the middle/high school track (Grades 5-12). The 
track must be selected early in course work since 
the student must follow prescribed curriculum 
standards. 

In their second year of the M.A. program in 
Counseling, students spend two semesters work- 
ing half-time in a field placement. The field place- 
ment usually requires two to three days per week 
during regular work hours. Students unable to 
meet this requirement should not apply to the 
program. For the Mental Health Counselor se- 
quence, students spend 700 clock hours in their 
field placement (which includes practicum and 
internship). For the School Counselor sequence, 
students spend the required prepracticum and 
practicum in field placements that must be in a 
comprehensive school system. There are no waiv- 
ers or exceptions to the above. 



86 • Gradl \te Scikx)l of Fin c \ i kin • Program in Counseling, Developmental Psychology and Research Methods 



The list of specific courses required for each 
sequence is available in the CDPRM department 
office. Deadline for application is February 1. 

Doctoral Program (Ph.D.) in Counseling 
Psychology (APA accredited) 

Director oh Training: Dr. Maureen Kenny 

The doctoral program in Counseling Psychol- 
ogy, through advanced coursework and super- 
vised internships, builds on prior graduate train- 
ing and professional experience. Using a devel- 
opmental framework and a scientist-practitioner 
model of training, the program helps students 
acquire the following competencies: ability to 
comprehend and critically analyze current litera- 
ture in the field; understanding of major theoreti- 
cal frameworks for counseling, personality and 
career development; skills to combine research 
and scientific inquiry; knowledge and practice of 
a variety of assessment techniques; respect for and 
knowledge of diverse client populations; ability to 
provide supervision, consultation and out-reach; 
and demonstrated competencies with a variety of 
individual and group counseling approaches in su- 
pervised internships. The doctoral program is 
designed to meet eligibility requirements for 
licensure as a psychologist and to develop a com- 
mitment on the part of the student to the ethical 
and legal standards of the profession including 
sensitivity to individual, gender and cultural dif- 
ferences. 

Doctoral applicants are required to have a 
Master's degree in Counseling or a closely related 
field, with a completed core program commen- 
surate to our Master's counseling sequence, in- 
cluding a minimum of 200 clock hours of super- 
vised counseling practicum. The doctoral pro- 
gram (Ph.D.) in Counseling Psychology is accred- 
ited by the American Psychological Association 
and is designed to qualify candidates for member- 
ship in that organization and Division 17 (Coun- 
seling Psychology). The program is designed to 
provide many of the professional pre-doctoral 
educational requirements for licensure as a coun- 
seling psychologist in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and for inclusion in the National 
Register of Health Care Providers. Licensure 
requirements in Massachusetts include an addi- 
tional year of post-doctoral supervised experience. 

The deadline for completed applications for 
fall admission in Counseling Psychology is Janu- 
ary 1 of that year. Admission decisions are made 
by April 15. 

The entering doctoral student who has not 
completed all of the requirements for the M.A. in 
Counseling, must complete them during the ini- 
tial year of enrollment in the doctoral program. 
Decisions regarding this aspect of the student's 
coursework will be based on a review of the 
student's background by the assigned advisor. 

( )nce admitted, doctoral students are required 
to complete courses in each of the following broad 
areas which fulfill the basic professional training 
standards: Scientific and Professional Ethics and 
Standards, Research Design and Methodology, 
Statistical Methods, Psychological Measurement, 
History and Systems of Psychology, Biological 
Bases of Behavior, Cognitive-Affective Bases of 
Behavior, Social Bases of Behavior, Individual 
Differences, Professional Specialization. 



During their first year, students should work 
with their advisors to complete a program of stud- 
ies that must be filed both with Counseling Psy- 
chology and with the Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School of Education. 

The Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology requires 
three years of full-time academic study and ad- 
vanced practica, a year of full-time internship and 
the successful defense of a dissertation. Other 
departmental requirements for the Ph.D. are dis- 
cussed earlier. The doctoral handbook is available 
in the Counseling, Developmental Psychology 
and Research Methods office. 

Programs in Developmental and 
Educational Psychology 

The theoretical orientation of the program in 
Developmental and Educational Psychology is 
life-span developmental psychology. The pro- 
grams are designed to develop expertise in theory, 
research and educational intervention with chil- 
dren, adolescents and adults. 

Three degrees are offered: The Master's de- 
gree in Developmental and Educational Psychol- 
ogy, with options in developmental and educa- 
tional psychology; early childhood specialist; and 
early childhood teacher; a C.A.E.S. in any of these 
options, and the Ph.D. in Developmental and 
Educational Psychology. 

Master's Program in Developmental 
and Educational Psychology 

Students in all master's options must take PY 414 
Learning, Learning Theory, and Development 
and PY 41 6 Child Psychology as their core within 
the Program. 

Developmental and Educational Psychology 
(M.A.) Option 

Coordinator: Dr.Jobn Dacey 

This option focuses on the unique character- 
istics, crises and developmental tasks of people at 
specific periods in their lives, including the social, 
affective, biological, and cognitive factors that 
affect development. The program is designed for 
those pursuing knowledge of theory and research 
in the area of life-span development and for those 
practitioners (counselors, nurses, personnel spe- 
cialists, teachers, social workers) seeking a greater 
understanding of the populations they serve. This 
option does not lead to licensure or certification. 
Those possessing a degree in this option are em- 
ployed in a number of developmentally oriented 
settings, e.g., residential care centers, prisons and 
correction centers, children's museums and parks, 
adult and industrial educational facilities, person- 
nel departments, governmental offices, and hos- 
pitals. Graduates also serve as educational instruc- 
tors and/or consultants in these settings. 
Required Courses: 

• PY 414 Learning, Learning Theory, and 
Development 

• PY 41 5 The Psychology of Adolescence 

• PY 416 Child Psychology 

• PY 41 7 Adult Psychology 

• ED/PY 460 Interpretation and Evaluation of 
Research 

The remaining 5 courses are electives and may 
be chosen from Education, Management, Psy- 
chology or Social Work. The program is designed 



to maintain maximum flexibility to suit individual 
needs. Students work closely with a faculty advi- 
sor to design programs that should be completed 
in the first semester of matriculation. A student 
handbook is available in the CDPRM office, 
which details the elective option. 

Early Childhood Specialist (M.A.) Option 

Coordinator: Dr. Beth Casey 

The Early Childhood Specialist option pre- 
pares students as early childhood specialists within 
a variety of fields that involve working with young 
children. The required courses are designed to 
provide a strong conceptual understanding of 
developmental issues generally, as well as a spe- 
cific concentration on young children. In addition 
students may select electives to develop their own 
particular focus. Students who are interested in 
working with children in day-care centers and 
nursery schools should select at least two meth- 
ods courses as part of their program (ED 3 1 6, 430, 
520, or 521). 

A careful combination of courses and field 
experience can prepare graduates for a variety of 
positions, such as teacher of preschool, director 
of day-care and early intervention programs, or 
member of multi-discipline teams in research, 
government and hospital settings. This program 
does not lead to certification. Those interested in 
certification should choose the Early Childhood 
Teacher option. A list of required courses is avail- 
able from the CDPRM Department office. 

Early Childhood Teacher Option 
(Certification: Pre-Kindergarten through 
Grade 3)(M.Ed) 

Coordinator: Dr.Beth Casey 

The Early Childhood Teacher option is ap- 
propriate for those students without elementary 
school certification who wish to be prepared to 
teach normal and moderately handicapped chil- 
dren in regular settings, pre-kindergarten through 
third grade. Students who wish to be prepared for 
teaching children in first through sixth grade 
should select the elementary education program. 
Students are advised that certification is granted 
by the State Department of Education and re- 
quirements are subject to change by the state. 

All students are required to complete a total 
of 38 credits. These courses include foundation 
courses, a special education course dealing with 
children with special needs, methods courses, two 
field-based prepractica, 6 credits of student teach- 
ing, and a course on family-school relations. A fist 
of required courses is available from the CDPRM 
Department office. 

For the practica, students may take their field 
placement at the preschool through third grade 
levels. At least 3 methods courses must be taken 
in conjunction with the field-based prepracticum. 

Doctoral Program (Ph.D) in 
Developmental and Educational 
Psychology 

Program Coordinator: Dr. Penny Hauser-Cram 

The doctoral program in Developmental and 
Educational Psychology educates both research- 
ers and practitioners. The program faculty are 
committed to promoting students' understanding 
of the processes involved in cognitive and affec- 
tive development. A primary focus of the program 
content is the origin and nature of diversity in 



Graduate School of Education • Programs in Curriculum, Administration, and Special Education • 87 



gender, race, ethnicity and physical and mental 
challenges. Individual development is examined 
in relation to social factors and the interaction of 
biological and environmental factors. Educational 
and human service applications are emphasized, 
and work with diverse populations in underserved 
communities is a major focus. The faculty bring 
four areas of specialization to these central 
themes: (1) early childhood with a focus on the 
development of social competency and critical 
thinking skills, (2) cognitive psychology, with a 
focus on learning styles, creativity, and 
neuropsychological applications, (3) ethical deci- 
sion making and values and character formation, 
and (4) the social context of development, focus- 
ing on the interdependence of individuals, peers, 
family, community, and culture. The range of 
careers available to Developmental and Educa- 
tional Psychology graduates with a Ph.D. includes 
university teaching, research, consultation and 
positions in business, governmental agencies, and 
human service organizations. 

The curriculum requires that students take 
courses in development across the life span. In 
addition students develop expertise in the follow- 
ing areas: social, affective and cognitive develop- 
ment, individual differences, cognition and learn- 
ing, cultural context of development, research 
methods, and statistics. 

Courses that satisfy these requirements are 
listed in the doctoral handbook for Developmen- 
tal and Educational Psychology available in the 
Counseling, Developmental Psychology and Re- 
search Methods office. 

Programs in Educational Research, 
Measurement and Evaluation 

Coordinator: Dr. Peter W. Airasian 

Programs in Educational Research, Measure- 
ment and Evaluation are housed in the Depart- 
ment of Counseling, Developmental Psychology 
and Research Methods. 

The program in Educational Research, Mea- 
surement and Evaluation is designed to prepare 
researchers with specialized competence in test- 
ing, assessment, the evaluation of educational 
programs and in basic quantitative research meth- 
odology for the social sciences and human ser- 
vices. Graduates of the program are qualified for 
academic positions in university departments of 
education and social sciences. They are also quali- 
fied for research positions in universities, foun- 
dations, local education agencies, state and re- 
gional educational organizations, and in research 
and development centers. 

Master of Education in Education and 
Research Measurement and Evaluation 

Program Advisor: Dr. Peter W. Airasian 

A minimum of 30 semester hours and satis- 
factory performance on a comprehensive exami- 
nation are required for the M.Ed, degree. 

Requirements: 

• PY/ED 460 Interpretation and Evaluation of 
Research 

• PY/ED 468 Statistics I 

• PY/ED 469 Intermediate Statistics 

• At least three of the following should be taken: 
ED 462 Construction of Achievement Tests 
ED 466 Models of Curriculum and Program 



Evaluation 

ED 467 Practical Aspects of Curriculum and 

Program Evaluation 

ED/PY 565 Quantitative Data Collection 

Procedures 

ED/PY 851 Quantitative Research 

Methodologies 

• The M.Ed, student will also generally take at 
least one course in Developmental and Educa- 
tional Psychology and one in Philosophy or His- 
tory of Education. 

Ph.D. in Educational Research, 
Measurement and Evaluation 

Coordinator: Dr. Peter W. Airasian 

This program prepares researchers with spe- 
cialized competence in testing, assessment, the 
evaluation of educational innovations and in ba- 
sic quantitative social science research methodol- 
ogy. A minimum of 54 credits beyond the M.Ed, 
is required. Emphasis is on the application of re- 
search design and statistical methods in making 
measurements and drawing inferences about edu- 
cational and social science problems, with special 
attention given to methods of testing, assessment, 
data collection and analysis of data. Training and 
experience are provided in the use of computers 
in statistical analysis. Since the important issues 
in these areas require more than technical solu- 
tions, the program also attends to non-technical 
social, ethical, and legal issues. Knowledge of a 
computer language is required of all students. 

Students are expected to develop a basic un- 
derstanding of modern techniques of test con- 
struction and evaluation, design of research and 
experiments, univariate and multivariate statisti- 
cal analysis of data, and psychometric theory. 

Care is taken to design programs of study and 
experience according to the individual student's 
needs, interests and goals. 

Students may have a minor in Developmen- 
tal and Educational Psychology, Special Educa- 
tion, Computer Science and Management, Edu- 
cational Administration, or other areas. 

Requirements 

In addition to the courses required for the M.Ed, 
in Educational Research, Measurement and 
Evaluation, the following core courses will usu- 
ally be included in each program: 

• PY/ED 664 Design of Experiments 

• PY/ED 667 Introduction to Multivariate 
Statistical Analysis 

• PY/ED 668 Topics in Multivariate Statistical 
Analysis 

• PY/ED 669 Psychometric Theory 

• PY/ED 829 Design of Research 

• PY/ED 851 Qualitative Research 
Methodologies 

• PY/ED 860 Survey Methods in Social and 
Educational Research 

• PY/ED 861 Construction of Attitude and 
Opinion Questionnaires 

• ED 960 Seminar in Educational Research, 
Testing, and Measurement 



PROGRAMS IN CURRICULUM, 
ADMINISTRATION, AND SPECIAL 
EDUCATION (CASE) 

Department Chairperson: Dr. John F. Savage 

Programs in Curriculum, Administration, and 
Special Education (CASE) prepare educational 
leaders for instructional and administrative roles 
in public and private schools, in institutions of 
higher education, and in related organizations. 
The intent is to provide a blend of scholarship, 
disciplined inquiry and professional experiences 
that will develop the sound understanding, prac- 
tical skills, ethical values and social responsibili- 
ties that are required of competent educators. 

Student programs are individualized under 
the guidance of an advisor, with special consid- 
eration given to each student's career goals and 
any certification requirements that might exist for 
the position for which the student is preparing. 
Details of the available graduate programs in this 
area are provided in the descriptions that follow. 

Areas of Concentration 

Programs and courses in CASE are designed to 
prepare educators in the area of elementary and 
secondary teaching, including special education, 
and in the area of school and higher education ad- 
ministration. 

Teacher preparation programs are designed 
for individuals interested in working in elemen- 
tary and secondary schools both public and pri- 
vate. Boston College has earned a distinguished 
reputation for preparing outstanding classroom 
teachers and special educators in theoretical and 
practical dimensions of instruction. 

Programs in Educational Administration pre- 
pare students for leadership positions in school 
systems, and programs in Higher Education pre- 
pare students to assume administrative roles in 
post-secondary institutions. The Catholic School 
Leadership Program offers special opportunities 
for administrators who desire to further their 
spiritual and professional growth. 

Certification 

Boston College offers programs designed to pre- 
pare students for certification at the Master's, 
C.A.E.S., and Doctoral levels. A student seeking 
certification must be admitted as a degree candi- 
date. Programs are approved by the Interstate 
Certification Compact (ICC) and the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Educa- 
tion (NCATE), allowing students easier access to 
certification outside Massachusetts. 

Teacher preparation programs lead to Mas- 
sachusetts provisional certification with advanced 
standing and standard certification. Certification 
regulations are set by the state and are subject to 
change. Students should carefully plan programs 
in consultation with the appropriate program 
advisor to ensure that degree requirements and 
certification requirements are both fulfilled. 

Students who plan to seek certification in 
states other than Massachusetts should check the 
certification requirements in those states. 

Following is a list of certification areas and the 
Program Advisor for each. 

Early Childhood: Dr. Beth Casey 

Elementary Teaching: Dr. Michael Schiro 

Middle School: Sr. Maryalyce Gilfeather 



88 • Graduatf School of Education • Programs in Curriculum, Administration and Special Education 



Secondary Teaching: Dr. Kilburn Culley 
Teacher of Students with Special Needs: 
Dr. Alec Peck 

Teacher ot Students with Low Incidence 
Handicaps: Dr. Richard Jackson 

Consulting Teacher of Reading: 

Dr. John F. Savage 

Supervisor/Director: Dr. Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

School Principal: Dr. Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

Field Experiences 

Field experiences are an essential part of the cur- 
riculum in certification programs and should be 
planned with the respective program coordinator 
early in the student's program. All field experi- 
ences are arranged through the Professional 
Practicum Experiences Office, and applications 
for all placements must be made during the se- 
mester preceding the one in which it is to occur. 
Applicadon deadlines for full practica are Octo- 
ber 30 for spring assignments and March 15 for 
fall assignments. Application deadlines for pre- 
practica will be posted outside the Office of Pro- 
fessional Practicum Experiences in April for fall 
pre-practica and in November for Spring pre- 
practica. 

The following are prerequisites for students 
who are applying for practica and clinical experi- 
ences. 

• A Grade Point Average of "B" or better, (3 .0 or 
above). 

• Completion of required pre-practica or waiver 
from the Director of the Practicum Office. 

• Completion of 75% of the coursework related 
to CORE Education courses. 

• Registration in the Office of Professional 
Practicum Experiences. 

Field experiences for certification combine a 
provisional practicum and a clinical experience. 
The provisional practicum is ordinarily not taken 
alone. Facilities used by the Practicum Office for 
field experiences are located in Boston and neigh- 
boring areas. Students are responsible for provid- 
ing their own transportation to and from these fa- 
cilities. In addition to the local field sites, a lim- 
ited number of placements in teaching are avail- 
able in out-of-state and international settings, 
including Arizona and Maine (Indian reserva- 
tions), Great Britain, Ireland, Switzerland, Spain, 
Germany, and France. 

The Office of Professional Practicum Expe- 
riences arranges field placements only for students 
enrolled in good academic standing in teacher 
certification degree programs. 

Master's Degree Programs 

The Master of Education degree (M.Ed.) is of- 
fered with six areas of specialization: curriculum 
and instruction, elementary teaching, secondary 
teaching, special education, school administration 
and supervision, reading instruction, and Catho- 
lic School Leadership. The Master of Arts in 
Teaching (M.A.T.) and Master of Science in 
Teaching (M.S.T.) degrees are offered with spe- 
cialties in secondary education. The Master of 
Arts degree (M.A.) is offered in the area of higher 
education, with concentrations in either admin- 
istration or student development. The following 
is a description of each degree program. Further 
program information can be acquired by contact- 
ing the program advisors. 



Curriculum and Instruction 

Program Advisor: Dr. Michael Schiro 

The Master's degree program in Curriculum 
and Instruction consists of a planned program 
with a minimum of 30 graduate credit hours. Two 
basic courses are required: 

• ED 42 1 Instructional Theory 

• ED 436 Curriculum Theories and Practice (for 
beginning students) or ED 720 Curriculum 
Theory and Philosophy (for advanced students) 

The remaining courses are planned in consul- 
tation with the advisor to meet each candidate's 
career goals and needs. Programs usually consist 
of course work and related experiences in issues 
in curriculum and instruction, program evalua- 
tion, and areas of academic specialization. Can- 
didates have considerable flexibility in combining 
areas of study. 

This degree program does not lead to certifi- 
cation. 

Elementary Teaching 

Program Advisor: Dr. Michael Schiro 

The Elementary Teaching program is de- 
signed for students who wish to teach in grades 
one through six. The program stresses a human- 
istic approach to teaching that is both develop- 
mentally appropriate and intellectually challeng- 
ing. It prepares the teacher to work with the di- 
verse range of children found within any class- 
room by providing the teacher with knowledge 
about instructional practices, along with philo- 
sophical and psychological perspectives on chil- 
dren. 

The prerequisite for the program is a 
bachelor's degree with a liberal arts and sciences 
or interdisciplinary major or the equivalent. The 
course of study for the program includes founda- 
tions and professional courses, and field experi- 
ences that are carefully planned with the program 
advisor to ensure that both degree requirements 
and certification requirements are fulfilled. 

Secondary Teaching 

Program Advisor: Dr. Kilburn Culley 

Students in secondary education can pursue 
either a Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree, a 
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) or a Master 
of Science in Teaching (M.S.T). The choice of 
degree program is often determined by the 
amount of undergraduate coursework in the sub- 
ject area that he or she plans to teach. 

The M.Ed, program is designed for students 
who have completed a full undergraduate major 
in the subject they wish to teach. When students 
have completed an undergraduate major or 36 
hours in the discipline, they are able to pursue a 
full graduate program in Education and build a 
stronger pedagogical base. The M.Ed, program 
involves a planned 33 credit-hour course of study 
consisting of eight courses (not more than two of 
which are outside Education), two prepracticum 
field experiences, a full semester practicum and 
seminar. 

The M.A.T./M.ST. program usually consists 
of a balance of five graduate courses in a subject 
area and five graduate courses in Education, plus 
two prepractica and a full semester practicum and 
seminar. Students select courses in the discipline 
with an eye to certification requirements and ar- 
eas of interest. Courses of study are carefully 
planned with a program advisor. 



Special Education 

The mission and purpose of programs in Special 
Education are the preparation of outstanding pro- 
fessionals to work with, or on behalf of, individu- 
als with disabilities. Because programs in Special 
Education have been developed in conjunction 
with course offerings, students complete course 
work that addresses professional standards com- 
mon to all teachers. Boston College is commit- 
ted to serve the larger community, and Special 
Education faculty maintain a close working rela- 
tionship with school programs and institutions 
that serve the needs of learners with disabilities 
including public and private schools in the 
Greater Boston area, Perkins School for the Blind, 
Boston Children's Hospital, the Carroll Center 
for the Blind, Franciscan Children's Hospital, 
Boston College Campus School for 
Multihandicapped Students, and other agencies 
beyond the Greater Boston area. 

The department offers two programs in Spe- 
cial Education, each containing distinct but re- 
lated areas of emphasis. The Teacher of Students 
with Special Needs Program prepares specialists 
to provide direct and indirect services to children 
within regular classrooms, resource rooms, and 
substantially separate classes. The Low Incidence 
Disabilities Program prepares professionals to 
work with infants, toddlers, children, and youth 
who are severely challenged in areas of sensation, 
communication, cognition, mobility and/or be- 
havior. 

Teacher of Students with Special Needs 
(Learning Disabilities, Mild Retardation and 
Behavior Disorders) 

Program Advisor: Dr. Alec Peck 

The population served by Teachers of Stu- 
dents with Special Needs is classified in some 
states as learning disabled, mildly retarded or 
behaviorally handicapped. This program, how- 
ever, is based on a non-categorical model focused 
on educational need rather than category of 
handicapping condition. No previous teaching 
experience is required. Students select an Elemen- 
tary or Secondary focus. Financial aid is some- 
times available in the form of paid pre-practicum 
and practicum experiences in local school systems 
as well as various programs administered through 
the Financial Aid Office. Entry into the program 
may be at one of three levels: 

Level I: Students with no previous back- 
ground in education select a sequence of courses 
leading to certification in Early Childhood, El- 
ementary, or Secondary Education prior to com- 
pleting requirements for certification in Special 
Education. 

Level II: Students already certified in Early 
Childhood, Elementary, or Secondary Education 
complete the requirements for certification in 
Moderate Special Needs (30-39 credits, depend- 
ing on prior course work). 

Level HI: Students already certified in El- 
ementary or Secondary and Moderate Special 
Needs complete a program planned according to 
the student's experience and career goals (30 to 
36 credits). 

Programs of study are planned on an indi- 
vidual basis taking into consideration the student's 
prior course work and field experiences. Since 
many states already require a regular education 



Graduate School of Education • Programs in Curriculum, Administration and Special Education • 89 



certificate as a prerequisite for certification in any 
area of special education, this can be an attractive 
option. The Moderate Special Needs program 
offers the M.Ed, degree and/or the Certificate of 
Advanced Educational Specialization. A list of 
required courses is available from the program 
advisor. 

Teacher of Students with Low Incidence 
Disabilities (Intensive Special Needs, Visual 
Impairments, and Deaf-Blind/ Multiple 
Disabilities) 

Program Advisor: Dr. Richard Jackson 

Boston College prepares teachers to provide 
direct and consultative services to individuals, 
families, school personnel and social service agen- 
cies across a wide array of educational options. 
Three program areas of emphasis are offered 
within the Low Incidence Disabilities Program: 
Educator of Students with Visual Impairments, 
Educator of Students with Severe/Intensive Spe- 
cial Needs, and Educator of Students who are 
Deaf-Blind or Multiply Disabled. The first two 
program options lead to the Master of Education 
degree and are designed to prepare students for 
Massachusetts Certification as a Teacher of Stu- 
dents with Visual Impairments and Teacher of 
Students with Intensive Special Needs respec- 
tively. The third program option may lead to ei- 
ther the M.Ed, or the C.A.E.S. as it is designed 
to build upon the offerings in both the vision area 
and the severe/intensive area. This option also is 
designed to prepare students for Massachusetts 
Certification as a Teacher of Students with Inten- 
sive Special Needs. 

Educator of Students with Visual 
Impairments 

Program Advisor: Dr. Richard Jackson 

This 36 credit Master of Education degree 
program prepares teacher/consultants to work 
with, or on behalf of, blind or visually impaired 
children with unique visual needs. Graduates of 
the program function primarily as itinerant 
teacher/consultants. They are hired by urban, 
suburban and rural school districts, state depart- 
ments of education, and private agency outreach 
programs. These professionals provide support 
for the inclusion of children with visual impair- 
ments in regular classrooms or other special edu- 
cational settings. In some instances, direct instruc- 
tion in Braille and/or use of adaptive technology 
is required. At other times, pre-teaching of in- 
structional units to be covered in the regular class- 
room is necessary. Many times, co-teaching with 
regular education personnel is employed to dem- 
onstrate teaching techniques and instructional 
strategies that maximize the benefits of time spent 
with non-disabled peers. 

The program, which consists of specialty 
course work, advanced graduate course work, and 
multiple field experiences can be pursued on a 
full-time or part-time basis. Persons interested in 
pursuing this program of study should contact die 
program advisor for additional information re- 
lated to the requirements and/or financial assis- 
tance. 



Teacher of Students with Intensive Special 
Needs 

Program Advisor: Dr. Nancy Zollers 

This program leads to a Master's degree in 
Special Education and prepares students to work 
with a spectrum of severely disabled students from 
pre-school through older adolescence in a vari- 
ety of educational settings. 

Both formal course work and multiple field ex- 
periences are included in the program. Through 
advisement, opportunities for hands-on experi- 
ences are made available in the Boston public and 
private schools and in the Boston College Cam- 
pus School for Multihandicapped Students, with 
emphasis on exemplary inclusive settings using 
best practice. 

Students may be enrolled on a full- or part- 
time basis. For those students employed in ap- 
proved Intensive Special Needs programs, 
practicum requirements may be completed within 
the work setting. The program of study expands 
on and builds upon a prerequisite education foun- 
dation through the development of competencies 
that are research and field-based and consistent 
with professional standards of the field. 

Educator of Students with Deaf-Blindness 
and Multiple Disabilities 

Program Advisor: Dr. Barbara McLetchie 

Boston College has a long history of prepar- 
ing specialists to work with infants, children, and 
youth who have multiple disabilities, including 
deaf-blindness. Graduates of this program are 
serving individuals with deaf-blindness in a vari- 
ety of roles throughout the United States and 
other countries. The Deaf-Blind and Multiple 
Disabilities specialty leads to an M.Ed, degree or 
a C.A.E.S. Practical experiences working with 
learners with multiple disabilities and deaf-blind- 
ness are important components of this specialty. 
Students may choose a particular focus (e.g., in- 
fant stimulation, adolescence, pre-vocational, 
young children, etc.). Most students enter the 
specialty at one of two levels: 

Level I: Students with no previous prepara- 
tion in special education must complete a program 
of study to complete the requirements for certi- 
fication as a Teacher of Students with Intensive 
Special Needs. 

Level II: Students with undergraduate majors 
and certification in Intensive Special Needs can 
complete a 37-credit hour sequence for the M.Ed, 
degree. 

Additionally, students with undergraduate 
study in some area of special education may en- 
ter this specialty. Course work and credits lead- 
ing to an M.Ed, depend upon an evaluation of 
previous course work and experience. Many stu- 
dents also choose to pursue course work designed 
to lead to certification as an Educator of Students 
with Vision Impairments. Adjustments in course 
selection and sequence will be based upon an 
evaluation of each student's previous preparation 
and experience. A list of required courses is avail- 
able from the program advisor. 

Educational Administration 

Program Advisor: Dr. Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

Recognizing the need for dynamic educational 
leadership in dramatically changing times, Bos- 
ton College offers graduate programs in 



Educational Administration leading to certifica- 
tion as an assistant principal, principal, supervi- 
sor/director, administrator of special education, 
assistant superintendent, and superintendent. 
Certification in some of these areas may require 
study beyond the Master's degree level. Admis- 
sion to all programs requires a minimum of three 
years of employment in a school-based or alter- 
native instructional setting. 

All programs of study in Educational Admin- 
istration consist of core courses related to educa- 
tional leadership and management, specific 
courses related to the particular certificate sought, 
and a practicum related to career objectives. 
Given changing certification requirements, stu- 
dents should carefully plan programs in consul- 
tation with program advisors to see that degree 
requirements and certification requirements are 
met. 

Catholic School Leadership 
Specialization 

Program Advisor: Sr. Dale MacDonald 

The Catholic School Leadership Program 
(CSLP) has been designed in response to an ex- 
pressed need to assist Catholic school educators 
in their unique role of bringing new vision to 
Catholic schools. The program focuses on futur- 
istic planning grounded in the practical aspects of 
administration and enlivened by the hope of the 
Christian message. Courses in the CSLP are of- 
fered during summer session, along with academic 
year courses in the fall and spring semesters. 

Practicing or prospective administrators and 
interested teachers, lay or religious, may obtain a 
Master's Degree in Education (30 credits) or a 
Certificate of Advanced Educational Study. This 
program does not lead to state certification. 

Selected courses offered through the Theol- 
ogy Department, the Institute of Religious Edu- 
cation and Pastoral Ministry and the Graduate 
School of Management may be taken with the 
approval of the advisor. 

Graduate Reading Program 

Program Advisor: Dr. John F. Savage 

The Graduate Reading Program consists of a 
series of courses and related practicum experi- 
ences designed to help classroom teachers and 
resource room specialists increase knowledge and 
skill as teachers of literacy. The program is de- 
signed to enable candidates to meet Massachusetts 
certification standards for Consulting Teacher of 
Reading. The program is also approved by the 
ICC and NCATE, and it conforms to the guide- 
lines of the International Reading Association. 

The program of study consists of foundation 
courses, courses in language and literacy, and field 
experiences as a consulting teacher of reading. A 
classroom teaching certificate and one year of full- 
time teaching are required for admission into the 
program and for certification as a Consulting 
Teacher of Reading. Given changes in the 
certification requirements, students should care- 
fully plan programs in consultation with the pro- 
gram advisor to see that degree and certification 
requirements are met. 



90 



Graduate School of Education • Programs in Curriculum, Administration and Special Education' 



Higher Education Specializations: 
Administration and Student 
Development 

Program Advisors: Dr. Karen Arnold and Dr. Ted 
I.K. Youn 

A minimum of 30 semester hours of course 
work is required for the MA. degree. These de- 
gree requirements may ordinarily be completed 
in 2 semesters and a summer of full-time study. 

The purpose of the M.A. program is to pro- 
vide preparation in Higher Education for middle 
managers to be employed in the offices of college 
and university administrators: the president, vice- 
president, and deans of academic and student af- 
fairs and in policy making organizations; the reg- 
istrar, admissions, and financial aid; student de- 
velopment and residence life, alumni, and public 
relations. The curriculum is designed to give the 
student professional preparation for positions in 
community and junior colleges, universities, tech- 
nical institutes, and other post-secondary institu- 
tions. 
Required Courses: 

• ED/PY 460 Interpretation and Evaluation of 
Research 

• ED 770 History and Theory of Higher 
Education 

• ED 771 Organization and Administration of 
Higher Education 

• ED 772 Student Affairs Administrator 

• PY 778 Theories in Student Personnel/ 
Development 

• ED 975, Internship in Higher Education, is 
required for students who have had no experience 
in institutions of higher learning or who wish to 
explore alternative areas of specialization in 
higher education administration or student affairs. 
Candidates see their faculty advisors for place- 
ments. 

Electives are chosen from related areas, by 
advisement. Programs are arranged on an indi- 
vidual basis by the program advisor. Care is taken 
to design programs of study and experience ac- 
cording to the individual student's needs, inter- 
ests and goals. 

Certificate of Advanced Educational 
Specialization Programs 

The C.A.E.S. is designed for currently practicing 
educators who already have a Master's degree and 
who do not plan to pursue a doctoral degree but 
seek a higher level of specialization or professional 
certification in a particular field. Following are the 
general areas of specialization and their respec- 
tive advisors: 

• School Administration and Supervision 
Advisor: Dr. Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

• Curriculum and Instruction 
Advisor: Dr. Michael Schiro 

• Catholic School Leadership 
Advisor: Sr. Dale MacDonald 

Doctoral Programs 

The doctoral program in Curriculum, Adminis- 
tration and Special Education is designed for 
people seeking leadership roles within a variety 
of educational settings. The program offers can- 
didates flexibility in selection of courses while 
providing them with the opportunity to develop 
strong leadership skills. 



The program offers three major areas of spe- 
cialization: Educational Administration, Curricu- 
lum/ Instruction, and Higher Education Admin- 
istration. 

Doctoral programs contain four components: 
a core of basic required courses, an area of spe- 
cialization, a practicum or internship, and a dis- 
sertation. Requirements for each component are 
described below. 

Core 

The core covers three areas: Schooling, Human 
Resources Management, and Research/Evalua- 
tion. Because programs of study are individually 
planned according to each candidate's back- 
ground and goals, specific courses within these 
areas differ from program to program. Courses 
are selected in consultation with advisors. (See the 
course descriptions that follow.) 

The purpose of the Schooling Core is to assist 
doctoral students in learning how to articulate and 
effectively act upon curriculum and instruction 
issues, evaluate curriculum and instruction prac- 
tices, implement planned organizational and in- 
structional change, obtain financial and organi- 
zational support, and help others develop inno- 
vative ideas, practices and materials. Candidates 
take four courses in the Schooling Core: one in 
each of the following areas: Curriculum Theory 
(ED 720 or 873); Theories of Instruction (ED 421 
or 773); Educational Change (ED 819 or ED 729); 
and Program Evaluation (ED 466, 467 or 561). 

The purpose of the Human Resources Manage- 
ment Core is to help students understand and 
manage human behavior. This includes enabling 
students to obtain an understanding of adminis- 
trative and supervisory roles, the ability to work 
in all aspects of student affairs, skills in supervis- 
ing personnel, and an understanding of the legal, 
ethical and political ramifications of both orga- 
nizational behavior and one's own behavior within 
an organization. In Human Resources Manage- 
ment, candidates take a total of four courses, one 
in each of the following areas: Administration 
(ED 450, 755, 771, or 871); Personnel/ Supervision 
(ED 451, 459, 523, or 953); Policy/Law/Ethics/or 
Politics (ED 456, 458, 878 or 956); and Human 
Development/Student Affairs (PY 440, ED 653, 
ED 772, PY 778, ED 872, or a psychology 
course). Specific course selection depends on each 
candidate's professional background and needs. 

The purpose of the Research Core is to provide 
candidates with the basic research skills needed 
to write a dissertation. In the area of Research Skills 
(statistical, historical, qualitative), the departmen- 
tal requirements must be fulfilled. This includes 
Statistics I and Intermediate Statistics (PY/ED 
468 and 469), one course in Research Design (PY/ 
ED 829), and two courses in dissertation prepa- 
ration (customarily PY/ED 951 Dissertation 
Seminar and PY/ED 988 Dissertation Direction). 

Specializations 

Candidates will be expected to develop an exper- 
tise in the area in which they intend to assume 
leadership responsibility. Acquisition of this ex- 
pertise shall include at least six additional courses 
in the area of specialization, to be arranged be- 
tween the candidate and his or her advisor, de- 
pending upon the candidate's background and 
career goals. The three broad areas of specializa- 



tion that are addressed by the doctoral program 
are described below. 

Educational Administration 

Admissions Advisor: Dr Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

This specialty is for students who aspire to 
leadership roles in educational administration and 
supervision. Specialization is offered in the areas 
of Supervisor/Director, Principalship, and Super- 
intendency. Specializations also prepare students 
to work in administration and supervision posi- 
tions in related areas such as business, govern- 
ment, social agencies and other educational agen- 
cies. 

Professional School Administrator Program 
(PSAP) 

Program Advisor: Dr. Philip DiMattia 

The Professional School Administrator Pro- 
gram is a specifically designed doctoral program 
that leads to the Doctor of Education degree. 
Experienced school administrators selected for 
this program meet together during the summer 
session and academic year over a three-year pe- 
riod and spend additional time on campus for 
their research and individual conferences. 

Higher Education Administration 

Admissions Advisors: Dr. Karen Arnold and Dr. 
Ted I. K Youn 

This specialty is for people who currently fill, 
or who plan to assume, administrative or student 
affairs positions in institutions of higher learning. 
This program includes the development of a 
sound theoretical and conceptual basis for under- 
standing the governance of colleges and univer- 
sities. This is achieved by analysis of practical 
problems, leading to the studies in policy devel- 
opment and implementation. Preparation for a 
wide range of administrative positions is offered, 
such as offices of student personnel/student de- 
velopment, (presidents, vice presidents, and deans 
of academic and student affairs) and positions in 
public administration, (registrar, admissions, and 
financial aid, student development and residence 
life, development, alumni and public relations 
officers). 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Admissions Advisor: Dr. Michael Schiro 

This specialty is for people who currently fill, 
or who plan to assume, instructional leadership 
roles in schools, school systems, colleges, univer- 
sities, or other related instructional environments. 
Courses and related program experiences are 
planned to develop competencies necessary in the 
design, implementation, and evaluation of cur- 
riculum. There is a complementary emphasis on 
designing strategies for effective instruction. Stu- 
dents who are interested in working in schools or 
school systems can pursue programs that involve 
developing expertise in several areas of instruc- 
tion, such as reading, literacy, mathematics, com- 
puters and technology, and science, or combina- 
tions thereof. Students who desire to teach at the 
college or post-secondary levels can pursue spe- 
cialties such as curriculum development, teacher 
education in a subject matter area, and teacher 
development and supervision. Students who are 
interested in working in schools or school systems 
can pursue programs that involve developing ex- 
pertise in several areas of instruction such as read- 
ing, mathematics, special education, computers 



Graduate School or Education • Course Offerings • 91 



and technology, and science, or combinations 
thereof. 

Practicum/lnternship 

The Practicum/lnternship is designed for those 
students who need on-site educational experi- 
ences in an area directly related to their special- 
ization. Candidates expecting to receive certifica- 
tion or to enter a job different from the one they 
have been currently performing should complete 
a practicum/internship. The practicum/intern- 
ship will involve working in a leadership role in 
an educational setting similar to the one the can- 
didate wishes to enter. With approval, candidates 
who have been or who are currendy employed in 
a job they want to continue can complete the in- 
ternship within that setting. All candidates (espe- 
cially those seeking certification) must plan care- 
fully with their advisors to insure that the neces- 
sary prerequisites leading to the practicum are 
completed. Students are advised that certification 
requirements are subject to change by the State. 

Course Numbers and Meeting Times 

All courses in the three hundred sequence (300- 
399) are open to both Master's students and ad- 
vanced undergraduates. Courses in the three hun- 
dred sequence cannot usually be used toward the 
C.A.E.S. or doctorate. Courses at the 400-600 
level are usually considered master's or introduc- 
tory doctoral level. Courses at the 700-900 level 
are doctoral courses. Courses carry either a PY, 
ED, or ED/PY prefix. Courses that are listed PY 
are Psychology courses in Education. Courses 
that are listed as ED are Education courses. 
Courses listed ED/PY may be taken as either 
Psychology in Education or Education courses. 
Unless otherwise indicated, courses listed in 
this section are offered in the 1994-95 academic 
year. Every attempt has been made to indicate 
when courses that are not offered annually will be 
offered next. With some exceptions, graduate 
courses meet in the evening, either 4:30 to 6:15 
or 6:30 to 8:15. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

ED 300 Secondary Science Methods (F: 3) 

The course will provide an active, instructional 
environment that will enable each student to con- 
struct knowledge (skill, affective, and cognitive) 
that, in turn, will allow them to be prepared to 
construct instructional environments meeting the 
needs of tomorrow's secondary and middle school 
students. Work will include reflection on current 
research: reform movements from AAAS and 
NSTA; inclusionary practices; interactions with 
experienced teachers; first hand experience with 
instructional technology; and review and devel- 
opment of curriculum and related instructional 
materials. George Ladd 

ED 301 Secondary History Methods (F: 3) 

This course will demonstrate methods for orga- 
nizing instruction, using original sources, devel- 
oping critical thinking, facilitating inquiry learn- 
ing, integrating social studies and evaluation. 
Students will be required to develop and present 
sample lessons and units for middle and second- 
ary school learners. Substantial field work 
required. The Department 



ED 302 Secondary and Middle School English 
Methods (F: 3) 

This course covers topics and concerns for the 
teaching of English at the middle and secondary 
school levels. Curriculum building, unit and les- 
son plan construction, and the teaching of litera- 
ture, writing, speaking and listening skills are 
among the topics covered. Edward Smith 

ED 303 Secondary Language Methods (F: 3) 

This is a review of recent research in second-lan- 
guage acquisition and its application to the sec- 
ondary school classroom. Emphasis is placed on 
techniques for developing and evaluating profi- 
ciency in listening, speaking, reading, and writ- 
ing. Students will analyze available audio-visual 
materials (overhead transparencies, tapes, films 
and computer software) and learn how to inte- 
grate these ancillaries into their lesson plans. 

Rebecca Valette 

ED 304 Secondary Math Methods (F: 3) 

This course is designed to prepare the student for 
teaching in the middle and secondary school. It 
includes topics such as classroom practices, les- 
son planning, classroom management and assess- 
ment of student performance. The responsibility 
of the student teacher to the cooperating teacher 
is covered and mathematical topics are developed. 
Presentation of units in mathematics is required 
as is substantial field work. The Department 

ED 307 Teachers and Educational Reform (S: 3) 

This course will examine the literature on the re- 
form of education, paying particular attention to 
the role of teachers in the reform literature and 
the implications of reform for teaching. It will ex- 
amine the role of teachers in restructuring, 
school-based management, assessment, account- 
ability, and delivery of instruction. 

George Madaus 

PY 314 Psychology of Self -Control (F: 3) 

An analysis of the philosophical, psychological, 
and sociological aspects of how we control our- 
selves. What does it mean to say I control me? 
How does self-control change with age? Implica- 
tions for education and psychology will be cov- 
ered. 

John Dacey 

ED 374 Management of the Behavior of 
Students with Severe Special Needs (F: 3) 

The focus of this course is on the principles and 
practices of applied behavior analysis as they re- 
late to the education of students with severe spe- 
cial needs. Students will be exposed to classical 
and operant conditioning; principles of reinforce- 
ment; management programs for increasing and 
decreasing the reinforcement and frequency of 
behaviors; schedules of reinforcement; and ethi- 
cal and responsible use of applied behavior analy- 
sis procedures. Heavy emphasis is placed on the 
practice of systematic data collection and its on- 
going use in classrooms. Use of a word processor 
and graphing of behavioral data on a computer is 
required as part of the final project. Prepracticum 
required (25 hours.) Alec Peck 



ED 380 Functional Implications of Vision 
Pathology (F: 3) 

This course examines the educational implica- 
tions of visual dysfunction. Structure and function 
of the visual system including the neural pathw ays 
are examined as a basis for understanding the limi- 
tations imposed on the individual by specific vi- 
sual disorders. The course prepares students to in- 
terpret ophthalmic, optometric, and clinical low 
vision evaluation reports. Students are also pre- 
pared to design and carry out functional low vi- 
sion assessment protocols. An overview of systems 
for vision stimulation, sight utilization and visual 
skills training is included. This course contains a 
prepracticum requirement in functional vision 
assessment. Prepracticum required (25 hours.) 

Richard Jackson 

ED 384 Teaching Strategies for Students with 
Multiple Disabilities (S: 3) 

This course is designed to assist the special edu- 
cator in acquiring and developing both the back- 
ground knowledge and practical skills involved in 
teaching individuals who have multiple disabili- 
ties, including deaf-blindness. The areas of gross 
motor, fine motor, self-care, functional and age- 
appropriate programming are emphasized. The 
medial management of individuals with disabili- 
ties and the role of the educator in the 
transdisciplinary team are included. Students 
should be prepared to participate in a one-day- 
per-week field placement. Practicum required (25 
hours.) Nancy Zollers 

ED 386 Introduction to Sign Language and 
Deafness (F, S: 3) 

A course in the techniques of manual communi- 
cation with an exploration of the use of body lan- 
guage and natural postures, finger spelling and 
American sign language. Theoretical foundations 
of total communication will be investigated. Is- 
sues related to deafness are presented. 

The Department 

ED 387 Intermediate Sign Language and 
Deafness (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: ED 386 

An intermediate level course in the techniques 
of manual communication with a continued ex- 
ploration of the use of body language and natural 
postures, finger spelling and American Sign Lan- 
guage. Theoretical foundations of total commu- 
nication will be investigated more deeply. Issues 
related to deafness are presented. 

The Department 

ED 389 Assessment of Students with Low 
Incidence Disabilities (F: 3) 

The assessment process, including norm-refer- 
enced and criterion-referenced devices lor stu- 
dents with severe handicapping conditions, is the 
primary focus of this course. Observation sched- 
ules, functional vision and hearing assessments, 
and environmental inventories are addressed. The 
relationship of the individual education plan (IEP) 
to the assessment process is stressed. Substantial 
fieldwork is required in this course. Prepracticum 
required (25 hours). Nancy '/.oilers 

ED 398 Working with Families and Human 
Service Agencies (S: 3) 

This course emphasizes work with parents of chil- 
dren with severe special needs. Topics include 



92 • Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings 



stages of parental acceptance of disabling condi- 
tions, transfer out of the natural home, chronic 
sorrow, development of home-based behavior 
management programs, and preparation of par- 
ents as teachers. A respite care field experience is 
required of students. Prepracticum required 
(25 hours). Alec F. Peck 

ED 403 Philosophy of Education (S: 3) 

This is an introduction to the philosophy of edu- 
cation, understood both as a systematic body of 
thinking about teaching and education and, espe- 
cially, as a process of analyzing arguments about 
teaching and education. Edward Smith 

ED 407 Curriculum and Instruction in the 
Secondary School (F, S: 3) 

This course examines such issues and practices 
related to middle and secondary school teaching 
as the history of American education, curriculum 
development, learning styles, crisis intervention, 
school organization, and various models of middle 
and secondary schooling. Students are introduced 
to school contexts in order to prepare them for 
participation in decision-making that affects 
school organization, curriculum, and learning 
outcomes. The course also emphasizes advanced 
pedagogy and strategies to enhance the learning 
opportunities for the variety of students teachers 
encounter in their classrooms. The Department 

ED 413 Models and Methods in Early Education 

(F:3) 

The major models of early childhood education, 
including the Montessori Method, the Develop- 
mental-Interaction Approach, Direct Teaching, 
and Piaget-based models will be presented and 
discussed in this course. Models and methods 
useful for inclusion, early intervention, child care, 
and parent involvement will also be reviewed and 
discussed. The general theme will focus on the 
ways in which different models address the indi- 
vidual, social and cultural differences that young 
children bring to the learning environment. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to explore their own model 
of early childhood education. There will be a spe- 
cific curricular focus on science education and the 
presentation of science concepts in different mod- 
els. Science lab sections will meet regularly. 

Maitha Bronson 

PY 414 Learning: Theories, Research and 
Strategies (S: 3) 

Basic principles of learning (overview, definitions, 
research) theories representing the associationist 
and cognitive traditions, problem solving and 
thinking skills are included. John Travers 

PY 41 5 The Psychology of Adolescence (S: 3) 

This is an analysis of the psychology and prob- 
lems of the adolescent years. Biological changes, 
value development, the influence of media, sexual 
identity, cultural influences, and relationships 
with adults will be discussed. Current philosophi- 
cal and cultural trends will be examined in regard 
to their impact on youth. Adolescence in other 
cultures will be discussed in order to provide a 
better perspective on American youth. Accounts 
of adolescence from literature will be used to 
supplement theory. William Kilpatrick 

PY 416 Child Psychology (F: 3) 

Child development is presented as a continuous, 

complex process involving the interaction of a 



biological organism with its physical, psychologi- 
cal and social environment. Normal development 
from conception to adolescence is discussed 
within the framework of contemporary theories 
of child growth. John Travers 

PY 417 Adult Psychology (F: 3) 

Life cycle theory; psychological needs; physiol- 
ogy; inter-personal relations; androgyny; sex roles 
and sexuality; vocational needs; family life; integ- 
rity and aging; facing death realistically. 

The Department 

PY 418 Applied Developmental Psychology 
Emphasis on Child (F: 3) 

This course will help teachers understand prin- 
ciples of learning and cognitive, linguistic, social 
and affective development as they apply to class- 
room practices. It will focus on the acquisition of 
strategies that enable teachers to assess and un- 
derstand how they and their students are con- 
structors of meaning. This course is designed for 
individuals beginning their professional develop- 
ment in education who plan to work with chil- 
dren. John Travers 

ED 419 Student Teaching-Early Childhood 
(F, S: 4) 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

This is a semester field assignment (300+ clock 
hours) five full days per week for graduate stu- 
dents in the final semester of the early childhood 
program. Placements are made in selected area, 
international, or out-of-state schools and non- 
school sites. Students are assigned to a full-day 
experience in an early childhood classroom. Ap- 
ply to the Office of Professional Practicum Ex- 
perience. Carol Pelletier 

ED 420 Provisional Practicum (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: ED 429 and successful completion of 
all required pre-practicum field assignments and 
courses. 

This is a semester field assignment (1 50+ clock 
hours) five full days per week, for students seek- 
ing provisional certification with advanced stand- 
ing in elementary education. Placements are made 
in selected area elementary schools. This is usu- 
ally taken in combination with a clinical experi- 
ence for standard certification. Students are as- 
signed to a full-day experience in an elementary 
setting. Apply to the Office of Professional 
Practicum Experience. Carol Pelletier 

ED 421 Theories of Instruction (F: 3) 

This is an in-depth review of modern instructional 
models classified into selected families with re- 
gards to their perception of knowledge, the 
learner, curriculum, instruction, and evaluation. 
Each student will be asked to survey models pur- 
ported in his/her own field(s) and to select, de- 
scribe, and defend a personal theory in light of 
today's educational settings based on personal 
experiences, reflection on current research, and 
issues central to the education of all learners. 

George T. Ladd 

ED 422 Internship in Teaching, Secondary 
Education (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses 

This is a semester field assignment (300+ clock 
hours) five full days per week for employed 



professionals at the secondary school level. Ap- 
ply to the Office of Professional Practicum Ex- 
perience. By arrangement. Carol Pelletier 

ED 427 Internship in Severe Special Needs 
(F, S: 3-6) 

Prerequisites: Permission of the program coordi- 
nator and successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

This is a field assignment for employed pro- 
fessionals in the final semester of the severe spe- 
cial needs program. Application to the Field Of- 
fice must be made the semester preceding the 
internship. Performance will be evaluated in ac- 
cordance with the standards set by the Massachu- 
setts Department of Education. Prior to the be- 
ginning of the internship experience, students will 
meet the faculty supervisor to identify objectives 
and expectations to be achieved. Apply to the 
Office of Professional Practicum Experience. By 
arrangement. Carol Pelletier 

ED 428 Student Teaching Secondary School 
(F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

This is a semester field assignment (1 50+ clock 
hours) five full days per week for graduate stu- 
dents in the secondary education program. Place- 
ments are made in selected area, international, or 
out-of-state schools and non-school sites. This is 
usually taken in combination with a clinical ex- 
perience for standard certification. Students are 
assigned to a full-day experience in a secondary 
classroom. Apply to the Office of Professional 
Practicum Experience. Carol Pelletier 

Full Practicum Deadlines: March 15th for fall 
practica and October 30th for spring practica. 

Pre-practica Deadlines: Will be posted outside 
the Office of Professional Practicum Experiences 
in April for fall pre-practica and in November for 
Spring pre-practica. 

ED 429 Pre-Practicum (F, S: 1) 

This is a field lab for students in graduate pro- 
grams leading to certification. Placements are 
made in selected school and teaching-related sites. 

Carol Pelletier 

ED 435 Social Contexts of Education (S: 3) 

Education is influenced by the social contexts in 
which it takes place. This course focuses on three 
social contexts which influence classroom prac- 
tice in a variety of important and overlapping 
ways: (1) the specific classroom; (2) the family, 
school, and community; and (3) the society and 
culture. The course, intended for individuals ad- 
vanced in their professional development, will 
examine how social contexts affect teacher deci- 
sion-making and practice. The Department 

ED 436 Curriculum Theories and Practice (S: 3) 

This course asks teachers to analyze the philo- 
sophical underpinnings of educational practices. 
It also asks teachers to examine their own philoso- 
phies of education and to construct meaning and 
practice from the interplay between their beliefs 
and alternative theories. This course is designed 
for individuals advanced in their professional 
development. Michael Schiro 



Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings • 93 



ED 437 Clinical Seminar: Teacher As Researcher 
(S:3) 

This course will provide a context where teach- 
ers can discuss experiences they encounter dur- 
ing full practicum. It will also help teachers learn 
how to be teacher researchers by (1) introducing 
them to different types of research, (2) helping 
them develop teacher research skills, and (3) in- 
troducing them to ways of creating linkages to a 
larger group of colleagues. This course is designed 
for individuals participating in their full practicum 
experience. The Department 

ED 438 Instruction for Special Needs and 
Diverse Learners (F, S: 3) 

This course will help teachers recognize and re- 
spond to the special needs of diverse learners. The 
opportunities that these provide for teachers and 
the ethical choices teachers face as they deal with 
classroom diversity will be addressed. The course 
will focus on the processes of classroom assess- 
ment, instruction, and organization. The course 
is designed for individuals beginning their own 
professional development in education. 

Jean Mooney 
Nancy Zollers 
John Junkala 

PY 440 Principles and Techniques of 
Counseling (F: 3) 

This is an introduction to counseling principles 
and techniques with an emphasis on interviewing 
skills. The areas of communication skills, assess- 
ment, and treatment planning within a helping 
model will be emphasized. In addition, group 
counseling, counseling culturally different popu- 
lations, as well as the legal and ethical dimensions 
of the profession, will be discussed. Skills train- 
ing will involve the use of role playing, observa- 
tion, and practice components. Open to counsel- 
ing psychology majors only. James Mabalik 

PY 444 Comparative Personality Theories (F: 3) 

This course will discuss the major theoretical ori- 
entations to the study of normal personality de- 
velopment. Psychoanalytic, self psychology and 
object relations theory, methodological and cog- 
nitive behaviorism, humanistic and constructive- 
developmental theory are examined. Contribu- 
tions of race, gender and social class to personal- 
ity are discussed. This course serves as a founda- 
tional course for counseling psychology students. 

The Department 

PY 445 Clinical Child Psychology (S: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the theory and 
research that provide the context for understand- 
ing the socio-emotional problems of children. 
Particular emphasis on the role of risk and pro- 
tective factors as they contribute to children's 
resilience and vulnerability to childhood prob- 
lems. Implications for clinical practice will con- 
stitute a major focus of the course. 

The Depaitment 
PY 446 Counseling Theory and Process (S: 3) 
Prerequisite: PY 440 or equivalent 

This course is an introduction to counseling 
orientations with an emphasis on the major mod- 
els within the field. Specifically, theoretical foun- 
dations, client and counselor dimensions, tech- 
niques, and the active ingredients of change will 
be explored in each model. Class format includes 



lecture/discussion, small group exercises, and 
analysis of case material from some of the origi- 
nators of leading counseling orientations. 

James Mahalik 

PY 447 Applied Developmental Psychology 
Emphasis on Adolescent (F: 3) 

This course will help teachers understand prin- 
ciples of learning and cognitive, linguistic, social 
and affective development as they apply to class- 
room practices. It will focus on the acquisition of 
strategies that enable teachers to assess and un- 
derstand how they and their students are con- 
structors of meaning. This course is designed for 
individuals beginning their professional develop- 
ment in education who plan to work with adoles- 
cents. John Dacey 

PY 448 Career Development (F, S: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the psychology 
and sociology of work and career choice, and ca- 
reer development theory and research from child- 
hood through adulthood. Exposure to counseling 
strategies, career planning resources, and pro- 
gram development in various educational and 
agency settings is included. The Department 

ED 450 Foundations of Educational 
Administration (F: 3) 

In this course students are asked to identify criti- 
cal questions for school administrators and to 
reflect on how these questions may be answered. 
Students are introduced to the breadth of educa- 
tional research, and invited to consider how mul- 
tiple-frame thinking can provide an overall view 
of educational administration including fiscal, 
personnel and program planning. The structural, 
human resource, political, symbolic and ethical 
frames are considered. Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

ED 451 Human Resources Administration (S: 3) 

In this course, students will acquire an under- 
standing of human resource management within 
the context of school organizations. In addition 
to addressing fundamental school personnel func- 
tions (i.e., recruitment, selection, performance 
appraisal, etc.) the course will explore and com- 
pare various personnel management paradigms, 
including contemporary business models that 
stress humane environments and worker partici- 
pation in all stages of planning and production. 
In this connection, the work of Ouchi (e.g., Theory 
Z) and Deming's Total Quality Management 
model will receive special attention. Acquisition 
of common standards for school administration 
and the integration of Boston College's Andover 
Themes will be among the principle aims of the 
course. Ralph Edwards 

ED 456 Educational Law and Educational Policy 

(F:3) 

This course for teachers and administrators ad- 
dresses the political and legal aspects of the role 
of education in our democratic society. It provides 
an introductory survey of the process of policy 
formation at the local, state, and federal levels and 
the role of law governing the provision of public 
preschool, elementary, secondary, and special 
education. Included are such topics as constitu- 
tional issues of religious freedom, free speech, and 
due process; the liability of schools and educators; 
student and parent rights and privacy; special 
education law; and the promotion of educational 



equity among all groups regardless of gender, lan- 
guage, race, religion, or socioeconomic back- 
ground. The course also provides consideration 
of professional ethics in education. 

Charles F. Smith, Jr. 

ED/PY 460 Interpretation and Evaluation of 
Research (F, S: 3) 

A course designed to improve the student's un- 
derstanding of the research literature in Educa- 
tion. The course concentrates on the develop- 
ment of the understandings and skills needed by 
the competent reader of research reports. Empha- 
sis is placed on the accurate interpretation of sta- 
tistical data and on the evaluation of published 
research. This course does not fulfill the doctoral 
requirement. John A. Jensen 

ED/PY 462 Assessment in the Classroom (F: 3) 

This course concerns the major problems of edu- 
cational measurement, with emphasis on the char- 
acteristics, administration, scoring, and interpre- 
tation of formal and informal tests of achievement 
with practical application to classroom use. Basic 
techniques of test construction are included. 

The Department 

PY 464 Intellectual Assessment (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

A critical analysis of measures of intellectual 
functioning, with a focus on the Wechsler scales. 
This course is designed to develop proficiency in 
the administration, scoring and interpretation of 
intelligence tests and communication of assess- 
ment results. In addition, critical questions re- 
garding the use of those instruments, including 
theories of intelligence, ethics of assessment, and 
issues in the assessment of culturally diverse, bi- 
lingual and disabled children, are addressed. This 
course is for Doctoral students in Counseling 
Psychology and Master's students working to- 
wards certification in school counseling only. 
Others by permission of the instructor. 

Maureen Kenny 

PY 465 Psychological Testing (S: 3) 

This is an introductory course in theory, selection, 
and use of standardized aptitude, ability, achieve- 
ment, interest, and personality tests in the coun- 
seling process. Measurement concepts essential to 
test interpretation and experience in evaluating 
strengths, weaknesses and biases of various test- 
ing instruments are included. Laboratory experi- 
ence in administration, scoring, and interpreta- 
tion of psychological tests. Kenneth IVegner 

ED 466 Models of Curriculum and Program 
Evaluation (F: 3) 

This is an intensive study of the leading models 
of program and curriculum evaluation, including 
those of Tyler, Stake, Scriven, Provus, 
Stuffelbeam and Alkin. Their strengths, weak- 
nesses and applications for various types of cur- 
riculum and program evaluation will be stressed. 
Each evaluation model will be examined in terms 
of the purpose, key emphasis, the role of the evalu- 
ator, relationship to objectives, relationship to 
decision making, criteria and design. 

George Madaus 



94* Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings 



ED 467 Practical Aspects of Curriculum and 
Program Evaluation (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: ED 466 or consent of instructor 

This course will cover the basic steps involved 
in planning and carrying out a program 
evaluation. Topics covered will include identifi- 
cation and selection of measurable objectives, 
choice of criteria instruments, use of various 
scores, common problems, out of level testing, 
analysis of data, interpretation and reporting of 
data, budgeting. Standards for program evalua- 
tion will also be covered. The Department 

ED/PY 468 Statistics I (F: 3) 

This is an introduction to descriptive statistics. 
Topics include methods of data summarization 
and presentation, measure of central tendency and 
variability, correlation and linear regression, the 
normal distribution, probability, and an introduc- 
tion to hypothesis testing. Computer instructions 
in the VAX operating system and SPSS statisti- 
cal package are scheduled as the laboratory com- 
ponents of the course. John Jensen 

Larry Ludlow 

ED/PY 469 Intermediate Statistics (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: ED/PY 468 and computing skills 
with the VAX operating system and the SPSS sta- 
tistical package, e.g. ED/PY 470. 

This course is a direct continuation of 
ED/PY 468 and the computing files built by the 
student in ED/PY 468 are used in ED/PY 469. 
Topics include tests of means and proportions, 
partial and multiple correlations, chi-square 
goodness-of-fit and contingency table analysis, 
multiple regression, analysis of variance with 
planned and post hoc comparisons, analysis of 
covariance, and elements of experimental design. 

Larry Ludlow 

ED/PY 470 Statistics Laboratory (F: 1 ) 

This lab is designed for students who wish to 
enroll in ED/PY 469 but do not have the neces- 
sary computer analysis expertise to meet that pre- 
requisite for ED/PY 469. Generally, doctoral stu- 
dents who have had an introductory statistics 
course elsewhere that did not include the use of 
SPSS and the VAX operating system would need 
to enroll in this course. Students enrolled in ED/ 
PY 468 should not enroll in this course. 

The Department 

ED 472 Secondary School Seminar (F, S: 1) 

Seminar taken concurrently with the secondary 
practicum for provisional certification. Topics 
include professional relationships, problem-solv- 
ing, examination of issues through case studies, 
and the development of a reflective approach to 
professional growth. Kilburn Culley 

ED 486 Braille Skills for the Visually Impaired 

(S:3) 

Students learn to read and write Grade II literary 
Braille and Nemeth Code (visually). Emphasis is 
placed on the preparation of Braille Media at all 
levels. Students are also exposed to automated 
Braille transcription using BEX for Apple and 
Duxbury for DOS and Macintosh OS. This 
course requires field-based assignments in Braille 
transcription and materials preparation. Pre- 
practicum required (25 hours). The Department 



ED 487 Blindness and Visual Impairment (F: 3) 

This is a first course in the study of work with 
individuals who have visual disabilities. The first 
half examines the evolution of services in terms 
of quality and effectiveness. The second half of the 
course focuses on psychosocial development and 
adjustment. The intent of this course is to help 
the student develop a personal philosophy and 
professional style of service delivery. 

Richard Jackson 

ED 488 Theories and Strategies for Teaching 
Emotionally Complex Students (S: 3) 

This course examines the complex needs of stu- 
dents with emotional or behavioral disabilities and 
develops understanding of best practice strategies. 
A study of high incidence and low incidence dis- 
orders will lead to the development of skills re- 
ported as effective in reducing both the incidence 
and consequences of such disabilities. Emphasis 
will be on teaching and learning practices and will 
focus on classroom-based strategies in determi- 
nation of primary and secondary problems, that 
can lead to positive conflict resolution. 

Philip DiMattia 

ED 491 Practicum: Multihandicapped (F, S: 3) 

Apply to the Office of Professional Practicum Ex- 
perience. The Department 

ED 492 Organization and Administration of 
Services for Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind or 
Multiply Disabled (S: 3) 

The histories of deaf, blind, and deaf/blind ser- 
vices are presented. Various etiologies of deaf- 
blindness are discussed along with their implica- 
tions for intervention with persons with deaf- 
blindness. Legislation and litigation relating to 
special services for individuals with deaf-blindness 
are overviewed. Students complete a project re- 
lating to services for persons with multiple dis- 
abilities. Several guest speakers representing vari- 
ous agencies and organizations serving individu- 
als with deaf-blindness present this course. By 
arrangement. The Department 

ED 501 Handicapped Internship — Moderate 
Special Needs (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and course work. 
A full time practicum for teachers of students 
employed as teachers of students with moderate 
special needs. Apply to the Office of Professional 
Practicum Experience. Carol Pelletier 

ED 502 Handicapped Internship — Generic 
Educator (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

A field assignment five full days per week for 
employed professionals in generic special needs 
education. Apply to the Office of Professional 
Practicum Experience. Carol Pelletier 

ED 504 Moderate Special Needs Field 
Practicum (F, S: 3) 

A full time practicum for students who have com- 
pleted all course requirements and pre-practicum 
in the Moderate Special Needs Program. Appli- 
cations to the Office of Field Experiences must 
be made the preceding semester. Apply to the 
Office of Professional Practicum Experience. 

Full Practicum Deadlines: March 1 5th for fall 
practica and October 30th for spring practica. 



Pre-Practica Deadlines: Will be posted outside 
the Office of Professional Practicum Experiences 
in April for fall pre-practica and in November for 
spring pre-practica. Carol Pelletier 

ED 505 Student Teaching: Visually Impaired 
(F, S: 3) 

This experience is designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the multiple responsibilities of the 
teacher/consultant in school settings. The intent 
is to place students in a supervised situation that 
enables the demonstration of provisional stan- 
dards for teaching students with visual impair- 
ments. This is typically a full-time placement of 
six to eight weeks duration (1 50 hours). Students 
also participate in a biweekly seminar examining 
topics related to clinical practice. Apply to the 
Office of Professional Practicum Experience. 

Carol Pelletier 

ED 506 Student Teaching: Multihandicapped 
and Deaf/Blind (F, S: 3) 

Apply to the Office of Professional Practicum 
Experience. The Department 

ED 510 Middle School Practicum (F, S: 3) 

A full time practicum for students who have com- 
pleted all course requirements and pre-practicum 
in the Middle School Program. Applications to 
the Office of Field Experiences must be made the 
preceding semester. Carol Pelletier 

ED 515 Seminar in Moral Education (F: 3) 

Topics will include theories of moral growth and 
moral education, moral education and sex educa- 
tion curriculums, the influence of stories on char- 
acter formation, the relation of morality to reli- 
gion, and the debate over values versus virtue. 

William Kilpatrick 

ED 520 Teaching Mathematics and Technology 

(F:3) 

This course will present (1) methods and materi- 
als useful in teaching mathematics to early child- 
hood and elementary school children and (2) the 
different ways in which technology can be used 
in the elementary school classroom. The course 
will consider the teaching of mathematics and the 
use of technology from both theoretical and prac- 
tical perspectives. The course will include a labo- 
ratory experience each week. Michael Schiro 

PY 528 Multicultural Issues (F, S: 3) 

This course is designed to assist Counseling Psy- 
chology students in becoming more effective ser- 
vice providers in their work with persons from dif- 
ferent ethnic and social class backgrounds, as well 
as with gay and lesbian clients. Specifically, it is 
designed to increase awareness of the socializa- 
tion process within particular ethnic groups, to 
extend the knowledge base of the socio/political 
and historical experiences of selected ethnic 
minority groups in the United States, and to 
expand the repertoire of counseling skills that are 
necessary to becoming a competent, effective 
multicultural practitioner. The course will also 
provide a review of the literature in the field of 
cross-cultural psychology and increase students' 
awareness of the issues involved in conducting 
research in this area. Elizabeth Sparks 

PY 529 Psychology of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 

(S:3) 

This course is designed for the student who is in- 
terested in the study of both the theoretical and 



Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings • 95 



applied aspects of alcohol and substance abuse. 
The course will focus on the psychological, physi- 
ological, sociological and economic aspects of ad- 
diction in society. The Department 

ED 542 Teaching Reading and Language Arts 
(F:3) 

This course examines the nature of oral and writ- 
ten language learning and development (K-12) 
within a variety of instructional perspectives. 
Topics include approaches to beginning reading, 
reading strategies, writing processes, second lan- 
guage learners, interrelationships among lan- 
guage areas, assessment, and research that affects 
classroom reading and writing instruction. 

John F. Savage 
Lea McGee 

ED/ PY 543 Psycho-Pharmacology for 
Counselors (S: 3) 

The focus is on techniques of synthesizing psy- 
chological and educational information into an ef- 
fective, individually appropriate educational plan 
for children with special needs. Individual case 
study methods will be used. Not offered 1994-95 

The Department 

PY 549 Psychopathology (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PY 444 or equivalent 

This course examines selected DSM-IIIR dis- 
orders and considers diagnostic issues, historical 
changes, theoretical perspectives and research. 
Through case examples students will learn to con- 
duct a mental status examination and interpret 
various forms of psychopathology. Counseling 
Psychology majors only. Elizabeth Sparks 

James Mahalik 

ED 550 Management Use of Computers in 
Education (F: 3) 

What is the present and future role of computers 
in educational administration and management? 
In this course, this question is addressed in a va- 
riety of ways: through readings, lectures, discus- 
sion, and particularly through hands-on experi- 
ence in using microcomputers. Students will be 
given experience and assignments concerning 
word processing, telecommunications, databases 
and spreadsheets for educational management 
purposes. The machine used in this course by 
most students will be the Apple Macintosh, but 
for most of the assignments, with the instructor's 
approval, other machines and software may be 
used. Walter Haney 

ED 560 Seminar on Issues in Testing and 
Assessment 

This seminar will examine testing and assessment 
from the perspective and context of the classroom 
teacher. It will consider how classroom realities 
influence the way teachers think about and carry 
out testing and assessment. Not offered 1994-95 

The Department 
ED 561 Evaluation and Public Policy (F: 3) 
This course will deal with the conceptual, theo- 
retical, and methodological issues underlying the 
use of research and evaluation strategies in in- 
forming policy decisions. The focus will be upon 
the use of Total Quality Management (TQM) 
techniques in the educational setting. Emphasis 
will be upon both the human and technological 
aspects of Quality Management. Ronald Nuttall 



ED/PY 565 Quantitative Data Collection 
Procedures: Theory and Practice (F: 3) 

Concepts of reliability, validity, measurement er- 
ror, sampling error, derived scores, norms and 
other measurement concepts are examined in 
terms of their applicability to the development 
and selection of tests, scales, questionnaires, check 
lists and other data collection procedures com- 
monly used in educational research. 

Walter Haney 

ED 569 Expectations and Evidence for 
Educational Technology (S: 3) 

The history and social role of technology in 
American society will be briefly reviewed. The 
course then focuses on several generations of edu- 
cational technology, including science laborato- 
ries, educational television and educational com- 
puting, and examines expectations and evidence 
regarding their educational effectiveness. Reasons 
for the contrasts between expectations and evi- 
dence will be examined. Students will undertake 
a project for the course on some aspect of educa- 
tional technology. The project will include both 
a literature review and some kind of research, 
using historical, survey, case study or experimen- 
tal methods. Walter Haney 

ED 577 Internship: Elementary (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

This is a semester field assignment (300+ clock 
hours) five full days per week for employed pro- 
fessionals at the elementary school level. Apply to 
the Office of Professional Practicum Experience. 

Carol Pelletier 

ED 579 Educational Assessment of Learning 
Problems (F: 3) 

This course focuses on formal and informal ap- 
proaches to the nondiscriminatory assessment of 
students with a wide range of cognitive and aca- 
demic learning problems. It is designed to prepare 
educational specialists in the process of docu- 
menting special needs, identifying current levels 
of performance and designing approaches to 
monitoring progress. Open to students in the 
Counseling Psychology, Moderate Special Needs, 
Vision Studies and Reading Specialist Programs. 
Not open to Special Students. Jean Mooney 

ED 586 Curriculum Research Seminar: 
Mathematics and Literacy Education (F: 3) 

This course will explore relationships that might 
exist among the fields of mathematics education 
and literacy education (reading and the language 
arts). Students will both participate in ongoing 
research projects and carry out their own research 
projects. The major content areas that will be 
examined will be the similarities and differences 
between the curriculum materials that exist in lit- 
eracy and mathematics education, the instruc- 
tional procedures advocated for use in the two 
fields, the research traditions of the two fields, and 
the myths that guide practitioners within the two 
fields. Michael Schiro 

ED 587 Remedial Strategies (S: 3) 

This course is oriented to the development of 
Individual Education Programs (IEP) for students 
with special needs. It includes effective instruc- 
tional practices for basic skills development, 



enhancement of content area instruction, cogni- 
tive and metacognitive learning strategies. 

Jean Mooney 

ED 588 Curriculum and Instructional Strategies 
for the Visually Impaired (S: 3) 

This course covers special subject matter adjust- 
ments and the "plus curriculum" of special skills 
for the student with visual impairments. Activi- 
ties include task analysis of special curriculum 
needs and writing adaptations to regular educa- 
tion curriculum. The course also covers curricu- 
lum and strategies for pre-school and multiply dis- 
abled individuals, adaptive technology, and con- 
sultation skills. The Department 

ED 592 Foundations of Language and Literacy 
Development (F: 3) 

This course is an introduction and an overview of 
language and literacy development. Contents in- 
clude the following: basic elements of language 
acquisition; current theories of normal language 
development; issues related to delayed or differ- 
ent language development; the transition from 
oral to literate language; the impact of cultural 
variations on school-based language performance; 
an introduction to bilingualism and second lan- 
guage acquisition for young children and more 
mature language users. Polly Ulichny 

ED 593 Introduction to Speech and Language 
Disorders (S: 4) 

Based on the development of normal children, 
this course will explore dysfunctions of speech and 
language that interfere with normal communica- 
tion and learning processes. The evaluation of 
language performance and the remediation of 
language deficits will be stressed. Students with 
prior course work in normal language acquisition 
may take this course for 3 credits. 

The Department 

ED 595 Assessment and Instruction for Students 
with Reading Difficulty (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: ED 542 or equivalent 

This course examines the methods and mate- 
rials related to formal and informal assessment, 
analysis and interpretation of the results of assess- 
ment, and instructional techniques for students 
with a range of reading difficulties (K-12). The 
focus is on the needs of students from varied 
populations. The course content includes consult- 
ing skills and laws related to reading and literacy 
issues. The Department 

ED 601 Seminar in Statistical Topics (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of statistics (PY/ED 468, 
PY/ED 469) 

Educational policy decisions assume models 
of the teaching and learning processes that are 
derived from educational research and theory. 
Underlying such decisions are technical issues 
that flow from logical analysis to understand the 
potential effectiveness of an educational policy. 
This course will explore the technical issues in- 
volved in currently contemplated policies such as 
a national test. Technical issues will include 
equating different tests, test fairness, test validity, 
evaluating school performance, and standard set- 
ting. Next offered 1995-96 Albert Beaton 



96 • Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings 



ED 609 Full Practicum: Early Childhood (F, S: 6) 

ED 610 Full Practicum: Elementary Education 
{F, S: 6) 

ED 612 Full Practicum: Secondary Education 
(F, S: 6) 

ED 613 Full Practicum: Intensive Special Needs 
(F, S: 6) 

ED 614 Full Practicum: Moderate Special Needs 
(F, S: 6) 

ED 702 Full Practicum: Reading (F, S: 6) 

ED 703 Full Practicum: Vision (F, S: 6) 

Semester-long full time field assignments for ad- 
vanced level students working in schools in a pro- 
fessional role. Individual placements are made 
according to each student's major or field of spe- 
cialization. Placements are selectively chosen 
from schools in the greater Boston area; place- 
ments in designated out-of-state or international 
settings can also be arranged. Prerequisites in- 
clude approval by the Director of the Office of 
Professional Practicum Experience, good aca- 
demic standing, and successful completion of all 
practicum and provisional certification require- 
ments. Apply to the Office of Professional 
Practicum Experience. 

Full Practicum Deadlines: March 15th for fall 
practica and October 30th for spring practica. 

Pre-Practica Deadlines: Will be posted outside 
the Office of Professional Practicum Experiences 
in April for fall pre-practica and in November for 
spring pre-practica. 

PY 61 1 Learning and Development: The Special 
Needs of Early Learners (F: 3) 

This course will focus on learning (including be- 
havioral, cognitive, and information processing 
approaches), motivation, and social development, 
incorporating the role of play in the learning and 
development of the young child. Individual dif- 
ferences and the effects of special needs on learn- 
ing and development will be examined and pro- 
gram implications will be discussed. Beth Casey 

ED 615 Teaching Across the Disciplines (F: 3) 

This course presents ways in which the natural 
sciences, social studies, the arts, health, and move- 
ment education can be taught in preschool and 
elementary schools. The course emphasizes an 
interdisciplinary approach related to the selection 
and use of teaching strategies and instructional 
materials. The course also examines basic prin- 
ciples of instructional theory, along with past and 
current policies that influence teaching. 

Joan Jones 
ED 617 The Principalship (F: 3) 
This course addresses the principalship and the 
changing roles of school leadership in a changing 
global society. Leadership models will be explored 
within this context and will include attention to 
contemporary educational issues such as equity 
and diversity, educational reform, etc., that im- 
pact school environments. Designed for princi- 
pals at all educational levels. Ralph Edwards 

ED 618 Finance and Facilities Management 
(F:3) 

This course will provide basic frameworks for 
understanding school finance and school facilities 
management. Students will gain an understand- 
ing of how public education is funded at the 



federal, state, and local levels. Contemporary is- 
sues relating to such funding will be closely ex- 
amined, including issues of fiscal equity and the 
operation of state and federal categorical aid pro- 
grams. Students will also examine school district 
and school site budgeting processes and relate 
them to educational planning. In addition, the 
course will explore definitions of what constitutes 
a good school facility and how to manage it ef- 
fectively by coordinating the use of fiscal, human, 
time and material resources to ensure the great- 
est benefits to students. The Department 

ED 619 Ethics and Equity in Education (S: 3) 

In this course, students are asked to consider not 
only what should be done to create equitable 
school communities but why the effort should be 
undertaken in a democratic society. Students are 
asked to examine the historical and political back- 
grounds of the major cultural groups in school 
districts, especially those that have been 
marginalized: persons of color, the poor, immi- 
grants, and women, and to explore the appropri- 
ateness of various curricular and instructional 
models for a wide range of children. Students 
consider critical issues and are introduced to edu- 
cational research that enhances reflection upon 
those questions. Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 

Ralph Edwards 

ED 620 Clinical Experience in Supervision 
(F, S: 3) 

As in the case of other practica in Educational 
Administration, the Clinical Experience in Super- 
vision is a semester-long, field based experience 
in the role of the certificate sought. Candidates 
work on site under the joint supervision of a uni- 
versity representative and a cooperating practitio- 
ner. The practicum is accompanied by a seminar. 
Apply to the Office of Professional Practicum 
Experience. 

ED 622 Clinical Experience in School 
Principalship (F, S: 3) 

The Clinical Experience in School Principalship 
is a one-semester supervised field experience of 
1 50 hours in the role of a building principal. The 
practicum is supervised jointly by a university 
representative and by a cooperating practitioner. 
Students are required to keep personal journals 
that will be regularly reviewed and discussed with 
them by their university supervisors. 

ED 623 Clinical Experience in Superintendency 
(F, S: 3) 

This guided field experience is designed to enable 
candidates to develop the competencies required 
in the variety of experiences carried on by assis- 
tant superintendents and superintendents of 
schools. Jointly supervised by a university repre- 
sentative and cooperating practitioner, the can- 
didate functions at the practicum site for a mini- 
mum of 1 50 clock hours. The practicum is accom- 
panied by a seminar in educational administration. 

ED 626 Seminar in Educational Administration 
(S:3) 

This seminar is designed to enable candidates to 
reflect on their roles as educational administra- 
tors during their practicum experience. Topics 
include research related to educational adminis- 
tration, along with day-to-day school 
management issues. Joseph M. O'Keefe, S.J. 



ED 628 Computer Applications for Educators 

(F:3) 

Appropriate computer software for educational 
uses must be evaluated, selected, and used in con- 
junction with an understanding of both curricu- 
lum and instructional theory, as well as an under- 
standing of the abilities and limitations of com- 
puters. Different types of computer programs will 
be examined to help educators learn how best to 
evaluate and select computer materials that will 
meet their needs. Some of the types of instruc- 
tion-related programs examined include drill and 
practice, tutorial, demonstrations, simulations, in- 
structional games, and word processing. Other 
types of educational computer programs used in 
the course include: data bases, data banks, 
authoring languages, testing and diagnostic pro- 
grams, classroom management systems, and child 
record keeping systems. The course will be taught 
on the Apple microcomputer. This is not a course 
in computer programming. The Department 

PY 640 Seminar in Group Counseling and 
Group Theory (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Advance sign 
up in Counseling Psychology Office required. 

Students participate in a 9-week experimen- 
tal group led by the instructor that focuses on 
group dynamics and the development of group 
norms. The remaining weeks of the semester in- 
volve discussions of the group experience and 
leadership role in the context of small group 
theory and research. Limited to 15 students. 

Bernard O'Brien 

PY 643 Practicum in School Counseling N-9 
(F, S: 3) 

Prerequisites: PY 440, PY 443 , PY 448, PY 464 and 
consent of Program Coordinator. Sign up four 
months in advance in Campion 309. 

Open only to Boston College Counseling 
degree students seeking certification in school 
guidance counseling grades N-9. Practicum in- 
volves placement in a comprehensive school sys- 
tem half time in both fall and spring semesters. 
The fall semester includes a pre-practicum field 
experience of 75 clock hours. Minimum hours of 
practicum are 225 per semester in addition to the 
pre-practicum. Students enroll for 3 credit hours 
each semester. The Department 

PY 644 Practicum in School Counseling, 5-12 
(F, S: 3) 

Prerequisites: PY440, PY446, PY448, PY465 and 
consent of the Program Coordinator. Sign up four 
months in advance in Counseling Psychology 
Office. 

Open only to Boston College counseling de- 
gree students seeking certification in school guid- 
ance counseling grades 5-12. Practicum involves 
placement in a comprehensive school system half 
time in both fall and spring semesters. The fall se- 
mester includes a pre-practicum field experience 
of 75 clock hours. Minimum hours of practicum 
are 225 per semester in addition to the pre- 
practicum. Students enroll for 3 credit hours each 
semester. The Department 



Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings • 97 



PY 646 Practicum and Internship I (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: PY440, PY446, PY448, PY465 and 
consent of the Internship Coordinator, Dr. 
Sandra Crump. 

This course is designed to provide practicum 
and internship supervised experience. The first 
100 clock hours the student spends at the site meet 
the practicum requirement. It provides for the de- 
velopment of counseling and group work skills 
under supervision through direct service to clients 
(40 hours) with individual (10 hours) and group 
supervision ( 1 5 hours). Students will be evaluated 
after the practicum period. The Internship (250 
hours) at the practicum/internship site is to en- 
able the student to refine and enhance basic coun- 
seling skills, develop more advanced counseling 
skills, and integrate professional knowledge and 
skills appropriate to an initial placement. It must 
include direct service ( 1 00 hours) with individual 
(6 hours) and group supervision (12 hours). 

The Department 

PY 649 Health Psychology (F: 3) 

This course is an examination of the role of psy- 
chology in the health care system from empirical 
and clinical perspectives. The cognitive, emo- 
tional and social factors that contribute to wellness 
and illness will be addressed. The Department 

ED 656 Administration of Local School Systems 
(F:3) 

The superintendent of schools has many audi- 
ences — the school board, parents, teachers, com- 
munity, and students, among others. This course 
will examine the relationship of the superinten- 
dent of schools with many publics, through the 
utilization of readings, experiences, field trips and 
visiting lecturers. In addition, students learn to 
meet specific program standards pertaining to the 
political aspects of education, public relations, and 
the use of community and governmental re- 
sources. Ralph Edwards 

PY 662 Projective Assessment (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Intellectual Assessment 

Theory, administration and interpretation of 
commonly used projective measures, including 
Rorschach, thematic, drawing, and sentence 
completion techniques. Students will learn how 
to conceptualize and integrate findings from cog- 
nitive and personality measures and to commu- 
nicate results in a written report. Critical issues 
in the use of these measures, including ethical, 
psychometric, social and legal concerns will be 
addressed. Case material will be used to illustrate 
the clinical applications of projective techniques. 
Limited to doctoral students in Counseling Psy- 
chology. Others by permission of instructor. 

Maureen Kenny 

PY 664 Design of Experiments (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of statistics (ED/PY 468, 
ED/PY 469) 

This course will cover topics in experimental 
design including full factorial, fractional factorial, 
use of design matrices, loss functions, and the use 
of variability as dependent variables. 

Ronald Nuttall 



ED/PY 667 Introduction to Multivariate 
Statistical Analysis (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of statistics 

This course addresses the construction, inter- 
pretation, and application of linear statistical 
models. Specifically, lectures and computer exer- 
cises will cover simple and multiple regression 
models; matrix operations; parameter estimation 
techniques; sources of multicollinearity; residual 
analysis techniques; partial and semipartial cor- 
relations; variance partitioning; dummy, effect, 
and orthogonal coding; and analysis of covariance. 

Albert Beaton 

ED/PY 668 Topics in Multivariate Statistical 
Analysis (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of statistics, and PY/ED 667 
or equivalent 

This course provides lectures, examples and 
student analyses that address multiple group dis- 
criminant analysis, principal components and 
common factor analysis, multivariate analysis of 
variance, multidimensional scaling, and cluster 
analysis. Albert Beaton 

ED 675 Consultation and Collaboration in 
Education (S: 3) 

This course provides students with a conceptual 
framework and specific strategies for participat- 
ing in multi-disciplinary evaluations of students 
engaging in consultation and collaboration with 
students, parents and professionals in a variety of 
roles. Case studies include a broad range of stu- 
dents with special needs related to cultural/lin- 
guistic differences, economic disadvantage, and 
handicapping conditions. Consideration is given 
to issues of professional development and ethical 
standards. John Junkala 

ED 686 Augmentative Communication for 
Individuals with Disabilities (S: 3) 

This course focuses upon the communication 
problems of persons who are developmentally 
disabled, physically challenged, hearing impaired, 
and deaf-blind. Students learn strategies for en- 
hancing communication and learn how to develop 
and implement a variety of augmentative commu- 
nication systems. The Depart?nent 

ED 703 Full Practicum: Vision (F, S: 6) 

For course description, see ED 609. 

ED 720 Curriculum Theory and Philosophy 

(S:3) 

An advanced-level course in curriculum theory 
covering such issues as ideologies of curriculum 
developers, methods of curriculum development, 
types of curriculum materials, styles of curricu- 
lum evaluation, and theories of the curriculum 
change process. For persons with teaching or 
curriculum experience. Michael S. Schiro 

ED 725 Reading Practicum (F, S: 6) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

This is a field experience for students in the 
Graduate Reading Program. Students are as- 
signed to a full-day experience working in a set- 
ting in which the candidate can assume the roles 
and responsibilities of a consulting teacher of 
reading. Approval of the Reading Program Co- 
ordinator is required. Apply to the Office of Pro- 
fessional Practicum Experience. 
Note: Students must complete 75 clock hours of 
field work. Carol Pelletier 



ED 726 Reading Internship (Full Practicum) 
(F, S: 6) 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

This is a semester field assignment five full 
days per week for students in a setting as consult- 
ing teachers of reading. Approval of the Reading 
Program Coordinator is required. Candidates 
work under the joint supervision of a University 
supervisor and a cooperating practitioner. Apply 
to the Office of Professional Practicum Experi- 
ence. Carol Pelletier 

ED 729 Controversies in Curriculum (S: 3) 

The course examines alternatives to the tradi- 
tional conceptions of curriculum, teaching and 
learning which have arisen over the past 20 years. 
The readings focus on four areas: the influence 
of culture on curriculum, critical or radical ap- 
proaches to curriculum, teaching and learning, 
relationships between literary and aesthetic theory 
and education and feminist writings on curricu- 
lum, teaching and learning. Ralph Edwards 

PY 740 Psychology of Women (S: 3) 

An examination of major theories and research 
topics in the field of the psychology of women: 
gender differences; theory and research on 
women's social, affective and cognitive develop- 
ment; discussion of social context; race and 
ethnicity of women; women's issues and implica- 
tions for counseling; methodological issues in 
conducting research in the above areas. Open to 
doctoral students only in 1994-95. 

Mary Brabeck 

PY 741 Advanced Seminar in Psychopathology 

(S:3) 

A developmental approach to understanding psy- 
chological disorders across the life span. The 
course will examine the relationship among the 
social, emotional and cognitive competencies that 
are important to achieving adaptation at each 
developmental level. Consideration of special 
populations, e.g., culturally diverse, homeless, 
people with AIDS. For advanced doctoral stu- 
dents. Mary Walsh 

PY 743 Seminar in Counseling Families (S: 3) 

This is a study of basic family system theory and 
intervention strategies. Didactic approach in- 
cludes role playing and case presentations. Con- 
current clinical involvement with families is rec- 
ommended. The Department 

PY 745 Biological Bases of Behavior (F: 3) 

This course will survey biological influences in a 
number of behavioral areas both normal and ab- 
normal. Genetic, neurological and psycho-physi- 
ological theory and research will be reviewed as 
these apply. Irving Hurwitz 

PY 746 Internship II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PY 646 and consent of the Internship 
Coordinator 

This course is designed to build on Internship 
I and corresponds to the next 350 clock hours the 
student spends at the internship sites. As such, it 
is designed to enable the student to further en- 
hance basic and advanced counseling skills, and 
to integrate professional knowledge and skills 
through direct service (140 hours) with individual 
(9 hours) and group supervision (18 hours). 

The Department 



98 • Graduate School oe Education • Course Offerings 



ED 770 History and Theory of Higher Education 

(F:3) 

The objectives of this course are an understand- 
ing of the evolution, functions, and problems of 
various types of higher education institutions; an 
appreciation of the role of higher education in 
promoting civic, economic and cultural life in a 
free society; an insight into the theoretical issues 
relative to purposes and methods of higher edu- 
cation; and an acquaintance with the major trends 
in college curriculum and instructional practice. 

The Department 

ED 771 Organization and Administration of 
Higher Education (F: 3) 

This course is designed to address patterns of 
organization and administration of institutions of 
higher education. Institutional characteristics and 
locus of decision-making will be examined. 

The Department 

ED 772 Student Affairs Administration (S: 3) 

An interdisciplinary study and analysis of college 
student services and student development pro- 
grams in higher education. The course will focus 
on the student affairs profession — its history, 
philosophy, and ethical standards, the services it 
provides, and its practitioners. Special attention 
will be given to the relation of theory to contem- 
porary student affairs practice. In addition, the 
course will examine how changing forces in the 
demographic, social, legal and technological en- 
vironment of higher education affect fundamen- 
tal issues in professional practice. The investiga- 
tion of theory, research, and current issues in stu- 
dent affairs will be supplemented by an overview 
of student functions in colleges and universities. 
Required course for all M.A. candidates in Higher 
Education. Karen Arnold 

ED 773 College Teaching 

Planning, organizing, delivering, and evaluating 
learning experiences for college students will be 
examined with special emphasis on research 
findings and new technologies. Not offered 
1994-95 The Department 

ED 774 The Community-Junior College (S: 3) 

This course is an examination of the history, val- 
ues, functions, and purposes of the community- 
junior college, with attention given to the rela- 
tionship of the community-junior college to 
higher education and American society. 

The Department 

ED 776 Critical Issues Within Continuing 
Education (F: 3) 

Student demographics and trends for the nineties 
commit institutions to recruiting non-traditional 
students who seek the necessary tools to improve 
the quality of their personal and professional lives. 
Surveying the factors affecting this growth in- 
clude determining organizational structure; as- 
sessing continuing education units; analyzing 
political complexities; uncovering unique adult 
learning styles and behavior; committing funds to 
adult learning programs; and encouraging coop- 
eration between agencies. The comparative ad- 
vantages of educational services offered by librar- 
ies, associations, businesses, proprietary schools 
and universities will be contrasted. 

James Woods, S.J. 



ED/PY 778 Theories in Student Personnel 
Development (F: 3) 

This is an intensive introduction to the theoreti- 
cal and research literature in college student de- 
velopment and related interdisciplinary fields. 
Basic concepts, theory, and current research in the 
field will be studied and discussed. Special atten- 
tion will be given to the implications of ethnicity, 
age, gender, and other individual differences on 
the development of students. Required course for 
all students in Higher Education. Karen Arnold 

ED 779 Global and Comparative Systems in 
Higher Education (S: 3) 

This course is a systematic attempt to examine 
how higher education systems are organized and 
governed in a variety of countries. 

Tedl.KYoun 

ED 782 Student Teaching: Intensive Special 
Needs (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Permission of the program coordi- 
nator and successful completion of all required 
pre-practicum field assignments and courses. 

A field assignment for professionals in the final 
semester of the severe special needs program. 
Performance will be evaluated in accordance with 
the standards set by the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Education. Prior to the beginning of the 
student teaching experience, students will meet 
the faculty supervisor to identify objectives and 
expectations to be achieved. By arrangement. 

Apply to the Office of Professional Practicum 
Experience. Carol Pelletier 

ED 783 Internship: Educator of the Visually 
Handicapped (F, S: 3) 

The advanced student in the Educator of the Vi- 
sually Handicapped Program is assigned to a 
school for teaching/consultant experiences under 
the supervision of the cooperating school staff as 
well as B.C. Faculty. Apply to the Office of Pro- 
fessional Practicum Experience. By arrangement. 

Carol Pelletier 

ED 801 Thesis Seminar (F, S: 6) 

A research course under the guidance of a faculty 
member for those writing a six-credit Master's 
Thesis. The Department 

ED 802 Thesis Direction (F: 0-S: 0) 

A non -credit course for diose who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their thesis. This course must be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. 

The Department 

ED 806 Institutional Research: Implementation 
and Utilization (S: 3) 

This course is designed for graduate students pre- 
paring for careers in higher education in which 
they will be the producers or users of institutional 
research. A primary goal of this course is to pro- 
mote effective collaboration and understanding 
between administrators and researchers. Admin- 
istrators will learn when and how to work with 
Institutional Researchers in planning and policy 
development. Researchers will learn how to trans- 
late administrative questions into researchable 
ones, how to select appropriate methods and tech- 
niques, and how to produce effective presenta- 
tions for decision-makers. The course will address 



policy issues relevant to a broad range of higher 
education areas: admissions, financial aid, reten- 
tion, academic program review, outcome assess- 
ment, curriculum development, faculty studies, 
community, alumni and employer surveys, and 
economic impact and school or campus climate 
studies. Ann Marie Delaney 

PY 813 Seminar in Social Development and 
Parenting (F: 3) 

This seminar will focus on the social development 
of the child and the influence of parenting vari- 
ables on social development. Martha Branson 

PY 817 Seminar in Adolescent Psychology 

(S:3) 

Topics discussed may include physical, cognitive, 
moral, personality, and interpersonal develop- 
ment. John Dacey 

ED 819 Educational Change: The 
Communication of Innovations (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: ED 720, ED 914, or consent of in- 
structor 

This course will examine how change that 
effects occupational behavior takes place within 
organizations and individuals as a result of the 
intentional behavioral interventions of change 
agents. George T. Ladd 

ED/PY 829 Design of Research (F, S: 3) 

This course considers topics pertaining to the 
conduct of research. Topics examined will include 
stating research problems and hypotheses, sam- 
pling strategies, operationalizing variables, ethi- 
cal concerns in conducting research, and the limits 
of research. A large part of the course is devoted 
to methodological strategies associated with var- 
ied research designs, including qualitative, histori- 
cal, single subject, survey, experimental, quasi- 
experimental, and correlational. Ronald Nuttall 

PY 840 Seminar: Professional Issues in 
Counseling Psychology (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: Consent of Director of Training 

This is an advanced seminar focusing prima- 
rily on ethical and legal issues in counseling psy- 
chology. Topics will also include certification and 
licensing, accreditation, professional identity, the 
history of Counseling Psychology, and future de- 
velopments in professional psychology. Open to 
doctoral students in counseling psychology only. 

The Department 

PY 841 Seminar in Evaluation and Research in 
Counseling (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Doctoral students in Counseling Psy- 
chology only 

A study of experimental designs in psycho- 
therapy research, uniformity assumptions, pro- 
cess-outcome confusion and criterion measure- 
ments. Methodological approaches include natu- 
ralistic-correlational studies and observations, 
generalist-manipulative and factorial designs as 
well as single case design. An examination of re- 
search on counselor characteristics, client vari- 
ables and treatment approaches. 

Sign up in the Counseling Psychology office 
in advance. James Mahalik 

PY 842 Seminar in Counseling Theory (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Doctoral students in Counseling Psy- 
chology only 

This is an analysis of major theories of coun- 
seling and psychotherapy. Students will be asked 



Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings • 99 



to explore these theories from the perspective of 
their position in the history of psychology and in 
light of their current usefulness. The seminar will 
also focus on helping students integrate research 
and counseling techniques into a coherent frame 
of reference for their own work with clients. By 
arrangement. 

Sign up in Campion 309 in advance. 

Sandra Crump 

PY 844 Seminar in Counseling Supervision 
(S:3) 

Prerequisite: Doctoral students in Counseling 
Psychology only 

Methods and techniques of supervising coun- 
selor trainees in counseling practicum, internship, 
or in-service training programs. Designed for the 
advanced graduate student who is planning to 
become a counselor supervisor or counselor edu- 
cator. 

Sign up in the Counseling Psychology Office 
in advance. Sandra Crump 

PY 845 Seminar in Group Theory and Research 

Prerequisite: PY 640 or equivalent. Doctoral stu- 
dents in Counseling Psychology only 

The theory and research on small group 
therapy are surveyed. Emphasis is placed on a 
critical review of both theoretical and method- 
ological issues related to the process and outcome 
aspects of small-group functioning. Students will 
be expected to focus on one aspect of small-group 
functioning in the process of conducting a review 
of the literature and developing a research pro- 
posal to address the identified issues. Not offered 
1994-95 

Sign up in the Counseling Psychology Office 
in advance. The Department 

PY 846 Advanced Pre-internship Counseling 
Practicum (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: PY 746 or equivalent and consent of 
Director of Training. Boston College doctoral 
students in Counseling Psychology only. 

Students must sign up in Campion 309 the 
preceding semester. Placements require the stu- 
dent to be available at least two days per week 
during normal working hours (Mon.-Fri. 
8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m.) Placements and practica 
seminars are for both semesters. Satisfactory 
completion of this course is a prerequisite for the 
doctoral internship. 

Work under supervision with clients needing 
counseling for any of the reasons usually occur- 
ring in a counseling agency. By arrangement. 

Mary Walsh 

PY 849 Doctoral Internship in Counseling 
Psychology (F, S: 1-2) 

Prerequisite: Consent of Director of Training. 
Minimum of 400 clock hours of counseling 
practicum (e.g., PY 646, 746, 846). Boston Col- 
lege Doctoral Candidates in Counseling Psychol- 
ogy only. 

Internships usually cover a calendar year be- 
ginning in July. Thus, applications must be sub- 
mitted in November of the preceding year. 

Students must complete the equivalent of one 
full year in internship either half-time for four 
semesters (1 credit hour per semester), or full time 
for two semesters (2 credit hours per semester). 
Placement in an approved counseling setting for 



supervised psychodiagnostic and interviewing 
experience with clients, group counseling and 
other staff activities. By arrangement. 

849.01 (1 credit) Sandra Crump 

849.02 (2 credits) Sandra Crump 

ED/PY 851 Qualitative Research (S: 3) 

Students will be introduced to the foundations 
and techniques of carrying out qualitative re- 
search. Topics include philosophical underpin- 
nings, planning for a qualitative research project, 
negotiating entry, ethics of conducting research, 
data collection and analysis, and writing /present- 
ing qualitative research. Along with several field 
exercises, the course requires a research project 
involving participant observation and/or inter- 
viewing. Polly Ulichny 

ED 859 Readings and Research In Curriculum, 
Administration and Special Education (F, S: 6) 

Under the direction of a faculty member who 
serves as Project Director, a student develops and 
completes a significant study. Approval by the 
faculty member is required prior to registration. 
By arrangement. John F. Savage 

ED/PY 860 Survey Methods in Educational and 
Social Research (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of statistics 

The design of surveys and assessments, in- 
cluding sampling theory, instrument develop- 
ment, and administering surveys, including train- 
ing survey administrators, quality control, data 
coding, data reduction, statistical analysis and 
inference, report writing, and presentation of re- 
sults. Practical issues such as using available sam- 
pling frames and minimizing non-response will 
also be covered. Ronald Nuttall 

ED 873 Curriculum Development and Design in 
Higher Education (S: 3) 

This course focuses on the evolution of the 
American college and university curriculum. It 
will examine the historical development of the 
curriculum with a particular emphasis on the de- 
velopment of the liberal arts curriculum. Students 
are encouraged to take ED 770 prior to this 
course, although it is not required. 

TedJ.K. Youn 

ED 874 Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis 

(F:3) 

Modern universities and colleges are increasingly 
faced with complex problems of institutional plan- 
ning and organizational uncertainties. How does 
analysis help to make appropriate choices and why 
are certain forms of policy analysis more effective? 
Are there any systematic connections between the 
process where the problem is defined and the 
process of implementation? How does the level 
of available knowledge and information help in- 
stitutions to solve their policy problems? In many 
respects, these questions are common to many 
governmental policy-making organizations, and 
will be studied. This course will review concep- 
tual models of policy-making and planning that 
are developed in economics and political science. 
It will particularly study those that might be use- 
ful to higher education. Ted I. K. Youn 



ED 876 Financial Management in Higher 
Education (S: 3) 

The acquisition and allocation of funds in insti- 
tutions of higher education are studied. Financial 
management emphasis includes an introduction 
to fund accounting, asset management, capital 
markets and sources of funds, financial planning, 
and endowment management. Included also are 
specific techniques used in financial analysis; (e.g., 
break-even analysis and present value techniques.) 

Francis Campanella 

ED 878 The College, Courts and the Law (F: 3) 

An examination of legal issues that affect higher 
education. Using the case approach, the course 
will focus on topics such as due process for fac- 
ulty and students, tenure, academic freedom, col- 
lective bargaining, and affirmative action. 

The Department 

ED 879 Seminar on the Higher Education of 
Women (S: 3) 

This seminar will focus on the interdisciplinary 
study of women in American higher education. 
Contemporary theory, research, and critical issues 
will be considered as they apply to undergradu- 
ate and graduate students, faculty, administrators, 
and student affairs practitioners. Restricted to 
doctoral students. Karen Arnold 

PY/ED 888 Master's Interim Study (F:0-S:0) 

All Master's students who have completed their 
coursework and are preparing for comprehensive 
exams must register for this course. 

Mary Brabeck 

PY/ED 910 Readings and Research in 
Counseling, Developmental Psychology and 
Research Methods (F, S: 3) 

Under the direction of a faculty member who 
serves as Project Director, a student develops and 
carries to completion a significant study. Approval 
by the faculty member is required prior to regis- 
tration. By arrangement. Mary Walsh 

PY 912 Participatory Action Research: Gender, 
Race, and Power (F: 3) 

A critique of positive forms of knowledge con- 
struction will be followed by a review of several 
methodologies that have contributed to the de- 
velopment of alternative forms of knowing. Ex- 
amples of participatory action research will be 
presented as resources for working toward social 
change. Ethnography, narrative and oral history 
methodologies will be discussed as additional re- 
sources for understanding and representing the 
individual and collective lives of participants and 
investigators. Participants in the course will work 
in small groups and may collaborate with local 
community organizations or projects in the de- 
sign and implementation of participatory action 
research projects. M. Brinton Lykes 

PY 916 Seminar in the Theories of Child 
Development (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This is an examination of the developmental 
sequence with particular emphasis upon physical, 
intellectual, emotional, and social aspects. Special 
attention will be given to particular topics or theo- 
ries that illustrate either phases of development 
or emphasize the interrelated nature of develop- 
ment (for example, heredity, language develop- 
ment, and socialization). Penny Hauser-Cram 



100 • Graduate School of Education • Course Offerings 



PY 917 Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior 
(ft 3] 

Students in this seminar will use longitudinal re- 
search studies to examine the coherence of indi- 
vidual differences from infancy through adult- 
hood. Sources of continuity and discontinuity will 
be examined. Topics will include attachment re- 
lationships, personality, social, and cognitive de- 
velopment. Longitudinal studies examined will 
include the Berkeley Growth Studies, the Block 
Project, the Minnesota Project, the work of 
Michael Rutter and colleagues, and others. 

Thomas Bidell 

PY 941 Dissertation Seminar in Counseling and 
Developmental Psychology and Research 
Methods (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Advanced Statistics and Research 
Design. Permission of the instructor. 

Focus will be on research topics relevant to 
psychology. The course is designed to assist stu- 
dents in the preparation of a formal doctoral dis- 
sertation proposal. Students must present a draft 
proposal for faculty and student reaction. An ac- 
ceptable dissertation proposal is required for 
completion of the course. 

Sign up in Campion 309 in advance. 

Kenneth Wegner 
Ronald Nuttall 

ED 951 Dissertation Seminar in Curriculum, 
Administration and Special Education (F, S: 3) 

This is a student-centered seminar that is aimed 
at assisting doctoral students in identifying, shap- 
ing, and defining a research topic. Students will 
be expected to develop an Intent to Propose a 
Thesis and to work toward the development of a 
full-scale draft of a Thesis proposal. Prior to the 
completion of the seminar, students will be ex- 
pected to have established a Dissertation Com- 
mittee. The Department 

ED 960 Seminar in Educational Measurement 
and Research (F: 3) 

This is a consideration of recent literature deal- 
ing with theoretical and procedural developments 
in measurement, evaluation, and research meth- 
odology. The Department 

ED 970 Case Studies and Decision-Making in 
Higher Education (S: 3) 

This course is designed to study present-day con- 
cerns and situations on campuses of higher edu- 
cation institutions by means of the case study 
approach. The art and science of decision-mak- 
ing are major factors in every case. 

The Department 

ED 973 Seminar in Research in Higher 
Education (F: 3) 

This is an advanced-level seminar on selected 
topics in higher education. Specific topics, such 
as research problems in the historical analysis of 
higher education, research problems in organiza- 
tions and governance in higher education, or re- 
search problems in student culture will be an- 
nounced in each year. Ted I. K. Youn 

ED 975 Internship in Higher Education 
(F: 3-6, S: 3-6) 

A one-semester guided field experience for stu- 
dents enrolled in higher education programs. Stu- 
dents will select an educational placement at Bos- 
ton College or an area college, university, or 



higher education agency. Under professional su- 
pervision the student will participate in the on- 
going work of the office and be responsible for 
appropriate assignments. Bi-monthly internship 
meetings will address educational issues and skills 
development in professional practice and exam- 
ine the relation of student projects to theory and 
research in higher education. Restricted to M.A. 
and Ph.D. students in Higher Education. 

Karen Arnold 

ED/PY 988 Dissertation Direction (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of academic advisor 

All advanced doctoral students are required to 
register for six credit hours of dissertation related 
coursework, at least three of which are 988. The 
other three are usually the Dissertation Seminar 
for the student's area of concentration. 

The Department 

ED/PY 998 Doctoral Comprehensives (F: 0-S: 0) 

All doctoral students who have completed their 
course work, are not registering for any other 
course, and are preparing for comprehensive ex- 
ams must register for this course to remain active 
and in good standing. Mary Brabeck 

ED/PY 999 Doctoral Continuation (F: 0-S: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree are required to register and 
pay the fee for doctoral continuation during each 
semester of their candidacy. A formal petition for 
extension of time must be submitted and permis- 
sion granted to continue in a doctoral program 
beyond the eight year period. Mary Brabeck 



Law School • Admission Requirements • 101 



Law School 

Established in 1929, Boston College Law School is dedicated to the 
highest standards of academic, ethical and professional development 
while fostering a unique spirit of community among its students, fac- 
ulty and staff. The 40-acre Law School campus in Newton is easily 
accessible by car and public transportation and has extensive aca- 
demic, administrative and service facilities. Boston College Law 
School is accredited by the American Bar Association, is a member 
of the Association of American Law Schools and has a chapter of the 
Order of the Coif. 



PRE-LEGAL STUDIES 

Boston College Law School does not designate a 
particular undergraduate program or course of 
study as the best preparation for the study of law. 
Since law spans virtually all of the social, economic 
and political processes of our society, every un- 
dergraduate major will include areas of study that 
can relate to subsequent legal education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

An applicant for admission to Boston College Law 
School as a candidate for the degree of Juris Doc- 
tor must possess a Bachelor's degree from an ac- 
credited college or university. In addition, the 
applicant must take the Law School Admission 
Test (LSAT) and subscribe to LSDAS. The Law 
School has no minimum cutoff for either GPAor 
LSAT. Every application is read by the Director 
of Admissions and/or a member of the Admissions 
Committee. Boston College Law School strongly 
encourages applications from qualified minorities, 
disabled or other students who have been socially, 
economically or culturally disadvantaged. 

Application Procedures 

Application must be made upon the official forms, 
and, as noted therein: 

• Official transcripts of all collegiate, graduate and 
professional study must be sent directly to the 
Law School Data Assembly Service. 

• Two recommendations must be submitted with 
the Application to the Law School. 

• The applicant must submit the Law School Ap- 
plication Matching Form, which is found in each 
applicant's LSAT/LSDAS registration packet, 
with the Application to Boston College Law 
School. 

• Decisions made by the Committee on Admis- 
sions will be mailed to applicants beginning in De- 
cember. The application fee is not refundable. 

• Acceptance Deposit: To hold a place in the class 
an accepted applicant must send an initial deposit 
of $200 to Boston College Law School within the 
time limit specified in the letter of acceptance. 
The deposit will be credited toward tuition for the 
first semester. A second deposit of $400 is due and 
payable by June 1 . If notice of withdrawal is given 
to the school by July 1 , $400 of the acceptance 
deposits are refundable. 



• First semester tuition and charges must be fully 
paid by August 1 5, or a date set in the tuition bills, 
in order to retain a place in the entering class. 

Registration for Bar Examination 

Each student intending to take a state bar exami- 
nation should determine, by writing to the sec- 
retary of the Board of Bar Examiners of that state, 
the standards and requirements for admission to 
practice. Some states require a student, prior to 
or shortly after beginning the study of law, to 
register with the Board of Bar Examiners of the 
state in which he or she intends to practice. The 
Dean of Students' office has bar examination in- 
formation available. 

Auditors 

A limited number of applicants, usually members 
of the bar, who do not wish to study for a degree, 
but who desire to enroll in specific courses, may 
be admitted as auditors. Auditors must prepare 
regular assignments and participate in classroom 
discussions. They are not required to take exami- 
nations but may elect to do so. Usually, credit will 
not be certified for auditing. Auditors are charged 
tuition at the per credit hour rate. 

Advanced Standing 

An applicant who qualifies for admission and who 
has satisfactorily completed part of his or her le- 
gal education in another AALS-approved law 
school may be admitted to an upper class with 
advanced standing. Normally, four completed 
semesters in residence at Boston College that 
immediately precede the awarding of the degree 
will be required. Relatively few students with ad- 
vanced standing are admitted each year. Each 
transfer applicant must submit a transcript of his 
or her law school record, a letter of good stand- 
ing from his or her law school dean and a recom- 
mendation from a law school professor. Applica- 
tions must be received by July 1 from those wish- 
ing to enroll for the fall semester. 

Financial Aid Programs 

All financial aid is processed through the 
University's Office of Financial Aid and the Law 
School Admissions Office. Awards are made on 
the basis of need and may include tuition remis- 
sion scholarships as well as low-interest loan 
funds. The Law School has also developed a Pub- 
lic Interest Loan Assistance program providing 



financial assistance to graduates taking tradition- 
ally lower-paying positions in government, non- 
profit corporations and legal services programs. 
Applicants wishing to be considered for financial 
aid may obtain the necessary applications by writ- 
ing to the Boston College Office of Financial Aid, 
Lyons Hall 120, Chestnut Hill, MA 02 167. 

Joint J.D./M.B.A. Program 

The Carroll School of Management and the Law 
School at Boston College have a joint 
J.D./ M.B.A. program. Students in the program 
are required to be admitted independently to both 
schools. Credit for one semester's courses in the 
M.B.A. program is given towards the J.D. degree, 
and, similarly, credit for one semester's courses 
in the Law School is given towards the M.B.A. 
degree. Both degrees can thus be obtained within 
four academic years, rather than the five required 
for completing the two degrees separately. Stu- 
dents interested can obtain detailed information 
from the Admissions Offices of both schools. 

Joint J.D./M.S.W. Program 

The Graduate School of Social Work and the 
Law School at Boston College have a joint 
J.D./M.S.W. Program designed for students in- 
terested in serving the combined legal and social 
welfare needs of individuals, families, groups and 
communities. Students may obtain the two de- 
grees in four years, rather than the usual five years. 
Joint degree candidates must apply to and be ac- 
cepted by both schools. Interested students can 
obtain more information from the Admissions 
Offices of both schools. 

Joint Degree Programs 

The Law School encourages individual students 
who may be interested in joint degree programs 
with other schools and departments at Boston 
College or, in some instances, with other univer- 
sities in the Boston area, to propose a program to 
the Law School's Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs. An average of six or more students each 
year are in programs that have been developed by 
students with the approval of the two schools in- 
volved. 

In addition to the above, students are permit- 
ted to take a maximum of four graduate level 
courses (12 credits) in other departments during 
their final two years with the consent of the As- 
sociate Dean. Also, students may cross-register for 
certain courses at Boston University School of 
Law. A list of courses is made available prior to 
confirmation of Registration. 

Tuition for joint programs is separately ar- 
ranged. 

London Program 

The Law School has a semester-abroad program 
with Kings College at the University of London. 
Students in the London Program have the oppor- 
tunity to enroll in courses taught in the LL.M. 
curriculum at Kings, and participate in a clinical 
European Law and Practice externship as well. 
Student placements have included positions with 
the court system as well as governmental and non- 
governmental law offices, and are supervised by 
a full-time member of the Boston College Law 
School faculty. 



102 'Law School • Faculty 



INFORMATION 

For a more detailed description of course offer- 
ings, applicants should consult the Boston Col- 
lege Law School Bulletin that may be obtained by 
writing to the Office of Admissions, Boston Col- 
lege Law School, 885 Centre Street, Newton, MA 
02159. 

FACULTY 

Richard G. Huber, Professor Emeritus; B.S., U.S. 
Naval Academy; J. D., University of Iowa; LL.M., 
Harvard University; LL.D., New England School 
of Law; LL.D., Northeastern University 

Francis J. Nicholson, S.J., Professor Emeritus; 
A.B., AJV1., Boston College; Ph.L., S.T.L., Weston 
College; LL.B., LL.M., Georgetown University 
Law Center; LL.M., S.J.D., Harvard University 

Emil Slizewski, Professor Emeritus; A.B., L.B., 
Boston College. 

HughJ. Ault, Professor; A.B., Harvard University; 
LL.B., Harvard University 

Charles H. Baron, Professor; A.B., Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania; LL.B., Harvard 
University 

Arthur L. Berney, Professor; A.B., University of 
Virginia; LL.B., University of Virginia 

Robert C. Berry, Professor; A.B., University of 
Missouri; LL.B., Harvard University 

Robert M. Bloom, Professor; B.S., Northeastern 
University; J. D., Boston College Law School 

Mark S. Brodin, Professor; B.A., J.D., Columbia 
University 

George D. Brown, Professor; A. B., LL.B., Harvard 
University 

Daniel R. Coquillette, Professor; A.B., Williams 
College; M.A., Oxford University; J. D., Harvard 
University Law School 

Peter A. Donovan, Professor; A.B., Boston 
College; LL.B., Boston College Law School; 
LL.M., Georgetown University; LL.M., Harvard 
University 

Scott FitzGibbon, Professor; A.B., Antioch 
College; J. D., Harvard University 

John M. Flackett, Professor; LL.B., University of 
Birmingham, England; LL.B., St. John's College, 
Cambridge; LL.M., University of Pennsylvania 

Sanford J. Fox, Professor; A.B., University of 
Illinois; LL.B., Harvard University 

Sanford N. Katz, Professor; A.B., Boston 
University; J. D., University of Chicago 

Thomas C. Kohler, Professor; A.B., Michigan 
State University; J. D., Wayne State University 

Cynthia C. Lichtenstein, Professor; A.B., 
Radcliffe College; LL.B., Yale University; M.C.L., 
University of Chicago Law School 

Zygmunt J. B. Plater, Professor; A.B., Princeton 
University; J.D., Yale University; LL.M., 
University of Michigan 

James S. Rogers, Professor; A.B., University of 
Pennsylvania; J. D., Harvard University 



Aviam Soifer, Dean and Professor; B.A., J.D. Yale 
University 

Michael Ansaldi, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Columbia University; J.D. , Yale University 

Phyllis Goldfarb, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Brandeis University; Ed.M., Harvard University; 
J.D., Yale Law School; L.L.M., Georgetown 
University 

Ingrid YHlfiinger,Associate Professor; A.B., Barnard 
College; J.D. , College of William & Mary 

Ruth-Arlene W. Howe, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Wellesley College; S.M., Simmons College; J. D., 
Boston College Law School 

Judith A. McMorrow, Associate Professor and 
Associate Dean; B.A., B.S., Nazareth College; J.D. , 
University of Notre Dame 

Sharon Hamby O'Connor, Associate Professor 
and Law Librarian; A.B., Southern Methodist 
University; M.S.L.S., Columbia University; J.D. , 
Harvard University 

James R. Repetti, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Harvard College; M.B.A., J.D., Boston College 

Robert H. Smith, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Wesleyan University; J.D., University of Chi- 
cago 

Mark R. Spiegel, Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of Michigan; J.D., University of 
Chicago 

Alfred C.C. Yen, Associate Professor; B.S., M.A., 
Stanford University; J.D. , Harvard University 

Anthony Farley, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
University of Virginia; J.D. , Harvard University 

Dean M. Hashimoto, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Stanford University;M.S., University of California 
(Berkeley); M.P.H., Harvard University; M.D., 
University of California (San Francisco); J.D., 
Yale University 

Frank R Herrmann, S.J., Assistant Professor; 
A.B. Fordham University; M.Div., Woodstock 
College; J.D. , Boston College 

Daniel Barnett, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., 
J.D., University of the Pacific 

Joan Blum, Adjunct Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Radcliffe College; J.D. , Columbia University 

Leslie Espinosa, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., 
University of Redlands; J.D. , Harvard University 

George Fisher, Adjunct Assistant Professor; A.B., 
J.D., Harvard University 

Elisabeth KeUer, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Brandeis University; M.A., J.D., Ohio State 
University 

Jane IC Gionfriddo, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
B.A., Wesleyan University; J.D., Boston 
University 

Daniel Kanstroom, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
B.A., State University of New York, Binghamton; 
J.D. Northeastern University 

Jean E. McEwen, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
B.A., University ofMinnesota;J.D., Northwestern 
University 



Alan Minuskin, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., 
University of Miami; J.D. , New England School 
of Law 

Francine T. Sherman, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
B.A., University of Missouri; J.D., Boston Col- 
lege 

Paul R. Tremblay, Adjunct Assistant Professor; 
B.A., Boston College; J.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 



Carroll Graduate School of Management • Master of Business Administration Program • 103 

The Wallace E. Carroll 
Graduate School of Management 



MASTER IN BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

The M.B.A. program provides mature men and 
women with a broad professional education that 
prepares them for management careers in busi- 
ness and other sectors of society. The Boston 
College M.B.A. program demands mastery of 
technical and analytical skills, but treats these 
skills as necessary, but not sufficient characteris- 
tics, of effective management education, hi addi- 
tion, Boston College seeks to cultivate in the men 
and women it selects an orientation towards re- 
sponsible, inquiring action. 

The program emphasizes development of ac- 
tion skills necessary to implement decisions and 
learning from experience, as well as an apprecia- 
tion of human values and the importance of ethi- 
cal behavior in management. The integration of 
concerns for technical competence, action effec- 
tiveness, and ethical values helps to define the 
distinctive character of the Boston College 
M.B.A. program. 

The Boston College M.B.A. program is com- 
prised of fifty-five credit hours and is offered on 
a full-time and part-time basis. 

ACCREDITATION 

The Boston College Wallace E. Carroll School 
of Management is fully accredited by the Ameri- 
can Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. 
The School is also a member of the Graduate 
Management Admission Council (GMAC) and 
the New England Association of Graduate Admis- 
sion Professionals. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCE 

The Master of Science in Finance program offers 
advanced financial training designed to build 
upon a Bachelor's or Master's degree in Business 
Administration with minimal course overlap. The 
program will prepare candidates for the applica- 
tion of advanced financial theory and practice, in- 
cluding current quantitative frameworks in 
financial analysis as they apply to a wide range of 
complex financial management problems. 

Candidates for the M.S. in Finance typically 
will have an undergraduate or graduate degree in 
management. Students with backgrounds in other 
fields are generally required to complete a core 
program in management. Applicants quantitative 
skills will be weighted heavily in the admissions 
decision. 

The M.S. in Finance program is composed of 
eight required and two elective courses, each 
worth three credits. This ten-course schedule is 
designed for completion in two years of part-time 
study, including one summer, or one year of full- 
time study. 

PH.D. IN MANAGEMENT WITH A 
CONCENTRATION IN FINANCE 

The Ph. D. in Management with a concentration 
in Finance prepares students for careers in 



teaching and research in finance. Students receive 
training in economic and financial theory and 
quantitative methods; small class sizes provide a 
supportive environment for the exchange of ideas. 
Students are required to submit a research 
paper by the end of the first summer. After com- 
pleting the majority of the 18 courses in the first 
two years of the program, Ph. D. candidates take 
comprehensive examinations. In addition, all stu- 
dents work as research assistants for 1 5 hours each 
week for the first two years of the program. The 
last portion of the program — up to two years — is 
devoted to the dissertation. Ph. D. candidates also 
work as research or teaching assistants during this 
time. 

PH.D. IN MANAGEMENT WITH A 
CONCENTRATION IN ORGANIZATION 
STUDIES 

Boston College offers a Ph.D. in Management 
with a concentration in Organization Studies. 
The program is designed to provide the knowl- 
edge of theory and research methods, as well as 
the practical skills that enable the student to be- 
come a productive scholar and an excellent 
teacher. 

The intellectual theme of the program em- 
phasizes organizational transformation, which 
refers to fundamental changes in organizations 
that influence their character and effectiveness. 
This theme reflects the faculty's view that orga- 
nizations in the 1990s and beyond will face fun- 
damental change at a faster pace than ever before, 
and organization members will need new knowl- 
edge and skills to make such changes constructive. 

The student is expected to be a full-time stu- 
dent at the University for four years in order to 
complete course requirements and a dissertation. 
Financial support as well as tuition remission is 
available for students who serve as research and 
teaching assistants while in residence. 

A separate brochure is available describing the 
program, prerequisites, and application proce- 
dures in detail. For further information, call 617- 
552-0450. 

JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Joint J.D.-M.B.A. Program 

The Graduate School of Management and the 
Law School at Boston College offer a joint J.D.- 
M.B.A. Program. Students in the program must 
be independently admitted to both schools. 
Credit for one semester's courses in the M.B.A. 
program is given towards the J.D. degree, and, 
similarly, credit for one semester's courses in the 
Law School is given towards the M.B.A. degree. 
Both degrees can thus be obtained within four 
academic years, rather than the five required for 
completing the two degrees separately. Joint J.D.- 
M.B.A. degree candidates are billed at the Law 
School tuition rate for their first year at the Law 
School and at the GSOM rate for their first year 
in the M.B.A. program. They are billed at the Law 



School rate for their final two years of the pro- 
gram (during which time they take the equivalent 
of three semesters' work at the Law School and 
the equivalent of one semester at GSOM). Inter- 
ested candidates can obtain detailed information 
from the respective Graduate Deans' offices. 

Joint M.S.W.-M.B.A. Program 

The Graduate School of Management and the 
Graduate School of Social Work offer a joint 
M.S.W.-M.B.A. Program. Students in the pro- 
gram must be independently admitted to both 
schools. Credit for one semester's courses in the 
M.B.A. program is given toward the M.S.W. de- 
gree, and, similarly, credit for one semester's 
courses in the M.S.W. program is given toward 
the M.B.A. degree. Both degrees can thus be ob- 
tained within three academic years, rather than 
die four required for completing the two degrees 
separately. Joint M.S.W.-M.B.A. degree candi- 
dates are billed at the GSSW rate for their first 
year in the M.S.W. program and at the GSOM 
rate for their first year in the M.B.A. program. 
They are billed at the M.B.A. rate the first semes- 
ter and at the M.S.W. rate the second semester 
in their final year of the program (during which 
time they take the equivalent of one semester's 
work at each school). Interested candidates can 
obtain more detailed information from the re- 
spective Graduate Deans' offices. 

Joint M.B.A-Ph.D. in Sociology 
Program (M.B.A.-M.A. also offered) 

The Graduate School of Management and the 
Department of Sociology at Boston College have 
a joint M.B.A.-Ph.D. program. To enter this pro- 
gram, students must be independently admitted 
to both schools. The joint degree program re- 
quires approximately one year less course work 
than the two degrees taken separately. Joint de- 
gree candidates complete 42 credits in GSOM 
and 39 credits and a doctoral dissertation in the 
Department of Sociology. Interested candidates 
can obtain more detailed information from the 
Graduate Deans' offices. 

Joint M.S.N.-M.B.A. Program 

The Graduate School of Management and the 
Graduate School of Nursing have a joint M.S.N.- 
M.B.A. Program. This program is open to nurses. 
Students must be independently admitted by both 
schools. The joint degree program requires ap- 
proximately one year less than obtaining the two 
degrees separately. Joint degree candidates take 
courses in both graduate schools each semester. 
Students in this program will be charged as fol- 
lows: During the first year in the fall semester and 
in the third year at the Nursing rate and during 
the second semester of the first year, in the Sum- 
mer Session and in the second year at the M.B.A. 
rate. Interested candidates can obtain more de- 
tailed information from the Graduate Dean's 
Office. 



104 • Carroll Graduate School of Management • Semester Study Abroad 



SEMESTER STUDY ABROAD 

Boston College maintains international student 
exchange programs with several overseas business 
schools. Students selected to participate in these 
programs spend the fall semester of their second 
year abroad. They may also spend the preceding 
summer in intensive language instruction pro- 
grams. Students who successfully complete the 
program abroad receive credit for four courses. 

SPECIAL STUDY 

In some instances, students may wish to pursue 
specific areas that are not included in the regular 
program of study. In the second half of the pro- 
gram there are options available to meet this need. 

Thesis Option: The thesis program provides an 
opportunity for the student to work indepen- 
dently on a specific problem of his or her choice, 
for example: (1) selecting and defining the prob- 
lem, (2) gathering, organizing, and evaluating the 
information, (3) interpreting the results and 
reaching sound conclusions, (4) preparing clear, 
logical written presentations; and (5) defending 
his or her position in an oral examination. It is sig- 
nificant to point out that this research approach, 
wherein the student performs largely on his or her 
own initiative, closely parallels the type of respon- 
sible assignment given to professional managers. 
The thesis, administered through MH 891 and 
MH 892, offers six credits. 

Independent Study Project: A student may pro- 
pose an independent study project to a faculty 
member; the satisfactory completion of the 
project will substitute for elective credits in the 
second level of the curriculum. 

To qualify for an independent study project, 
the student must submit a written proposal for the 
endorsement of the faculty member and the 
Graduate Dean. 

Research Teams: On occasion, students may be 
selected to work on research teams under the di- 
rection of experienced faculty researchers. In such 
cases, the student gains the added advantage of 
formal research direction and close working re- 
lationships with faculty members who are actively 
engaged in substantive research endeavors. 

TEACHING METHODS 

The quality of an educational program is reflected 
not only in the soundness of its curriculum but 
also in the effectiveness of its teaching methods. 
The Graduate School of Management does not 
identify one method of teaching as the most ef- 
fective medium for graduate instruction. Course 
content and individual teaching styles are impor- 
tant factors that suggest the use of several differ- 
ent teaching methods. In this regard, we recog- 
nize the privilege and the deep responsibility of 
the individual professor to choose his or her own 
method of instruction including seminar, case 
method, simulation, lecture plus group discussion, 
work groups, or other combination of methods he 
or she considers most effective for his or her 
course. 

M.B.A. PROGRAM OPTIONS 

The full-time option is a two-year program, com- 
prising fifty-five credits. Thirty-one credits are 
earned during the first year in the core curriculum 



required of all students. The remaining twenty- 
four credits (eight semester courses) are earned 
during the second year. Six of these eight courses 
are open to the student's election, with most stu- 
dents choosing to concentrate four of their elec- 
tives in an area of specialization such as market- 
ing or finance (see Elective Offerings and Con- 
centrations). The final two capstone courses in 
Strategic Management and Social Issues in Man- 
agement are required of all students and serve to 
integrate the program as a whole. 

The part-time program is usually completed 
in three and a half or four years and comprises 
fifty-five credits. In the part-time option, students 
generally attend classes two evenings a week and 
often take a course during the summer session. 
Their program is similar to that of full-time stu- 
dents — the core curriculum followed by six elec- 
tives and the two capstone courses in Strategic 
Management and Social Issues in Management. 

The program is designed for people from di- 
verse academic backgrounds including liberal arts, 
engineering, mathematics, science, education, 
health care, and business. 

The program is also designed to be of inter- 
est to students who already hold relevant gradu- 
ate degrees in fields other than management. 

M.B.A. candidates who have completed 
course work at other AACSB accredited manage- 
ment programs — with grades of B or better — may 
be allowed up to four courses (12 credits) of ad- 
vanced standing credit. 

M.B.A. CORE CURRICULUM 

The Core curriculum introduces the student to 
the functional areas of business. Concurrendy, the 
Core focuses on the development of analytical and 
decision-making skills and pays considerable at- 
tention to interpersonal skills and reflective man- 
agement practices. Throughout the M.B.A. expe- 
rience, students are encouraged to treat the pro- 
gram as an organizational setting in which they 
and the faculty have the responsibility to enact and 
to observe effective managerial practices and to 
criticize, humanely, ineffective practices. 

For example, students will write a paper ana- 
lyzing their own managerial effectiveness as mem- 
bers of study groups. Later, they will be asked to 
define and complete a major consulting project. 
The consulting projects will vary widely — some 
focusing on quantitative problems, some on sys- 
tems design, some on interpretations of the ac- 
tual activities observed in a live organizational set- 
ting, and others on solving specific problems for 
clients in the Boston area. These projects are pre- 
sented to the faculty and students at the end of 
the year. Awards are given in recognition of ex- 
cellence and achievement. 

The Core curriculum includes courses in Eco- 
nomics, Accounting, Financial Management, Sta- 
tistics, Computer Information Systems, Market- 
ing, Operations Management, International Man- 
agement, Organizational Behavior, and Perspec- 
tives on Management. All students must complete 
the core requirements. 

The following short descriptions introduce 
these courses. 



MA 701 Accounting 

New management technologies and changes in 
the business environment during the past two 
decades have caused managers to look anew at the 
traditional function of accounting. At the outset, 
course work will be concerned with the develop- 
ment and use of accounting information to evalu- 
ate the status and performance of business enter- 
prises. Attention will be given to the reporting of 
information for use by persons and institutions 
outside the enterprise. In the second part of the 
course, the focus will be on the use of accounting 
information in managerial decision making. 

MB 709 Organizational Behavior 

Effective business decision-making and imple- 
mentation require coordinated action on the part 
of many individuals within an organization's 
structure. The course is designed to teach the be- 
havioral skills necessary for individuals to become 
effective managers in order to diagnose, imple- 
ment, and change (1) individual human behavior, 
(2) group interaction, (3) leadership and power re- 
lations, (4) organization structure and design. The 
student discovers the nature of the patterns of in- 
dividual, group and organizational behavior from 
case descriptions, organizational exercises, group 
discussions, and role-playing activities. Individual, 
group and organizational behaviors are consid- 
ered from both the systems and historical perspec- 
tives. 

MC 707 Computer Information Systems 

The advances made in information technology — 
primarily computers and communications — have 
been revolutionary. We are rapidly moving from 
an era of information scarcity to one of abun- 
dance, and an organization's ability to manage this 
abundance is an increasingly important issue. 
Thus, a major challenge facing management is the 
effective creation and use of information and the 
systems that capture, structure and convey such 
information. 

Organizations have frequently failed to 
achieve their goals because managers did not have 
sufficient conceptions of, and experience with, in- 
formation systems and technology, their strate- 
gic use, and their relationship to strategic plan- 
ning. 

This course is a primarily non-technical one 
designed for executives and other managers who 
must resolve an often bewildering array of orga- 
nizational, resource allocation, integration, plan- 
ning and performance issues involving informa- 
tion systems, which are critical to the success of 
their enterprises. 

It is strongly recommended that students buy 
or lease their own microcomputers and have com- 
petence in the use of its associated software, in- 
cluding word processing programs, spreadsheets 
and graphics programs. These and other pro- 
grams will be used in the M.B.A. courses and 
should prove useful throughout a management 
career. 

MD 700 Economics 

The Economics course emphasizes the principles 
and relationships that form the basis for manage- 
rial decisions within die firm and projections of 
the economic environment outside the firm. Tra- 
ditional micro-economic, macro-economic and 
international economic concepts are integrated by 



Carroll Graduate School of Management • M.B.A. Elective Offerings and Concentrations • 105 



using a systems analysis approach. Application of 
economic theory to the solution of contemporary 
problems helps develop skills for taking manage- 
rial action. 

MD 705 Statistics 

Statistical techniques are used in many manage- 
ment disciplines. The statistics course will con- 
sider mathematical and statistical methods useful 
for the analysis of business problems. Students will 
learn statistical techniques such as correlation, re- 
gression, hypothesis testing and analysis of vari- 
ance. 
MD 707 Operations Management 

Prerequisite: MD 705 

This course covers the concepts, processes, 
and managerial skills that are needed in produc- 
ing goods and services. The course focuses on 
decisions that convert broad policy directives into 
specific actions within the organization and that 
guide the monitoring and evaluating of the activ- 
ity. The major techniques of quantitative analy- 
sis are applied to a variety of managerial decision 
problems. Emphasis is placed on developing for- 
mal analytical skills, especially in structured prob- 
lem solving and on recognizing both the 
strengths, limitations, and usefulness of manage- 
ment science approaches. 

MF 704 Financial Management 

Prerequisite: MA 701 

This course deals primarily with the firm's in- 
vestment and financing decisions. Topics treated 
intensively include valuation and risk, capital bud- 
geting, financial leverage, capital structure, and 
working capital management. Also discussed are 
financial statement analysis and tools of planning 
and control. Some attention is given to financial 
institutions and their role in supplying funds to 
businesses and non-profit organizations. 

MH 702 Perspectives on Management 

This is a two-course sequence that integrates all 
the core courses. It provides an historical exami- 
nation of management, as well as, a forum for the 
discussion and development of action skills and 
the cultivation of personal values and ethics in the 
art of management. 

In the first semester, students receive feedback 
about their managerial styles and experiment to- 
ward increasingly responsible and effective modes 
of management. In the second semester, students 
apply skills learned during the core curriculum to 
a consulting project with an organization. Student 
teams select a client, assess the client's needs, pre- 
pare a work plan, conduct a variety of consulting 
activities, and present results in an interim and a 
final report. 

M.B.A. Core faculty members and second- 
year M.B.A. students act as resources to teams. 
Class sessions focus on the consulting process and 
workshops build managerial skills. The course 
culminates in a two-day oral presentation com- 
petition. 

MK 705 Marketing 

This course focuses on the managerial skills, tools, 
and concepts required to produce a mutually sat- 
isfying exchange between consumers and provid- 
ers of goods, services and ideas. The material is 
presented in a three-part sequence. Part one deals 
with understanding the market place. Part two 



deals with the individual parts of the marketing 
program such as pricing, promotion, product 
decisions and distribution. Part three of the course 
deals with overall strategy formulation and con- 
trol of the marketing function. Students in this 
course will come to understand the critical links 
between marketing and the other functional ar- 
eas of management. 

MM 708 International Management 

In the international management course, students 
will identify and analyze those factors that create 
the unique characteristics of the international 
firm. Students will also learn how to solve specific 
categories of international business problems and 
how to take advantage of international business 
opportunities. 

Specifically, the first part of this course deals 
with the environment of international business. 
The theory of foreign trade and investment, in- 
ternational monetary flows and institutions, rela- 
tionships between governments and international 
firms, analysis of foreign cultures, and the prob- 
lems of developing countries are topics that will 
be explored. The second part of the course will 
deal with entry into international business and 
with international investment strategy. Then, the 
focus will turn to unique organizational issues in 
the international firm. 

Experience of the Core Program 

The foregoing course descriptions already suggest 
that the core program, whether taken on a full- 
time or on a part-time basis, is an intense experi- 
ence. The Core program is also an integrated ex- 
perience, far more coherent than the different 
course descriptions can suggest. Integration is 
achieved through those special sessions reserved 
lor integrative events and exercises, study-group 
meetings to bring different points of view to bear 
on cases and theories, and the field research 
projects undertaken as part of the Perspectives on 
Management course. 

Throughout the Core program, students will 
repeatedly be put in the position of performing 
professionally, whether in terms of oral or writ- 
ten presentations or in terms of managing a group 
to accomplish certain tasks. Students will receive 
feedback about their managerial style and will be 
asked to experiment toward increasingly respon- 
sible and effective modes of management. The 
overall aim of the Core curriculum is to prepare 
students not just to think, but to act effectively 
under conditions of complexity and uncertainty. 

Required Capstone Courses 

After completing the Core courses, students take 
two integrative capstone courses — Strategic Man- 
agement and Social Issues in Management — dur- 
ing the second half of their program, along with 
six elective courses. 

MD 710 Strategic Management 

Prerequisite: First-year M.B.A. core curriculum 

The strategic management course deals with 
the overall general management of an organiza- 
tion. It stresses the role of the manager as strate- 
gist and coordinator whose function is to integrate 
the conflicting internal forces that arise from 
among the various organizational units while si- 
multaneously adapting to the external pressures 
that originate from a changing environment. 



Case analyses of organizations of different 
types, sizes, industries, and stages of development 
provide the basis for determining organizational 
strategies and policies under conditions of uncer- 
tainty and for developing the analytical, concep- 
tual, decision-making, and human skills appropri- 
ate to the role of the general manager. The stu- 
dent is given ample opportunity to review differ- 
ent managerial philosophies and styles and the 
role that managerial values play in strategy for- 
mulation. In this context, the student is asked to 
ponder what his/her answer to the questions of 
management will be. 

The course serves as an integrating experience 
for the M.B.A. Program because it draws heavily 
upon and uses much of the knowledge and skills 
developed in the Core curriculum. 

MD 711 Social Issues in Management 

Prerequisite: MY) 710 

This course concentrates on the dynamic ex- 
ternal environment surrounding the organization. 
It views the external environment from several 
perspectives: as a complex set of interrelated eco- 
nomic, legal, political, social, ecological, and cul- 
tural influences upon the organization, as a con- 
stellation of publics or constituencies (suppliers, 
unions, stockholders, government, local commu- 
nity, pressure groups, etc.) affecting the organi- 
zation, or as a set of social issues (e.g., consumer- 
ism, pollution, discrimination, public disclosure, 
etc.) involving the organization and society. 

Through case analyses the student gains in- 
sight into the complicated interrelationships be- 
tween the organization and its surrounding envi- 
ronment and learns skills useful in scanning and 
coping with that environment. Environmental 
analysis, which considers such topics as ideology 
and social contract, corporate power, formulat- 
ing corporate social policy, and social auditing, 
involves the student in designing managerial re- 
sponses to deal with problems or issues posed by 
the social environment. 

In dealing with these problems and issues, 
societal and a managerial perspective is main- 
tained. That is, society's needs, wants, and values 
are considered along with what should be the or- 
ganizational and managerial responses. In this 
context, students develop awareness of the prob- 
lems encountered when making decisions under 
conditions of value conflicts and learn about the 
role of the general manager as a linchpin between 
the organization and its environment. 

M.B.A. ELECTIVE OFFERINGS AND 
CONCENTRATIONS 

Beyond the core curriculum and the two integra- 
tive capstone courses, students take six free elec- 
tives of which as many as four electives can be in 
a selected concentration area with the balance in 
other areas. Concentrations are offered in the 
following areas: Accounting, Computer Science, 
Financial Management, Marketing, Organiza- 
tional Studies, Operations Management, and 
Strategic Management. The concentrations may 
include approved courses from other areas of the 
M.B.A. Program as well as approved courses of- 
fered by other colleges and schools of the Uni- 
versity. An M.B.A. student may choose to tailor 
electives. Any student who wishes to do so may 
offer for consideration a package of logically 



106 • Carroll Gradua if. School of Management • Career Services 



interrelated subjects differing from any concen- 
tration specified — for example, in the areas of 
Public Management or International Manage- 
ment. The set of courses will be accepted in sat- 
isfaction of the concentration requirement with 
the written approval of the assigned faculty mem- 
ber in the area that most closely relates to the 
student's prospectus. 

A thesis written by the student and approved 
by the faculty may be elected. The thesis, admin- 
istered through MH 891 and MH 892, offers six 
credits. 

The elective courses available for concentra- 
tions are described in the Carroll Graduate School 
of Management Bulletin. 

CAREER SERVICES 

The Office of Career Services at the Carroll 
School of iManagement provides services tailored 
to the needs of M.B.A. and M.S.F. students and 
alumni. Located in Room 210, Lyons Hall, the 
office supports students and alumni in choosing 
and pursuing their career goals through a variety 
of services. 

Counseling and Career Training 

Advising: The Office of Career Services offers 
individual career advising by appointment. 
Whether students are weighing career options, 
seeking assistance in resume writing, or prepar- 
ing for an interview, a staff of professional career 
counselors can provide guidance and strategies. 
Simulated interviews on videotape also provide 
valuable practice and an opportunity for construc- 
tive feedback. 

Programs: In collaboration with employers, the 
Office conducts skills workshops each fall and 
spring semester. Topics include self-assessment, 
marketing strategies, resume writing, and inter- 
viewing. In addition, an annual series of career 
panels address subjects like finance, marketing, 
consulting, and human resources. 
Field Trips: To enhance communication be- 
tween the business community and students, the 
Office coordinates company tours. During these 
trips, which include panel discussions, students 
can observe and interact with executives in 
finance, consulting, operations, and marketing. 
Resources: The Carroll School of Management 
Office of Career Services maintains a library with 
reference books, material on specific topics such 
as interviewing techniques, videocassettes of ca- 
reer panels and workshops, and literature and 
annual reports from over 800 major organizations. 
Recruitment and Employment Opportunities: 
Students are assisted in their job search through 
on-campus and off-campus recruiting programs. 
Summer and permanent job listings are posted 
daily, and a bi-monthly newsletter is available at 
the Office or by subscription. Finally, each year 
the Office compiles the resumes of graduating 
M.B.A. and M.S.F. candidates in a book that is 
distributed to over 400 employers. 
Fall Career Fair: Sponsored by the office and the 
Student Employment Committee, the Pall Career 
Fair acquaints students with companies and with 
career opportunities in particular industries. Over 
30 employers participate in this annual forum that 
attracts approximately 150 students. 



Greater Boston M.B.A. Job Fair: Each spring, 
a consortium of eight area universities, including 
the Carroll School of Management, sponsors a job 
fair attracting approximately 40 companies. This 
is an excellent opportunity for students to obtain 
employment leads, interviews, and company in- 
formation. 

Alumni Connections 

The University is known for the enthusiasm and 
loyalty of its alumni, and the Carroll School of 
Management is not exception. With many Carroll 
School of Management alumni living and work- 
ing in the greater Boston area, as well as through- 
out the country and the world, this network is an 
invaluable resource to students and recent gradu- 
ates. Alumni participate in campus programs and 
workshops, provide informational interviews and 
create employment opportunities for graduates in 
their own organizations. To assist students and 
graduates in networking with alumni, the Office 
provides alumni data base printouts sorted by 
company, location, and functional area. 

Corporate Outreach 

To increase program awareness and to solicit job 
listings, the Office of Career Services is in fre- 
quent contact with over 1 ,000 employers during 
the year. As an active member of the greater Bos- 
ton business community, the Carroll School of 
Management is a member of the international 
Business Center, the Center for Total Quality 
Management, the Executive Group of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, and Opportunities in 
Boston/Private Industry Council (a Boston con- 
sortium dedicated to attracting and retaining 
people of color in Boston). In addition, Boston 
College's partnership with a group of Wall Street 
executives, the Boston College Wall Street Coun- 
cil, provides a foundation for career opportuni- 
ties on Wall Street. 

ADMISSION INFORMATION 

Master of Business Administration 

The Carroll School of Management welcomes 
applications from graduates of accredited colleges 
and universities. For the M.B.A. program, the Ad- 
mission Committee considers applicants with 
academic backgrounds from virtually all areas of 
study, including liberal arts, business administra- 
tion, social sciences, physical sciences, engineer- 
ing, and law. 

Courses in business administration or man- 
agement are not required for admission into the 
Carroll School of Management M.B.A.program. 
However, students are expected to be proficient 
in communication skills and mathematics. 

In its M.B.A. candidates, the Admission Com- 
mittee looks for evidence of sound scholarship and 
management potential. Work experience and aca- 
demic excellence are significant criteria in their 
evaluation. With few exceptions, students enter 
the program after at least two years of full-time 
work experience. Leadership and community in- 
volvement are also important factors in admission 
decisions. 

Master of Science in Finance 

Most students enter the M.S.F. program with a 
background in business or management. Appli- 
cants with undergraduate or graduate degrees in 



other subject areas are encouraged to apply early 
so that they will have the opportunity to fulfill 
prerequisites that may be required before start- 
ing the program. 

An applicant's quantitative skills will be 
weighed heavily in the admission decision. Admis- 
sion decisions are made by the M.S.F. Admission 
Committee that is composed mostly of Finance 
faculty members who teach in the Carroll School 
of Management. The GMAT is required for ad- 
mission. 

Note: Candidates who wish to be considered for 
assistantships must submit a cover letter of inter- 
est along with a resume with their application by 
November 1 for January admission and April 1 for 
September admission. 

Candidates will generally be notified of the 
Admission Committee's decision regarding their 
application within four to six weeks. 

Ph.D. in Finance 

Admission to the Ph.D. program is open to 
applicants who show evidence of strong intellec- 
tual abilities, a commitment to research and teach- 
ing, and previous preparation in an analytical field. 
Students are required to have demonstrated com- 
petence and basic knowledge of finance. A student 
entering the program without such a background 
may be required to take additional courses.The 
GMAT and GRE are required for admission. 

Ph.D in Organizational Studies 

Admission to the Ph.D. program is open to ap- 
plicants who show evidence of strong intellectual 
capabilities, a commitment to research and teach- 
ing, and previous academic preparation in fields 
related to management. Students are required to 
have demonstrated competence in the functional 
areas of management. Applicants who have not 
already received an M.B.A. or have not completed 
the equivalent of the M.B.A. core curriculum 
prior to entering the program may be required to 
take additional courses. The GMAT or GRE is 
required for admission. 

For more information contact Professor Wil- 
liam Stevenson at 617-552-0458. 

For More Information 

Applicants to the M.B.A., M.S.F. and Ph.D. in Fi- 
nance programs may direct inquiries to Wallace 
E. Carroll Graduate School of Management, 
Boston College, Lyons Hall, Room 210, Chest- 
nut Hill, MA 02167-3808, 617-552-3920. 

International Students 

All applicants who did their undergraduate work 
outside the United States must have the equiva- 
lent of an American bachelor's degree (equiva- 
lency to be determined by the dean or registrar 
of the university the student has attended). In 
addition, all students whose first language is not 
English or who have not graduated from an 
American university are required to take the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), in- 
cluding the Test of Written English (TWE) and 
the Test of Spoken English (TSE). The Ph.D. in 
Finance and the M.S.F. program require the 
TOEFL only. 

The minimum score on the TOEFL is a 600 
for the M.B.A. program and Ph.D. in Organiza- 
tion Studies. For the TSE the minimum accept- 
able score is a 250 for the M.B.A. program only; 



Carroll Graduate Sci iool of Management • Tuition and Expenses • 107 



for the TWE the minimum acceptable score is a 
5.0 for the M.B.A. program only. An official score 
report should be sent to the Wallace E. Carroll 
School of Management, Lyons Hall 210, Boston 
College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167, U.S.A. Ap- 
plicants must take the TOEFL on or before the 
March 1994 test date. 

Note: If the applicant cannot arrange to take 
the TSE, he or she will be required to make an 
appointment with one of the admission officers 
to have an oral interview. The purpose of the oral 
interview is to provide the applicant with another 
opportunity to show how strong his or her En- 
glish skills are for our program. The interview 
must be scheduled during the months of January 
and February. 

International M.B.A. applicants only must also 
provide financial certification for two years. 

Prospective international students with par- 
ticular questions may wish to write to the Inter- 
national Student Advisor at Boston College, 
McElroy Commons, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167, 
U.S.A. 

TUITION AND EXPENSES 

Tuition for the 1994-1995 academic year for a 
first-year full-time M.B.A. student is $17,220 for 
the M.B.A. program; $1,722 per course for 
M.B.A., M.S.F. and Ph.D. courses. Tuition is 
charged on a per credit basis. Other expenses in- 
clude books, supplies, fees, and living expenses. 

The estimated cost of books and supplies is 
$90 per course. In certain courses, laboratory fees 
are charged to cover the costs of special materi- 
als, cases, and computer time. 

Fees, including a nonrefundable application 
fee, transcripts, student activity fee, and ID card 
fee, will average around $125. 

Living expenses will vary. For full-time stu- 
dents living away from home, a realistic estimate 
is $5,52 5.00 per semester. Please refer to the chart 
for a sample budget. 

Note: Tuition rates, all fees, rules and regulations, 
courses, and course content are subject to revision 
by the President and Board of Trustees or Col- 
lege Dean at any time. 

Full-Time MBA Budget 1994-1995 

Tuition $17,220 

Rent, Food, and Personal Expenses $11,050 

Books and Supplies $1,000 

Local Transportation $330 

Approximate Car Insurance $ 1 , 1 00 

Medical Insurance $550 

Various Fees $125 

Total Cost $31,375 

All tuition and fees are due and payable in full 
by September 15th for the fall semester and by 
January 15th for the spring semester. Students 
who have not resolved their bill with the Student 
Account Office by October 1 will be withdrawn 
from the University. 

Deferred Payment 

Students who prefer to make payments on a 
monthly basis should contact the Student Account 
Office, More Hall, Room 380, 617-552-3908, for 
details of installment loan plans available through 
local lending institutions. In cases of extreme 
hardship, students should make appointments to 



discuss their individual situations with represen- 
tatives of the Student Account Office. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Graduate Assistantships and 
Scholarships 

The Carroll School of Management offers gradu- 
ate assistantships or scholarships to approximately 
one-quarter of the entering full-time M.B.A. and 
M.S.F. classes. Assistantships and scholarships are 
merit-based awards. Award Recipients usually 
have two or more years of full-time work experi- 
ence, 600 or above on the GMAT, 3.4 or above 
grade point average, and a strong set of applica- 
tion materials. 

Note: Interested applicants must submit with 
their application a cover letter describing their 
skills and areas of interest and an updated resume. 
These materials must be submitted to the M.B.A. 
program by March 1, and to the M.S.F. program 
by November 1 for January admission or April 1 
for September admission. 

Graduate assistantships involve teaching, re- 
search, or administrative duties in exchange for 
tuition remission. 

Students are generally appointed to 8-hour or 
16-hour assistantships. There are a limited num- 
ber of assistantships available to both domestic 
and international applicants. 

Eight-hour assistantships carry 12 credits (4 
courses) of tuition remission. Sixteen-hour assis- 
tantships carry 31 credits (11 courses) of tuition 
remission for first-year students and 24 credits (8 
courses) of tuition remission for second-year stu- 
dents. Tuition remission is considered taxable 
income. Scholarships are generally in the amount 
of $6,000. 

Final decisions regarding assistantships and 
scholarships are made in April. Students who re- 
ceive a scholarship or assistantship during the first 
year and maintain a cumulative grade point aver- 
age of at least a 3.0 are eligible for consideration 
for continuing support during the second year, 
subject to performance evaluation by their super- 
visor. 

Note: There are a limited number of assistant- 
ships open to second-year students who did not 
receive support for their first year of study. 

Ph.D. candidates, upon completion of any 
necessary prerequisite courses, receive full tuition 
remission and an annual stipend for up to four 
years of full-time study. In return, each candidate 
works as a research assistant during the first two 
years and as either a research assistant or a teach- 
ing assistant for the second two years. 

University Financial Aid 

In addition to the assistantships and scholarships 
offered through the Carroll School of Manage- 
ment, the University Financial Aid Office offers 
a variety of programs to help students finance 
their education. See pages 7 and 8 of the Univer- 
sity section of this Catalog for more information. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES 

Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing credit may be allowed for 
M.B.A. students who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted coursework, with a grade of B or better, in 



other accredited M.B.A. programs. Advanced 
standing credits reduce overall degree require- 
ments. M.B.A. candidates may be allowed up to 
four courses (12 credits) for work completed at 
other schools accredited by the American Assem- 
bly of Collegiate Schools of Business. Students 
who request advanced standing may be required 
to demonstrate competence by taking a placement 
examination. 

Equivalency 

Students may seek equivalencies for core courses 
through either administrative exemptions or com- 
petency examinations. Students who have com- 
pleted two or more undergraduate courses in a 
core area with a grade B or better are generally 
granted administrative exemptions. Students who 
have completed only one undergraduate course 
in a core area, or who feel that their work experi- 
ence warrants an equivalency, may take a compe- 
tency examination to demonstrate their mastery 
of the core material. Although equivalencies do 
not shorten the program, they do allow students 
to register for more elective courses. 

Grading 

In each graduate course in which a student regis- 
ters for graduate credit, he or she will receive one 
of the following grades at the end of the semes- 
ter: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C, F, W (Withdrawal from 
course), or I (Incomplete). The high passing grade 
of A is awarded for distinguished course work. 
The passing grade of B is awarded for course work 
that is clearly satisfactory at the graduate level. 
The passing grade of C is awarded for work that 
is minimally acceptable at the graduate level. The 
failing grade of F is given for work that is unsat- 
isfactory. In order to graduate, an M.B.A. or 
M.S.F. student must attain an overall average of 
B- (2.7) or higher in course work. 

No academic credit is granted for a course in 
which a student receives a grade of F. M.B.A. stu- 
dents who receive grades of C or less in five 
courses are subject to academic review and may 
be required to withdraw from the program. 
M.B.A. students who receive three or more Fs are 
automatically dropped from degree candidacy. 

M.S.F. students who receive grades of C or 
less in three courses are subject to academic re- 
view and may be required to withdraw from the 
program. M.S.F. students who receive two or 
more Fs are automatically dropped from degree 
candidacy. 

Ph.D. students should review the Ph.D. aca- 
demic manual for grading procedures. 

Scholastic Average 

For purposes of computing scholastic standing, 
numeric averages are assigned to letter grades as 
follows: A: 4.0, A-: 3.7, B+: 3.3, B: 3.0, B-:2.7, C: 
2.0, F: 0. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

No grade entry and no record of courses will ap- 
pear in permanent records for students who with- 
draw from courses within the first week of class. 
After the first week of class, and before the last 
three weeks, students may withdraw formally, 
with the permission of the Dean. W (Withdrawal 
from course) will appear on their record unless the 
Dean indicates another entry. For students who 
neglect to withdraw formally, a grade of failure 



108 • Carroll Graduate School of Management • Department Faculty Listings 



will be recorded and will enter into the computa- 
tion of the student's average. 

Course Completion 

All required work in any course must be com- 
pleted by the date set for the course examination. 
However, a deferment may be permitted at the 
discretion of the professor of the course. If a de- 
ferment is granted, the professor will determine 
its length, up to a maximum of four months from 
the end of the examination period. Deferments 
longer than four months may be granted only by 
the Dean, who will in all cases consult the pro- 
fessor of the course. If a deferment is granted, the 
student will receive a temporary grade of I (In- 
complete), which will be changed after the above- 
mentioned date. Students may not withdraw from 
courses for which they have received a deferment. 
The minimum course load for all full-time 
M.B.A. students is four courses per semester; the 
minimum for part-time M.B.A. students is two 
courses per semester. The full-time status for cer- 
tification purposes is twelve credits for all students 
in CGSOM. The maximum course load for a 
graduate student employed in a full-time position 
is three courses per semester. In some cases, ar- 
rangements may be made in writing through the 
Dean for adjustment of course loads. 

Independent Study 

A graduate student may wish to do an Indepen- 
dent Study (formally entitled "Directed Read- 
ings" or "Directed Research") in a particular area 
of interest. To qualify for this the student must 
submit a written proposal to a faculty member and 
to the Graduate Dean for approval. A student is 
allowed to take a maximum of two of these 
courses. 

Time Limit 

Students are expected to complete all require- 
ments for the M.B.A. degree within six years of 
the initial registration. All requirements for the 
M.S.F. degree must be completed within three 
years. Approved leaves of absence can be used to 
adjust this limit. 

Leave of Absence and Reinstatement 

If a student finds it necessary to interrupt his or 
her program of study, then the student should 
notify the Dean's office in writing, including rea- 
sons for the requested leave of absence and an 
anticipated date of return. The student must file 
for reinstatement six weeks prior returning to the 
program. A reinstatement decision will consider 
the student's prior academic performance, the 
length of his or her absence, current admission 
policies and enrollment figures, and changes in 
the program or degree requirements that may 
have taken place during the period of absence. 

Clearance for Good Standing 

Every student must be in good standing with 
Carroll School of Management and with the Stu- 
dent Account Office in order to be eligible for en- 
rollment in course work. Each registration, there- 
fore, will be checked to ensure that the student 
meets the following conditions: 
Academic: Must be maintaining a satisfactory aca- 
demic average; 

Administrative: Must be fulfilling prescribed ad- 
ministrative requirements; 



Financial: Must be in good standing with the Stu- 
dent Account Office. 

Student Integrity 

It is the purpose of the Carroll School of Man- 
agement to develop the whole person. Integrity 
and honesty in the performance of all assign- 
ments, both in the classroom and outside, are es- 
sential to this purpose. A student who submits 
work that is not his or her own violates the 
principle of high standards and jeopardizes his or 
her right to continue in the academic program. 

ACCOUNTING 

Arnold Wright, Anderson Professor; B.S., Univer- 
sity of Colorado; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 
Southern California. 

Jeffrey R. Cohen, Associate Professor; Chairperson 
of the Department; B.S., Bar Ilan University; 
M.B.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst; CM. A. 

Louis Corsini, Associate Professor; B.S.B.A., 
M.B.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University; C.P.A., Massachusetts 

Ronald Pawliczek, Associate Professor; B.B.A., 
Siena College; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 

Massachusetts 

Kenneth B. Schwartz, Associate Professor; B.S., 
M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University 

Progyan Basu, Assistant Professor; B.E., Jadavpur 
University, India; M.B.A., University of Missouri, 
Kansas City; Ph.D.(cand.), University of 
Nebraska, Lincoln 

Stanley J. Dmohowski, Assistant Professor; 
B.S.B.A., Boston College; M.B.A., New York 
University; C.P.A., Massachusetts 

Elaine M. Harwood, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
M.B.A., California State Polytechnic University; 
Ph.D., University of Southern California 

Gil J. Manzon, Assistant Professor; B.S., Bentley 
College; D.B.A., Boston University 

Thomas Porter, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
University of Maryland; M.S.M., Georgia Institute 
ofTechnology; Ph.D., University of Washington 

Billy Soo, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of 
Philippines; M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern 
University 

Gregory Trompeter, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
Illinois State University; M.B.A., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 

Gerald Holtz, Lecturer; A.B., Colby College; 
M.B.A., Harvard University 

Ganesh Krisnamoorthy, Instructor; B.C., M.C., 
University of Delhi; M.A., Bowling Green State; 
Ph.D. (cand.), University of Southern California 

BUSINESS LAW 

Frank J. Parker, S.J., Professor; B.S., College of 
the Holy Cross; J.D., Fordham University Law 
School; M.Th., Louvain University 

David P. Twomey, Professor; Chairperson of the 
Department; B.S., J.D., Boston College; M.B.A., 
University of Massachusetts 



Alfred E. Sutherland, Associate Professor; B.S., 
A.M., J.D., Boston College 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Peter G. Clote, Professor; B.S., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 
University 

Howard Straubing, Professor; A.B., University of 
Mchigan; Ph.D., University of California at 
Berkeley 

James Gips, Associate Professor; B . S . , Massachusetts 
Institute ofTechnology; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford 
University 

Peter Kugel, Associate Professor; A.B., Colgate 
University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Michael C. McFarland, S.J., Associate Professor; 
Chairperson of the Department; A.B., Cornell 
University; TH.M., M.Div., Weston School of 
Theology; M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon 
University 

C. Peter Olivieri, Associate Professor; B.S.B.A., 
M.B.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Columbia 
University 

Edward Sciore Associate Professor; B.S., Yale 
University; M.S.E., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Robert P. Signorile, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
Queens College; M.S., New York University; 
M.S., Ph.D., Polytechnic University 

FINANCE 

Francis B. Campanella, Professor; B.S. Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute; M.B.A., Babson College; 
D.B.A., Harvard University 

Edward J. Kane, Chary Professor; B.S., 
Georgetown University; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute ofTechnology 

Alan Marcus, Professor; B.A., Wesleyan 
University; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Mya Maung, Professor; A.B., Rangoon University; 
A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Catholic 
University 

Robert Taggart, Professor; Chairperson of the 
Department; B.A.,AmherstCollege;M.S., Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology 

Hassan Tehranian, Professor; B.S., Iranian 
Institute of Advanced Accounting;M.B.A., Ph.D., 
University of Alabama 

Sheridan Tirman, John L. Collins S.J. , Professor; 
Chair in International Finance; B.S. , University 
of Colorado; M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon 
University 

George A. Aragon, Associate Professor; A.B., 
University of California at Los Angeles; D.B.A., 
Harvard University 

Elizabeth Strock Bagnani, Associate Professor; 
B.B.A., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst 

Laurence M. Benviniste, Associate Professor; B.S., 
University of California, Irvine; Ph.D., University 
of California, Berkeley 



Carroll Graduate School of Management • Department Faculty Listings • 109 



Clifford G. Holderness, Associate Professor; A.B., 
J.D., Stanford University; M.Sc, London School 
of Economics 

John G. Preston, Associate Professor; B.A.Sc, 
University of British Columbia; M.B.A., Western 
Ontario; D.B.A, Harvard University 

Nickolaos G. Travlos, Associate Professor; B.S., 
University of Athens, Greece; M.B.A., M.Phil., 
Ph.D., New York University 

William J. Wilhelm, Associate Professor; B.B.A., 
M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University 

V. Ravi Anshu man, Assistant Professor; B. Tech., 
Indian Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University 
of Utah 

Edith Hotchkiss, Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Dartmouth; Ph.D., New York University 

Timothy S. Mech, Assistant Professor; B.A., Indi- 
ana State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Rochester 

Hamid Mehran, Assistant Professor; B.A., Gilan 
College of Management; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

MARKETING 

Victoria L. Crittenden, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Arkansas College; M.B.A, University of Arkansas; 
D.B.A., Harvard University 

John T. Hasenjaeger, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Bradley University; M.S., Southern Illinois 
University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

RaymondF. Keyes, Associate Professor; AB., Colby 
College; M.B.A., Boston College 

Michael P. Peters, Associate Professor; Chairperson 
of the Department; B.S., M.B.A., Northeastern 
University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Ingrid Martin, Assistant Professor; B . A. , University 
of New Mexico; M.A., Michigan State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Southern California- 
Los Angeles 

Jean Romeo, Assistant Professor; B.S., Bucknell 
University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst 

Martin Roth, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Albert H. Segars, Assistant Professor; B.A,M.BA, 
University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University 
of South Carolina 

Gerald E. Smith, Assistant Professor; B.A, Brandeis 
University; M.B.A., Harvard University; D.B.A., 
Boston University 

Ram as warn y Venkatesh, Instructor; B.E., 
University of Madras, India; M.B.A., Indian 
Institute of Management, India; Ph.D. (cand.), 
University of Texas-Austin 

Eugene Bron stein, Lecturer; A.B., Dartmouth 
College; M.B.A., Harvard University 



ORGANIZATION STUDIES— HUMAN 
RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 

Jean M. Bartunek, R.S.C.J., Professor; 
Chairperson of the Department; A.B., Maryville 
College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois at 
Chicago 

William R. Torbert, Professor; B.A., Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Dalmar Fisher, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Northwestern University; M.B.A., Boston 
College; D.B.A., Harvard University 

Judith Gordon, Associate Professor; A.B., Brandeis 
University; M.Ed., Boston University; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

John W. Lewis, TH, Associate Professor; A.B., 
Ohio Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Case Western 
Reserve University 

Richard P. Nielsen, Associate Professor; B.S., M.A., 
University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University 

William Stevenson, Associate Professor; B.S., 
University of Maryland; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of California 

Judith Clair, Assistant Professor; B.A., University 
of California; Ph.D., University of Southern 
California 

Candace Jones, Assistant Professor; B.A., Smith 
College; M.H.R.M., Ph.D., University of Utah 

Anthony DiBella, Visiting Assistant Professor; B.A., 
Trinity College; M.A. American University; 
B.B.A. University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

W.E. Douglas Creed, Instructor; B.A., M.A, 
Yale Divinity School; Ph.D. (cand.), University of 
California, Berkeley 

OPERATIONS AND STRATEGIC 
MANAGEMENT 

Walter H. Klein, Professor Emeritus; B.S., M.B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburg 

Joseph A. Raelin, Professor; A.B., Ed.M., Tufts 
University; C.A.G.S., Boston University; Ph.D., 
SUNY, Buffalo 

Jeffrey L. Ringuest, Professor; Chairperson of 
the Department; B.S., Roger Williams College; 
M.S., Ph.D., Clemson University 

Larry P. Ritzman, Galligan Professor; B.S., M.B.A, 
University of Akron; D.B.A., Michigan State 
University 

John E. Van Tassel, Professor; B.S., B.A., A.M., 
Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Samuel B. Graves, Associate Professor; B.S., U.S. 
Air Force Academy; M.S., D.B.A., George 
Washington University 

Hassell McClellan, Associate Professor; B.A., Fisk 
University; M.B.A., University of Chicago, 
D.B.A., Harvard University 

David C. Murphy, Associate Professor; B.B.S., 
New Hampshire College;M.B.A.,D.B.A, Indiana 
University 



M. Hossein Safi zadeh , Associate Professor; B .B . A. , 
Iran Institute of Banking; M.B.A, Ph.D., Okla- 
homa State University 

Sandra A. Waddock, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Northeastern University; M.A., Boston College; 
M.B.A., D.B.A., Boston University 

Randolph H. Case, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
University of Virginia; M.B.A., Columbia 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Catherine S. Lerme, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
Lycee Michel Montaigne, France; M.S., Ecole 
Nationale Superieore De Chimie, France; M.B.A, 
Ph.D. (cand.), University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst 

Albert H. Segars, Assistant Professor; B.A, M.B.A, 
University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University 
of South Carolina 

Charles E. Downing, Instructor, B.A, M.S., Ph.D. 

(cand.), Northwestern University 

Lawrence Halpern, Lecturer; B.A., Harvard 
University; M.B.A., Columbia University 

David R. McKenna, Lecturer; B.S., M.B.A., 
Boston College 



1 10 • Graduate School of Nursing • Faculty 



Graduate School of Nursing 



FACULTY 

Mary Elizabeth Duffy, Professor; B.S.N., 
Villanova University; M.S. Rutgers University; 
Ph.D., New York University 

Laurel A. Eisenhauer, Professor; B.S., Boston 
College; M.S.N. University of Pennsylvania; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Marjory Gordon, Professor; B.S., M.S., Hunter 
College, CUNY; Ph.D., Boston College 

Carol R. Hartman, Professor; B.S., M.S., 
University of California, LosAngeles; C.N.Sc, 
Boston University 

Joellen W. Hawkins, Professor; B.S.N., 
Northwestern University; M.S., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Susan J. Kelley, Professor; B.S., M.S., Boston 
University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Barbara H. Munro, Professor and Dean, B.S., 
M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Callista Roy, C.S J., Professor; B.A., Mount Saint 
Mary's College; M.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of 
California, Los Angeles 

Miriam-Gayle Wardle, Professor; B.S., University 
of Pittsburgh; M.S., Boston University; Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University 

Karen J. Aroian, Associate Professor; B.S.N., 
University of Massachusetts; M.S., Boston 
College; Ph.D., University of Washington 

Jane E. Ashley, A ssociat e Professor; B.S., California 
State University; M.S., Ph.D., Boston College 

EvelynL. Barbee, Associate Professor; B.S., Ed.M., 
Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Washington 

Pamela J. Burke, Associate Professor; B.S., Boston 
College; M.S., Boston University; Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Sarah Cimino, Associate Professor; B.S.N., 
University of California, Los Angeles; M.S., 
Boston College 

Mary Ellen Ooona,Associate Professor;B.S., M.S., 
Boston College; Ed. D., Boston University 

Joyce Dwyer, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., 
Boston College; M.P.H., Harvard School of Public 
Health 

Nancy Fairchild, Associate Professor; B.S., Boston 
University; M.S., University of Rochester; Ph.D., 
Boston College 

Nancy J. Gaspard, Associate Professor; B.S., Boston 
University; M.Ed., University of Florida; M.P.H., 
Dr. P.H., University of California, Los Angeles 

Lois Haggerty, Associat e Professor; B.S., Simmons 
College; M.S., Ph.D., Boston College 

Patricia B. Harrington, Associate Professor; B.S., 
University of Massachusetts; M.Ed., Boston 
University 



Loretta P. Higgins, Associate Professor and 
Undergraduate Associate Dean; B.S., M.S., Ed.D., 
Boston College 

June Andrews Horowitz, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Boston College; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., 
New York University 

Bernadette P. Hungler, Associate Professor; 
B.S.N., Georgetown University, M.A., 
Northeastern University; M.S., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Dorothy A. Jones, Associate Professor; B.S.N., 
Long Island University; M.S.N., Indiana 
University; Ed.D., Boston University 

Rosemary Krawczyk, Associate Professor; B.S.N., 
College of St. Catherine; M.S., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Ronna Krozy, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., 
Boston College; Ed.D., Boston University 

Ellen Mahoney, Associate Professor; B.S.N., 
Georgetown University; M.S.N., University of 
Pennsylvania; D.N.S., University of California, 
San Francisco 

Cathy Malek, Associate Professor; B.S., University 
of Wisconsin; M.S., Ph.D., Boston College 

Carol L. Mandle, Associate Professor; B.S.N., 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 
Boston College 

Nancy C. McCarthy, Associate Professor and 
Associate Graduate Dean; B.S., Boston College; 
M.S., Ed.D., Boston University 

Sandra Mott, Associate Professor; B.S., Wheaton 
College; M.S., Ph.D. (cand.), Boston College 

Catherine P. Murphy, Associate Professor; B.S., 
Columbia University; M.S., Hunter College, 
C.U.N. Y.; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Margaret A. Murphy, Associate Professor; B.S., 
St. Joseph College; M.A., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Rita Otivieri, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 
Boston College 

Jean A. O'Neil, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., 
Boston College; Ed.D., Boston University 

Frances Ouellette, Associate Professor; B.S.N., 
Salem State College; M.S., Ph.D., Boston College 

Eileen J. Plunkett, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., 
Ph.D., Boston College 

Sally H. Rankin, Associate Professor; B.A., Boston 
University; B.S.N., California State University; 
M.S.N., Duke University; Ph.D. University of 
California 

Rachel E. Spector, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., 
Boston College; Ph. D., University of Texas, Austin 

Deborah Adams, Assistant Professor; B.S.N. 
University of Virginia; M.S.N., University of 
North Carolina; Ph.D., University of California 



Phyllis Beveridge, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
University of Cincinnati; M.S., Ed.D., Columbia 
University 

Susan Chase, Assistant Professor; B.S., Columbia 
University; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., 
Harvard University 

Rose Mary L. Harvey, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
University of Wisconsin; M.A., New York 
University; D.N.Sc, Catholic University 

Margaret Kearney, Assistant Professor; A.B., 
Marlboro College; B.S.N., Columbia University; 
M.Ed., Plymouth State College; M.S., Boston 
College; Ph.D., University of California 

Diane Maloney, Assistant Professor; B.S., Boston 
College, M.S., University of Lowell; Ph.D., 
Brandeis University 

Ellen McFadden, Assistant Professor; B.S., 
University of Virginia; M.S., Ph.D.., University 
ofMaryland 

Anne Norris, Assistant Professor; B.S., Michigan 
State University; B.S.N. , Rush University ; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 

Judith Shindul-Rothchild, Assistant Professor; 
B.S., Boston College, M.S.N., Yale University; 
Ph.D., Boston College 



Graduate School of Nursing • Doctor of Philosophy Degree Program with a Major in Nursing • ill 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing in its quest for excellence 
and influence offers a Master of Science degree 
program and a Doctor of Philosophy degree pro- 
gram for qualified nurses who seek advanced study 
in nursing as preparation for clinical research and 
clinical leadership. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 
PROGRAM WITH A MAJOR IN 
NURSING 

The Ph.D. Program in Nursing is a post-Master's 
research-oriented degree. The focus of this pro- 
gram is on preparation for leadership roles in 
nursing, especially in clinical nursing research. 
Areas of concentration include ethics, ethical 
judgment and decision making, nursing diagno- 
sis and diagnostic/therapeutic judgment, and life 
processes/selected human response patterns in 
health and illness. The program offers a variety 
of learning opportunities through course work, 
interdisciplinary colloquia, independent study, 
and clinical research practica. Policies and proce- 
dures are consistent with those of the Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences. Program planning 
is determined according to the individual's back- 
ground, research interests, and stage of develop- 
ment in scholarly activities. Low student-faculty 
ratios and a research mentorship permit students 
to complete the program in the minimal amount 
of time. Multiple resources for scholarly develop- 
ment are available within the University and in the 
research and clinical nursing centers of the 
Greater Boston area. 

The three year plan allows the student to take 
ten credits of coursework per semester for the first 
two years of study before entering the disserta- 
tion phase of the program. 

Students in the four year plan take six to seven 
credits of coursework per semester for the first 
three years of study prior to beginning the disser- 
tation phase of the program. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The curriculum of the program includes three 
core areas of study: knowledge development in 
nursing, substantive nursing content, and research 
methods. The knowledge development compo- 
nent includes courses in philosophy of science, 
epistemology of nursing, and strategies for devel- 
oping nursing knowledge. Substantive nursing 
content is acquired through the study of concepts 
(becoming, life process, health); programs of re- 
search (uncertainty, sensory preparation, etc.) and 
processes (ethical and diagnostic and therapeutic 
judgment). The research component of the pro- 
gram includes qualitative and quantitative re- 
search methods, statistics, clinical research, re- 
search practica and dissertation advisement. Rel- 
evant cognate courses are required for each cho- 
sen area of research concentration in addition to 
the core areas of study. 

Forty-six credits are the minimum for meet- 
ing the degree requirements. Student background 
and interest may require additional credits. 

• NU 701 Epistemology of Nursing 3 credits 

• NU 702 Strategies for Knowledge 
Development 3 credits 



• PL 593 Philosophy of Science 3 credits 

• NU 7 1 Themes of Inquiry I: 

Clinical Topics 3 credits 

• NU 7 1 1 Themes of Inquiry II: 

Clinical Judgment 3 credits 

• NU 820 Expanding Paradigms 

for Nursing Research 3 credits 

• NU 82 1 Nursing Research and Health 

Policy Formulation 3 credits 

• Quantitative/Qualitative Methods 

of Research 3 credits 

• Statistics/Computer Application and 

Analysis of Data 3 credits 

• Measurement/Norm & Criterion- 
References Data 3 credits 

• Advanced Qualitative/Quantitative 

Methods 3 credits 

• NU 810 Research Practicum I 1 credit 

• NU 81 1 Research Practicum II 1 credit 

• NU 812 Research Practicum III 1 credit 

• NU 813 Research Practicum IV 1 credit 

• Cognate 3 credits 

• NU 998 Doctoral Comprehensives credits 

• NU 901 Dissertation Advisement 3 credits 

• NU 902 Dissertation Advisement 3 credits 

• NU 999 Doctoral Continuation credits 
TOTAL 46 credits 

Cognates are related to research concentra- 
tion/methods. The number of credits in cognates 
is based on need and prior educational back- 
ground and coursework. 

Ph.D. Colloquium 

Monthly seminar for doctoral students on vari- 
ous topics of nursing research. Content is based 
on student needs and interests. 

Doctoral Student Research 
Development Day 

Two annual seminars for the first and second year 
doctoral students to present their research. 

Career Opportunities 

Graduates of the program may seek positions in 
academic, industrial, government, or nursing 
practice settings where clinical nursing research 
is conducted. They are also prepared to begin a 
program of research through post-doctoral work. 

Admission Requirements 

• Official transcript of Bachelor's and Master's 
degrees from programs accredited by the Na- 
tional League for Nursing 

• Current RN license 

• Current curriculum vitae 

• Written statement of career goals that includes 
research interests (maximum 1500 words) 

• Three letters of reference, preferably from 
doctorally prepared academic and service person- 
nel, at least two of whom should be professional 
nurses 

• Evidence of scholarship in the form of a pub- 
lished article, a clinical research study, a thesis or 
a term paper 

•Official report of the Graduate Record Exami- 
nation Scores taken within five years 

• Application form with application fee 

• Qualified applicants will be invited for pre-ad- 
mission interview with faculty. Pre-application 
inquiries are welcomed. 



Applications are reviewed after all credentials 
are received. The deadline for receipt of all cre- 
dentials is January 3 1 of the year of admission to 
the program. 

Application materials may be requested from 
the Graduate School of Nursing, 617-552-4250. 

Financial Aid 

There are four major sources of funding for full- 
time students in the doctoral program in nursing 
at Boston College: (1) University Fellowships are 
awarded to five students per year on a competi- 
tive basis. Full tuition and a stipend are provided 
for three years as long as the student maintains 
good academic standing and demonstrates 
progress towards the Ph.D. Degree. (2) The 
highly competitive National Research Service 
Award for Individuals provides federal monies to 
cover tuition and a stipend. (3) Graduate assistant- 
ships that consist of a stipend provided by Bos- 
ton College. (4) Research Associate positions as 
provided through faculty research grants. Addi- 
tional grants and scholarship opportunities are 
available on an individual basis. 

Language Requirement 

Students must demonstrate proficiency in at least 
one language other than English or complete the 
Computer Literacy Competency Examination. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

A student in good academic standing (no 
incompletes in required courses allowed) may take 
the comprehensive exam during or after the last 
semester of courses. The following grading scale 
is used: pass with distinction (PwD), pass (P), and 
fail (F); one of these three grades will be recorded 
on the student's transcript. Within two weeks, the 
department will send the results in writing to the 
Registrar's Office and to the individual student. 
A student who fails the doctoral comprehensive 
examination may take it once again not sooner 
than the following semester and at a time desig- 
nated by the department. In case of a second fail- 
ure, no further attempt is allowed. 

Students should register for Doctoral 
Comprehensives 998 which includes tuition for 
one credit the registration and activity fees. If the 
student is not taking courses in the semester of 
the comprehensive examination there will be a 
one credit fee in addition to a registration and 
activity fee. No credit is granted. 

Admission to Candidacy 

A student attains the status of a doctoral candi- 
date by passing the doctoral comprehensive ex- 
amination and by satisfying all departmental re- 
quirements except the dissertation. Doctoral can- 
didates are required to register each semester and 
to pay a doctoral continuation fee until comple- 
tion of the dissertation. 

Dissertation 

Each doctoral candidate is required to complete 
a dissertation that embodies original and indepen- 
dent research and demonstrates advanced schol- 
arly achievement. As soon as possible after a 
student's admission to candidacy and during or 
before enrollment in Dissertation Advisement, 
NU 901 and NU 902, the student forms a disser- 
tation committee. The committee is formed at the 
initiative of the student. 



112 • Graduate School of Nursing • Master ok Science Degree Program with a Major in Nursing 



The dissertation committee consists of a mini- 
mum of three members. Two shall be chosen 
from the faculty of the School of Nursing; the 
third member may be a member of the faculty of 
another school within the University or an appro- 
priate doctoral prepared person outside the Uni- 
versity. The Chairperson and committee are cho- 
sen by the student, approved by his/her advisor, 
and then formally appointed by the Associate 
Dean of the Graduate Programs in the School of 
Nursing. 

The dissertation shall be defended by the can- 
didate in a public oral examination. The official 
approval of the dissertation committee is required. 
Committee members certify their acceptance by 
signing the title page of the dissertation. Two 
signed copies of the dissertation, one original and 
one clear copy, should be filed in the Graduate 
School Nursing. The submitted dissertation be- 
comes the property of Boston College, but the 
University does not limit the author's right to 
publish the results. 

The Boston College School of Nursing Doc- 
toral Student's Handbook further describes the 
requirements for taking the language competency 
examination, the comprehensive examination and 
the dissertation and should be obtained from the 
Office of the Associate Dean of Graduate Pro- 
grams in Cushing 202. 

Time Limit 

All requirements for the Doctoral degree must be 
completed within eight consecutive years from 
the beginning of the doctoral studies. Extensions 
beyond this limit may be made only with depart- 
mental recommendation and the approval of the 
Dean. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE 
PROGRAM WITH A MAJOR IN 
NURSING 

The main objective of the Master of Science 
Degree Program with a major in nursing at Bos- 
ton College is to prepare nurses in advanced prac- 
tice including clinical specialist and nurse practi- 
tioner. There are four areas of clinical specializa- 
tion in nursing at Boston College: Adult Health, 
Community Health, Maternal Child Health, and 
Psychiatric Mental Health. The focus in the spe- 
cialty areas is on the human response to actual or 
potential health problems. The approach to cli- 
ents is multi-faceted and includes the develop- 
ment of advanced competencies in nursing diag- 
nosis and therapeutic judgment. The graduate of 
the Master's Program, in addition to giving spe- 
cialized direct care, provides leadership in the 
development of nursing. Through complex deci- 
sion-making processes, indirect services such as 
staff development, consultation, middle manage- 
ment, and participation in research, the advanced 
practitioner, clinical nurse specialist and nurse 
practitioner, improve the quality of nursing prac- 
tice. 

Areas of Clinical Specialization in 
Nursing 

Adult Health Nursing 

The curriculum in adult health nursing enables 
students to develop competencies in advanced 
nursing practice, clinical research, and strategies 



for improving the quality of care. Learning expe- 
riences are developed from concepts of holistic 
care, optimal health, and functional health pat- 
terns of the adult. The curriculum prepares for 
advanced practice including clinical nurse special- 
ist and nurse practitioner for various roles in 
health care delivery and provides the base for 
doctoral study. 

Students select a focus for practice and re- 
search from a variety of adult health practice ar- 
eas. Individual guidance is provided by faculty 
experts in collaboration with master's prepared 
clinical specialists and nurse practitioner in pri- 
mary, acute, and long-term care. 

Community Health Nursing 

The curriculum for community health nursing is 
designed to provide students the opportunity to 
apply theories and modalities of treatment in 
community health nursing and to meet the health 
needs of families, populations or other defined 
community groups. The major foci of the pro- 
gram are (1) health promotion and disease pre- 
vention strategies in high risk aggregates, and (2) 
the management of common and episodic health 
concerns of individuals and families. Emphasis is 
on clinical specialization and the family nurse 
practitioner within the context of a changing 
health care system. Clinical practica are selected 
to meet the auricular and students' objectives and 
goals. The practicum is directed towards the ap- 
plication and integration of theoretical knowledge 
in health departments, neighborhood health cen- 
ters, visiting nurse associations and other commu- 
nity settings. 

Maternal Child Health Nursing 

The curriculum in maternal child health nursing 
focuses on the preparation of candidates for ex- 
panded roles in women's health and the care of 
children. The curriculum prepares students for 
advanced practice in women's health and care, as 
well as pediatric ambulatory or acute/chronic 
care. It includes the expansion of clinical practice 
responsibilities and the development of the 
teacher, researcher, change agent, leader, and li- 
aison roles of the advanced practitioner. A vari- 
ety of clinical agencies are used to meet the 
student's specific goals and objectives and to pro- 
vide for application and integration of theoreti- 
cal knowledge and exploration of direct and in- 
direct role components. The program prepares 
graduates to sit for the appropriate ANA or 
NAACOG certification exams for advanced prac- 
tice. 

Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing 

The curriculum aims at developing clinical com- 
petencies for nursing practice in the psychiatric 
mental health field. Theoretical frameworks for 
practice are derived from the fields of education, 
social and biological sciences, and psychiatric 
nursing. The program focuses on advanced prac- 
tice including clinical nurse specialist and nurse 
practitioner roles in underserved urban and high 
risk areas, including treatment of severely dis- 
turbed clients. Emphasis is placed on evaluation 
of practice methods with individuals, groups, and 
families in the community and institutional set- 
tings. Clinical placements in outpatient commu- 
nity mental health centers and selected inpatient 
and day hospital settings are used to meet student 



and curriculum goals. Client assessment, psycho- 
therapeutic intervention and case management 
are emphasized as direct role activities. The in- 
direct role of the Clinical Specialist is addressed 
in relation to mental health consultation, super- 
vision and programming. 

Cooperating Health Agencies 

Practice settings available in the city of Boston and 
the greater metropolitan area offer rich experi- 
ences for developing advanced competencies in 
the nursing specialty. Selected major teaching 
hospitals used are the following: Massachusetts 
General, Beth Israel, McLean, Brigham and 
Women's, New England Deaconess, Boston City, 
Children's and Newton- Wellesley. Community 
agencies include the following: mental health cen- 
ters, general health centers, college health clin- 
ics, public health departments, visiting nurse as- 
sociations, health maintenance organizations, 
nurses in private practice, and home care agen- 
cies. 

Career Opportunities 

Recent graduates from the Boston College 
Master's Program are in the traditional and non- 
traditional leadership roles: occupational health, 
politics, consultation, health care planning, direc- 
tors of home health agencies, private practice, and 
government service. 

Program Options 

The program is designed for registered nurses 
who have a baccalaureate degree from a National 
League of Nursing (NLN) accredited nursing 
program and who have had at least one year of ex- 
perience in nursing practice. 

The full-time option is a one-year program 
comprising thirty-seven credits. The program of 
study includes nine credits of electives, twelve 
credits of core courses, and sixteen credits of spe- 
cialty and theory clinical practicum. 

The part-time option can be completed in one 
and a half to five years, is also thirty-seven cred- 
its, and is identical to the full-time program of 
study. Students take electives and core courses 
prior to or concurrently with specialty courses. 
On admission, part-time students design an indi- 
vidualized program of study with a faculty advi- 
sor. 

The R.N. /Masters Plan is an innovative 
means of facilitating advanced professional edu- 
cation for highly qualified nurses. The plan, predi- 
cated on adult learning principles, recognizes and 
maximizes students' prior educational achieve- 
ment. It is designed for R.N.s who hold either an 
Associate Degree in Nursing, a nursing diploma 
or another non-nursing undergraduate or gradu- 
ate degree. Credit may be received by direct trans- 
fer, exemption exam, mobility profde or actual 
course enrollment. The R.N. Advisor will inter- 
view the applicant, complete a thorough assess- 
ment of credentials and develop an individualized 
course of study. The length of the program will 
vary with each individual's background. 

The M.S./M.B.A .Joint Degree is a combined 
program for the education of advanced practice 
including clinical nurse specialist and nurse prac- 
titioner in the nursing masters program and busi- 
ness administration in the Wallace E. Carroll 
School of Management for individuals interested 
in the nurse executive position. Students work 



Graduate School of Nursing • Master of Science Degree Program with a Major in Nursing • 113 



toward completion of both degree requirements 
concurrently or in sequence. Through the over- 
lap of electives that would meet the requirements 
of both programs, the total number of credits for 
both degrees can be reduced. Faculty advisors 
work with students in designing a plan of full time 
or part time study. 

The Additional Specialty Concentration op- 
tion is designed for registered nurses who have a 
Master's degree in nursing, and who wish to en- 
hance their educational background in an addi- 
tional specialty area. This is a non-degree pro- 
gram of study, individually designed by the stu- 
dent and faculty advisor to meet career goals. 

Students not seeking a degree, but interested 
in pursuing course work at the graduate level, may 
apply for admission as special students. Admission 
as special student does not guarantee subsequent 
admission for degree candidacy. Individuals who 
are admitted as special students and who subse- 
quently wish to apply for admission as degree can- 
didates must file additional application documents 
and be accepted for degree study. No more than 
twelve credits may be taken as a special student 
before matriculation into the program. Applica- 
tion deadlines are six weeks before the semester 
of entrance. 

Admission Requirements for Master of 
Science Degree (full time and part 
time) 

• Baccalaureate degree from an NLN accredited 
program with a major in nursing 

• An undergraduate scholastic average of B or 
better 

• Official report of scores on the Graduate Record 
Examination, taken within 5 years 

• Three letters of recommendation pertaining to 
academic ability and professional competency 

• Statement of goals, maximum 250 words, per- 
taining to career objectives and how your in- 
tended specialty program will help you attain 
them 

• A completed undergraduate course in statistics 

• Documentation of successful completion of an 
undergraduate or continuing education course in 
health assessment 

• A personal interview with faculty (telephone and 
written interviews are utilized if distance pre- 
cludes a personal meeting) 

• Applicants must hold a current license to prac- 
tice nursing in Massachusetts and have at least one 
year of work experience 

• Immunizations and physical examination are 
required 

• Individual coverage by professional liability in- 
surance is mandatory for all clinical students 

Admission Requirements for RN/MS Plan: 

• Massachusetts RN license 

• One year professional nursing experience 

• Scholastic average of B or better 

• Official transcripts of all post-secondary 
coursework 

• Official report of the GRE scores, taken within 
five years 

• NLN Mobility Profile II 

• 3 letters of reference 

• Statement of goals 

• Undergraduate statistics 

• Health assessment course 



• Personal interview 

• Liability insurance, physical examination and 
required immunizations 

Admission Requirements for M.S./M.B.A. 
Joint Degree: 

• Official baccalaureate transcripts from NLN 
accredited institutions 

• 3 letters of reference 

• 2 essay questions and statement of goals 

• Resume 

• Minimum 1 year of nursing management expe- 
rience 

• Undergraduate statistics 

• Health assessment course 

• Official report of the GRE scores, taken within 
5 years 

• Personal interview 

Admission Requirements for Additional 
Specialty Concentration: 

• Form 1 and Form 2 of Boston College Gradu- 
ate School of Nursing application, indicating non- 
degree status, and application fee 

• Baccalaureate and Master's degree transcripts 
from NLN accredited programs 

• Three letters of recommendation pertaining to 
current professional competency 

• Personal interview with specialty faculty 

• Current Massachusetts R.N. licensure 

• Documentation of adequate individual cover- 
age by professional liability insurance 

• Physical examination and immunizations 

• Program of study approved by specialty faculty 
and by the Associate Dean of Graduate Programs 
(NB: All courses toward a program of study must 
be taken at Boston College.) The applicant is re- 
sponsible for meeting ANA credentials for certi- 
fication. 

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis for 
both part-time and full-time study. 

Application deadlines are as follows: 
Full and part-time May/June: February 15 
Part-time September: May 1 5 
Part-time January: October 15 

The Dean of the Graduate School of Nurs- 
ing forwards the offficial announcement of accep- 
tance or rejection. 

Program of Study 

Master of Science with a Major in Nursing 

• Electives or Independent Study* 9 credits 

• NU 515 Nursing Knowledge 

Development 2 credits 

• NU 516 Clinical Judgment 2 credits 

• NU 5 1 7 Role Implementation 2 credits 

• NU 520 Research Theory 3 credits 
Options following NU 520, choose one 

• NU 523 Computer Data Analysis 3 credits* 

• NU 524 Masters Research Practicum 3 credits* 

• NU 525 Integrated Review of 

Nursing Research 3 credits* 

• 2 Specialty Theory Courses 6 credits 

• 2 Specialty Practice Courses 10 credits 
TOTAL 37 credits 
*Optional, following 6 credits of research 

• NU 801 Masters Thesis 3 credits 



Nine credits of electives or independent study can 
be completed in summer, fall, and spring semes- 
ters. The elective courses must be at the graduate 
level and may be taken in any department 
or used as a specialty requirement, e.g. 
Pharmacotherapeutic and Advanced Nursing 
Practice, Physiological Life Processes, etc. Inde- 
pendent Study is recommended for students who 
have a particular interest that is not addressed in 
required courses in the curriculum. 

Master's Comprehensive Examination 

The candidate for a Master's degree must pass a 
departmental comprehensive examination that 
may be oral, written, or both, as determined by 
the department. Each candidate should consult 
his or her major department to learn the time and 
nature of the comprehensive examination. Reg- 
istration for comprehensives will take place di- 
rectly with the individual departments. Questions 
on the nature and exact date of examinations 
should be directed to the Department Chairper- 
son or Graduate Program Director. The follow- 
ing grading scale is used: pass with distinction 
(PwD), pass (P), and fail (F). Generally, within two 
weeks, notification of examination results will be 
sent in writing to the Registrar's Office. 

A candidate who fails the Master's Compre- 
hensive Examination may take it only one more 
time. Students who have completed their course 
work should register for Master's Interim Study 
(888) each semester until they complete their 
comprehensive examinations. Only the registra- 
tion fee and the activity fee are charged during this 
period. No credit is granted. 

Thesis 

The Master's program allows the student the 
option of a thesis. It is the responsibility of the 
student to become familiar with the regulations 
and procedures. All students need to have com- 
pleted 3 credits of Research Theory and com- 
pleted or taking concurrently one of the research 
options in pursuing the thesis. Comprehensive 
examinations and all course work must be passed 
before the final thesis defense. The Thesis is su- 
pervised by a faculty research advisor and at least 
one other reader. Students who have not com- 
pleted the thesis in NU 801 must register each 
semester for Thesis Direction 802, a non credit 
course, until the thesis is completed. 

Two typed copies of the thesis, one original 
and one clear copy, approved and signed by the 
faculty research advisor and reader, must be sub- 
mitted to the Graduate School Office, accompa- 
nied by the proper binding and microfilm fee, no 
later than the date specified in the academic cal- 
endar. 

The submitted thesis becomes the property of 
Boston College but the University does not limit 
the author's right to publish the results. 

Time Limit 

The student is permitted/rw consecutive years from 
the date of acceptance into the program for 
completion of all requirements for the Master's 
degree. Extensions are permitted only with 
approval of the department concerned and of the 
Dean. 

Laboratory Fee 

The laboratory fee for each clinical course will be 
paid in advance of registration as a deposit for a 



114* Graduate School of Nursing • General Information 



clinical agency placement. A survey will be mailed 
to students in February to solicit clinical place- 
ment plans. The laboratory fee will be paid to the 
School of Nursing with an affirmative intention 
to register for clinical. The amount will be cred- 
ited in full to the individual's student account. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Accreditation 

The Master of Science Degree Program is accred- 
ited by the National League for Nursing. 

Certification 

Graduates of the Master's Program are eligible to 
apply for certification by the American Nurses' 
Association in their area of specialization. Gradu- 
ates of the Women's Health nursing curriculum 
are eligible to apply to the NAACOG Certifica- 
tion Program. 

Financial Aid 

Applicants and students should refer to the School 
of Nursing's "Financial Aid-Identifying Sources 
and Making Application" packet. Please refer to 
the Financial Aid section of this Catalog for ad- 
ditional information regarding nursing scholar- 
ships and other financial aid information. 

Grades 

Complete grading information is available in the 
University section of this catalog. In theGraduate 
School of Nursing a student who receives a grade 
of C in more than 10 or F in more than 8 semes- 
ter hours of course work may be required to with- 
draw from the School. 

Leave of Absence 

Master students who do not register for course 
work, Thesis Direction or Master's Interim Study 
in any given semester must request a leave of ab- 
sence for that semester. Leaves of absence are not 
usually granted for more than 2 semesters at a 
time. Students may obtain the Leave of Absence 
Form from the Dean's Office and submit it for the 
Dean's approval. 

Leave time will normally be considered a por- 
tion of the total time limit for the degree unless 
the contrary is decided upon initially between the 
student and the Dean. Students must file the re 
admission form with the Dean's Office and pay 
the re-admission fee at least 6 weeks prior to the 
semester in which they expect to re-enroll. 

The conditions for leaves of absence and re- 
admission as noted for the Master's Program are 
also applicable to the Doctoral Program. Leaves 
of absence for students on Doctoral Continuation 
are rarely granted. 

Transfer of Credit 

Students who have completed one full semester 
of graduate work at Boston College may request 
transfer of not more than six graduate credits 
earned elsewhere. Only courses in which a student 
has received a grade of B or better, and which have 
not been applied to a prior degree, will be ac- 
cepted. Credit received for courses completed 
more than ten years prior to a student's admission 
to his or her current degree program are not ac- 
ceptable for transfer. Transfer of Credit forms, 
which are available in the University Registrar's 
Office, should be submitted, together with an 
official transcript, directly to the Associate Dean 



for approval. If approved, the transfer course and 
credit, but not a grade, will be recorded on the 
student's permanent record. 

Graduate students who have been formally ad- 
mitted to the Graduate School and who have 
earned credits in the Boston College Summer 
Session will have their grades automatically trans- 
ferred to their permanent record unless the stu- 
dent requests otherwise. 

Housing 

The Boston College Off-Campus Housing Office 
offers assistance to graduate students in procur- 
ing living arrangements. 

Transportation 

Learning activities in a wide variety of hospitals, 
clinics, and health-related agencies are a vital part 
of the nursing program. The clinical facilities are 
located in the greater Metropolitan Boston area. 
Students are responsible for providing their own 
transportation to and from the clinical facilities. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Master's Program 

NU 301 Culture and Health Care (F: 3) 

This course brings the upper-division student into 
a direct care interface between the American 
health care delivery system and health care con- 
sumers of diverse socio-cultural backgrounds. 
Topics covered include lecture and discussions in 
the perception of health and illness among health 
care providers and consumers; the cultural and 
institutional factors that affect the consumers' 
access to and use of health care resources; heri- 
tage consistency and its relationship to health/ill- 
ness beliefs and practices; specific health and ill- 
ness beliefs and practices of selected populations; 
and issues related to the safe and effective deliv- 
ery of health care such as poverty and the right to 
health care. Rachel Spector 

NU 303 Adolescent Development and Health 
Care 

Prerequisite: Basic Psychology course 

This course is designed to provide a broad 
theoretical approach to the study of adolescent 
growth and development as a basis from which to 
examine major health concerns. Selected current 
health issues include the following: sexuality, 
teenage pregnancy and parenting, eating disor- 
ders, substance abuse, depression and suicide, and 
self-destructive behaviors. Various support/inter- 
vention services available for treatment are ex- 
plored. The use of music, poetry and literature for 
metaphoric meaning enhances an understanding 
of the adolescent experience. Not offered 94-95 

The Department 

NU 304 Death and Dying (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Core Psychology and Philosophy 
courses 

This course focuses on the concepts of death 
and dying from a philosophical, cultural and 
psychodynamic perspective. It includes discus- 
sions of the effect dealing with death has on the 
health giver and some intervention strategies. 

Miriam Gayle Wardle 



NU 307 Suicide Prevention, Intervention, 
Treatment Strategies (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Upper division undergraduate, R.N. 
and graduate students 

This course will examine some of the risk fac- 
tors leading to suicidal behavior and will address 
their implications. Content areas covered will in- 
clude dysfunctional families, suicidal adolescents, 
cults, multiple personality disorders and its con- 
nections to suicide, borderline patients, dissocia- 
tion, suicide survivors, patients who did not com- 
plete suicide, individual boundaries, and gender 
differences in suicide attempts. 

Miriam Gayle Wardle 

NU 308 Women and Health (S: 3) 

Using a feminist framework, this course will 
present an exploration of issues that affect the 
health and health care of women. Some of the 
areas to be included are the influences of environ- 
ment, culture, health practices, and decisions 
around research and resource allocation. 

Loretta Higgins 

NU 310 Modern Nutrition: Issues and 
Education (F, S: 3) 

This course provides an introduction to the prin- 
ciples of nutrition. Assignments help the student 
to choose the proper foods for health and relate 
them to the nutrient function. Environmental 
effects on nutrition and national and world nu- 
trition problems are considered. 

Patricia Harrington 

NU 312 Gerontological Nursing 

This course focuses on the health issues of aging 
persons and is designed for students providing 
health care to older clients in all clinical settings. 
Topics include the impact of changing demo- 
graphics, theories of aging, age-related changes 
and risk factors that interfere with physiological 
and psychosocial functioning, and the ethics and 
economics of health care for the elderly. Empha- 
sis is placed on research-based analysis of re- 
sponses of aging individuals to health problems, 
as well as interventions to prevent, maintain and 
restore health and quality of life. Not offered 
94-95 Ellen Mahoney 

NU 314 Wellness Lifestyle (F, S: 3) 

The major focus is on factors that contribute to 
increasing one's enjoyment and quality of life. 
Health promotion and disease prevention behav- 
iors that encourage self care and alternative treat- 
ment models are addressed. The emphases are on 
activities that students adopt to improve and 
maintain their own health status. Health care 
agencies and other resources in the community 
that contribute to the student's health status are 
identified and explored. Rosemary Krawczyk 

NU 420 Pharmacotherapeutic and Advanced 
Nursing Practice (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree in nursing 

This course is intended to provide the student 
with an understanding of pharmacology and drug 
therapy as it relates to advanced practice (general 
and/or in a clinical specialty). The inter-relation- 
ships of nursing and drug therapy will be explored 
through study of pharmacodynamics, dynamics of 
patient response to medical and nursing therapeu- 
tic regimens and patient teaching, as well as the 
psychosocial, economic, cultural, ethical and legal 



Graduate School of Nursing • Course Offerings • US 



factors affecting drug therapy, patient responses 
and nursing practice. The role of the nurse prac- 
ticing in an expanded role in decision making re- 
lated to drug therapy also is included. It is assumed 
that the student already has a basic knowledge of 
the major pharmacological classifications. This is 
a requirement for Adult Health. 

Laurel Eisenhauer 

NU 422 Advanced Concepts for Oncology 
Nursing (S: 3) 

This course is designed to expand students' un- 
derstanding of the concepts used in advanced 
oncology nursing practice. Current knowledge 
and research in cancer biophysiology, cancer 
therapeutics and human responses to the cancer 
experience will be included. Legal and ethical is- 
sues affecting the care of patients with cancer will 
be explored. Case studies and student projects will 
provide opportunities to apply course content to 
clinical decision making, staff education, quality 
assurance or research design. Phyllis Beveridge 

NU 426 Advanced Psychopharmacology (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

This course is designed for students who are 
specializing in psychiatric/mental health practice 
and students whose professional practice requires 
knowledge of psycho-tropic drugs. The course 
will review the role of the central nervous system 
in behavior and the drugs that focus on synaptic 
and cellular functions within the central nervous 
system. The use of psychopharmacological agents 
and differential diagnosis of major psychiatric 
disorders will be a focus of each class. Clinical 
examples and research criteria for drug studies will 
be included. Ethical, legal and professional issues 
will be covered with particular emphasis on pre- 
scription writing as it relates to the Clinical Spe- 
cialist in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing. 

Judith Shindid-Rothschild 
Carol Glod 

NU 441 Systems of Therapy in Psychiatric 
Mental Health Nursing Practice (F: 3) 

This course is required for graduate psychiatric 
mental health nursing students. This course pro- 
vides a foundation in the major systems of psy- 
chotherapy used in psychiatric mental health 
nursing and other disciplines engaged in mental 
health practice. The systems examined include the 
following: Psychodynamic, Humanistic, Existen- 
tial, Behavioral, Cognitive, and Systems Thera- 
pies. The following areas are addressed: defini- 
tions of personality, mental health and dysfunc- 
tion, principles of change, intervention strategies, 
and effectiveness of treatment of target popula- 
tions and problems. 

The usefulness of the various systems and 
theorists to psychiatric mental health nursing 
practice is evaluated. Psychotherapeutic interven- 
tions are examined in reference to inherent biases 
and limitations, demonstrated efficacy, and cul- 
tural social, and political considerations. 

June A. Horowitz 
Carol Hartman 

NU 443 Advanced Practice and Theory in 
Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing I (F: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 441, NU 515 and NU 516 or 
concurrently, and Physical Assessment 

This course is required for graduate psychi- 
atric mental health nursing students. This is the 



first of two major advanced theory and clinical 
specialty courses in psychiatric mental health 
nursing. Theories and practice are integrated to 
address the processes of assessment and diagno- 
sis of functional and dysfunctional patterns of 
behaviors, the formulation of initial intervention 
strategies, and the initiation of the Orientation 
Phase of psychiatric nursing intervention with se- 
lected clients. Clinical practice with adults and 
children take place in high-need, urban, commu- 
nity mental health delivery systems. Seminar and 
clinical practicum are both used as learning ex- 
periences. This course is complemented by the 
course NU 441 . Carol Hartman 

June Horowitz 

NU 452 Advanced Theory: Human Responses 
of Women, Children, Adolescents and Their 
Families (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 515 and NU 5 1 6 or concur- 
rently 

This course concentrates on the role of the 
nurse in advanced practice, in the development, 
utilization, analysis and synthesis of theoretical 
knowledge for the health management, including 
nursing diagnosis and clinical judgment of 
women, infants, children, adolescents and their 
families to promote an optimal level of function- 
ing. The psychodynamics of childbearing and 
childrearing are explored. Theories and research 
from nursing and other disciplines are applied and 
integrated through classes and course assign- 
ments. Joellen Hawkins 

NU 453 Advanced Practice in Women's Health 
Nursing I (F: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 452, NU 515 and NU 516 or 
concurrently, and Physical Assessment 

This course concentrates on the role of the 
nurse in advanced practice with women across the 
life span, focusing on alterations in women's 
health patterns. The psychosocial dynamics of 
womanhood and of the sexuality-reproductive 
pattern area are explored with special concern for 
diversity. Theories and research from nursing and 
other disciplines are applied and integrated 
through seminars, clinical conferences, clinical 
experiences and course assignments. 

Joellen Hawkins 
Margaret Kearney 

NU 457 Advanced Practice in Pediatric 
Ambulatory Care Nursing I (F: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 452, NU 515 and NU 516 or 
concurrently, and Physical Assessment 

This course concentrates on the role of the 
nurse in advanced practice, with infants, children, 
adolescents and their families. The psychosocial 
dynamics of parenting and childhood are ex- 
plored. Theories and research from nursing and 
other disciplines are applied and integrated 
through seminars, clinical conferences, clinical ex- 
periences and course assignments. Susan Kelley 

Doris Hanna 

NU 459 Advanced Practice in Acute and 
Chronic Care of Children I (F: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 452, NU 515 and NU 516 or 
concurrently, and Physical Assessment 

This course concentrates on the role of the 
nurse in advanced practice with infants, children 
and adolescents in acute/chronic care pediatric 
settings. The psychosocial dynamics of parenting, 



childhood and illness are explored. Theories and 
research from nursing and other disciplines are 
applied and integrated through seminars, clinical 
conferences, clinical experiences and course as- 
signments. The Depart?nent 

NU 462 Advanced Theory in Adult Health 
Nursing I (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 515 and NU 516 or concur- 
rently 

This is the first in a series of four courses in 
the theory and practice in adult nursing. The 
course uses The Integrated Metaparadigm incor- 
porating human life processes, functional health 
patterns and human responses within the broader 
life process of becoming, with emphasis on health 
and optimal functional ability. The course will 
include exploration of theories and models under- 
lying specific life processes and interaction with 
their environment in adults with varied health 
state, age, developmental and gender character- 
istics. Diagnostic, therapeutic and ethical reason- 
ing concepts are incorporated in the. analysis and 
assessment (measurement) of dimensions and 
parameters of resulting functional health patterns 
and human responses. Carol Mandle 

Rita Olivieri 
Susan Chase 

NU 463 Advanced Practice in Adult Health 
Nursing I (F: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 462, NU 515 and NU 516 or 
concurrently, and Physical Assessment 

This course concentrates on assessment and 
diagnosis within the development of advanced 
adult nursing practice based on theoretical knowl- 
edge and research. Clinical learning experiences 
focus on the increased integration of ethical and 
diagnostic judgments within the health care of 
adults to promote their optimal level of being and 
functioning. Analysis of selected health care de- 
livery systems will emphasize the identification of 
variables to be changed to enhance optimal lev- 
els of health care. Theories and research from 
nursing and other disciplines are applied and in- 
tegrated through seminars, clinical conferences, 
clinical practice and course assignments. 

Margaret Murphy 
Carol Mandle 
Dorothy Jones 

NU 472 Advanced Theory in Community Health 
Nursing I (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 515 and NU 516 or concur- 
rently 

This course is the first of a series in the theory 
and advanced practice of community health nurs- 
ing. This course focuses on theories, concepts and 
research findings in the development and evalu- 
ation of nursing interventions and strategies that 
promote health in aggregates and communities. 
Health legislation and multiple socioeconomic 
factors are analyzed to determine their influence 
on planning for family health and community well 
being. Rachel Spector 

NU 473 Advanced Practice in Community 
Health Nursing I (F: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 472, NU 515 and NU 516 or 
concurrently,and Physical Assessment 

This course focuses on the study, analysis and 
application of nursing theories and frameworks as 
they relate to the nursing care of families and 



116 • Graduate School of Nursing • Course Offerings 



communities. Emphasis is placed on the roles of 
the family nurse practitioner and the clinical nurse 
specialist in the development of skills for the as- 
sessment phase, including nursing and primary 
care diagnoses. Theory and research are inte- 
grated through seminars, as well as clinical con- 
ferences and experiences. Clinical settings include 
health departments, health centers, visiting nurse 
associations, home care agencies, health mainte- 
nance organizations and occupational health pro- 
grams. Sally Rankin 

Nancy Gaspard 

NU 500 Assessment of Parent-Infant 
Interaction 

This course is based upon current theory and re- 
search related to the Barnard Model of parent- 
infant-environment interaction. Students will 
learn how to reliably administer four assessment 
scales: (1) the Nursing Child Assessment Sleep 
Activity Record (NCASA) infants and toddlers; 
(2) the Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale 
(NCAF) birth to one year; (3) the Nursing Child 
Assessment Teaching Scale (NCAF) birth to 
three years, and (4) the Home Observation Mea- 
surement of the Environment (HOME) birth to 
three years. Case study presentations will be used 
to demonstrate how these assessments can be used 
to identify and intervene with families at risk. Not 
offered 94-95 The Department 

NU 515 Nursing Knowledge Development 
(F: 2-S: 2) 

Prerequisites: Open to upper-division R.N. and 
B.S. nursing students, and non-matriculated nurs- 
ing students with permission of instructor 

The course focuses on the analysis of theory 
and conceptual frameworks as the basis for ad- 
vanced nursing practice and development of nurs- 
ing knowledge. Opportunity is provided for con- 
cept analysis and development within each 
student's specialty area. Theoretical models are 
compared and contrasted in relation to nursing's 
metaparadigm. Emphasis is placed on the rela- 
tionships among practice, theory and research. 

Sr. Callista Roy 

June Horowitz 

Mary Ellen Doona 

NU 516 Clinical Judgment: Ethical, Diagnostic 
and Therapeutic (F: 2-S: 2) 

Prerequisites: Open to upper-division R.N. and 
B.S. nursing students, and non-matriculated nurs- 
ing students with permission of instructor 

The course focuses on the three domains of 
clinical judgment. In the ethical reasoning mod- 
ule, emphasis is on the philosophical basis of nurs- 
ing practice, ethical principles and reasoning, and 
the application of theories and frameworks in 
clinical reasoning. The diagnostic-therapeutic 
module focuses on nursing diagnosis and diagnos- 
tic-therapeutic reasoning. Information processing 
and decision-making theories are examined for 
clinical usefulness. Marjory Gordon 

Catherine Murphy 

NU 517 Advanced Nursing Practice-Role 
Implementation and Integration (F, S: 2) 

Prerequisites: NU 515, NU 516 or concurrently 

The focus of this course is on the mastery of 
nursing concepts used in the development of 
nursing's advanced practice role within social in- 
stitutions that impact on health care delivery. 



Dimensions of the role will be explored with par- 
ticular emphasis on leadership, accountability, au- 
tonomy, professionalism, collaboration, consul- 
tation and research. Emphasis will also be placed 
on implementing innovative practice models in 
multiple settings focusing on case management 
within the framework of health care reform The 
course builds on the cognates, nursing knowledge 
development, advanced nursing practice-role 
implementation, and integration and health care 
economics. In addition, strategies will be explored 
around the utilization of nursing knowledge in 
practice. Role activities are explored at all levels 
of intervention: primary, secondary and tertiary. 

Dorothy Jones 

Judy Shindul-Rothschild 

Joellen Hawkins 

NU 520 Nursing Research Theory (F, S : 3) 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate statistics course 

Open to upper-division R.N. and B.S. nurs- 
ing students, non-nursing graduate students and 
non-matriculated nursing students with permis- 
sion of instructor 

Research methods such as experimental/ 
quasi-experimental, exploratory-descriptive and 
naturalistic inquiry are presented. Research de- 
sign considerations include types of control, 
threats to validity, and sampling plan in the con- 
text of issues of language, gender, ethnicity, and 
culture. Clinical problems for research are iden- 
tified focusing on health, nursing, environment 
and the person. 

Note: Those students who have completed 
NU 520 for 2 credits will register in one of the 
following: NU 523, NU 524, NU 525 in a spe- 
cial section for 4 credits. In these special 4 credit 
sections, students will be given extra work to ac- 
cumulate the 3 7 credits needed for graduation. 

Anne Norris 

NU 523 Computer Analysis of Health Care 
Data (F: 3-5: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 520 or concurrently or permis- 
sion of instructor 

This course focuses on the choice of appro- 
priate statistics for analyzing nursing and health 
care data for various populations and settings. 
Students will analyze health care data using the 
VAX system and SPSS software packages. An 
existing data set will provide practical experiences. 

Bernadette Hungler 

NU 524 Masters Research Practicum (F: 3-S: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 520 or concurrently 

This course applies knowledge of the research 
process through the development and implemen- 
tation of a clinical research proposal, a quality 
assurance proposal or a research utilization pro- 
posal. Miriam Gayle Wardle 

The Departments 

NU 525 Integrative Review of Nursing 
Research (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 520 or concurrently 

The focus of the course is on the use of a sys- 
tematic and analytic process in the critical analy- 
sis and synthesis of empirical nursing research. 
This is to develop and to test hypotheses derived 
from a theoretical model. The research area is to 
be related to the student's specialty area. 
Note: Those students who have completed 
NU 520 for 2 credits will register in one of the 



following: NU 523, NU 524, NU 525 in a spe- 
cial section for 4 credits. In these special 4 credit 
sections, students will be given extra work to ac- 
cumulate the 37 credits needed for graduation. 

Laurel Eisenhauer 
The Department 

NU 541 Stress and Trauma: Individual/Family 
Responses (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Required for graduate psychiatric 
mental health nursing students. Open to a limited 
number of graduate students in other nursing spe- 
cialties as well as non-nursing graduate students 
involved in counseling/therapy. 

This course examines the existing and evolv- 
ing theories of stress responses and responses to 
trauma, particularly Post-Traumatic Stress Dis- 
order. Preventive and therapeutic interventions 
will be examined in relation to scope and limita- 
tions. The nursing, social work, psychiatry, psy- 
chology, sociology and the biological sciences lit- 
erature are used. Relevant theory, current re- 
search, and intervention models are examined in 
relation to clinical problems. Carol Hartman 

June Horowitz 

NU 543 Advanced Practice and Theory in 
Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing II (S: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 443 , NU 5 1 7 or concurrently 
Required for graduate psychiatric mental 
health nursing students. 

This is the second major advanced theory and 
clinical specialty course. Differential diagnostic 
processes are examined in reference to DSM III- 
R and Nursing Diagnosis systems. Theories and 
interventions concerning major mental health 
disorders are evaluated to judge their relevance 
and efficacy for work with high-need urban popu- 
lations. Treatment needs of both adults and chil- 
dren are also addressed. Clinical learning experi- 
ences focus on the implementation of the Work- 
ing and Termination Phases of psychiatric nurs- 
ing intervention. Students will have experience 
with a variety of intervention modalities. Semi- 
nar and a clinical practicum are both used as learn- 
ing experiences. This course is complemented by 
NU 441 and NU 541 . Carol Hartman 

June Horowitz 

NU 552 Advanced Theory II: Diagnosis and 
Treatment of Human Response Patterns of 
Women, Infants, Children, Adolescents and 
Their Families (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 5 1 7 or concurrently 

This course concentrates on the role of the 
nurse in advanced practice in the development, 
utilization, analysis and synthesis of theoretical 
knowledge and research for the health manage- 
ment and evaluation of the management of 
women, infants, children, adolescents and their 
families. These theories guide direct role compo- 
nents that are aimed at promoting an optimal level 
of family functioning, as well as the indirect role 
components that constitute advanced practice in 
maternal child health nursing. Theories and re- 
search from nursing and other disciplines are ap- 
plied and integrated through classes and course 
assignments. Susan Kelley 

Doris Hanna 



Graduate School of Nursing • Coursf. Offerings • 1 17 



NU 553 Advanced Practice in Women's Health 
Nursing II (S: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 453, NU 517 or concurrently 
This course builds on Maternal Child Health 
Nursing Theory and Advanced Practice I; it con- 
centrates on the role of the nurse in advanced 
practice with women across the life span, focus- 
ing on development and evaluation of manage- 
ment strategies for optimal level of functioning 
in women seeking well woman obstetrical and gy- 
necological care, as well as the indirect role func- 
tions in advanced practice as clinical nurse spe- 
cialist/nurse practitioner with these women. 
Theories and research from nursing and other 
disciplines are applied and integrated through 
seminars, clinical conferences, clinical experiences 
and course assignments. Joellen Hawkins 

Margaret Kearney 

NU 557 Advanced Practice in Pediatric 
Ambulatory Care II (S: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 457, NU 517 or concurrently 
This course builds on the content of Mater- 
nal Child Health Process I and concentrates on 
the role of the nurse in advanced practice in the 
development and evaluation of primary care nurs- 
ing management strategies for the optimal level 
of functioning with infants, children, adolescents 
and their families, as well as the indirect role func- 
tions of the advanced nurse practitioner with these 
clients. Theories and research from nursing and 
other disciplines are applied and integrated 
through seminars, clinical conferences, clinical ex- 
periences and course assignments. Susan Kelley 

Doris Hanna 

NU 559 Advanced Practice in Acute and 
Chronic Care of Children II (S: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 459, NU 5 1 7 or concurrently 
This course builds on the content of NU 459 
and concentrates on the role of the nurse in ad- 
vanced practice in the development and evalua- 
tion of acute and chronic care nursing manage- 
ment strategies for the optimal level of function- 
ing with infants, children, adolescents and their 
families, as well as the indirect role functions of 
the advanced practice nurse with these clients. 
Theories and research from nursing and other 
disciplines are applied and integrated through 
seminars, clinical conferences, clinical experiences 
and course assignments. The Department 

NU 562 Advanced Theory in Adult Health 
Nursing II (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 5 1 7 or concurrently 

This course concentrates on the development, 
use, analysis and synthesis of theoretical knowl- 
edge and research for intervention with advanced 
adult health nursing practice. The role compo- 
nents that constitute advanced practice in adult 
health nursing are developed and evaluated for 
their potential contributions in improving the 
quality of adult health care. Professional, socio- 
economic, political, legal and ethical forces influ- 
encing practice are analyzed and corresponding 
change strategies proposed. Theories and re- 
search from nursing and other disciplines are ap- 
plied and evaluated through classes and assign- 
ments. Laurel Eisenhauer 

Carol Mandle 



NU 563 Advanced Practice in Adult Health 
Nursing II (S: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 462, NU 463, NU 517 or con- 
currently 

This course concentrates on the implementa- 
tion, evaluation and development of advanced 
nursing practice based on theoretical knowledge 
and research. Clinical learning experiences focus 
on the increased integration of ethical, diagnos- 
tic and therapeutic judgments within the health 
care of adults to promote their optimal level of 
being and functioning. Margaret Murphy 

Carol Mandle 

Susan Chase 

Dorothy Jones 

NU 572 Advanced Theory in Community Health 
Nursing II (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 472, NU 517 or concurrently 
This course is the second of a series in the 
theory and advanced practice of community 
health nursing. The course focuses on concepts, 
theories and research in the development of 
knowledge and skills for the health assessment 
phase of the nursing process, including nursing 
diagnosis and clinical judgment. Emphasis is on 
health promotion and the attainment of an opti- 
mum level of wellness in families and communi- 
ties. Theories and research from nursing and 
other disciplines are integrated. The processes of 
outcomes of intervention are systematically evalu- 
ated. Rachel Spector 

NU 573 Advanced Practice in Community 
Health Nursing II (S: 5) 

Prerequisites: NU 473, NU 517 or concurrently 
This course focuses on the roles of the family 
nurse practitioner (FNP)/Clinical Nurse Special- 
ist (CNS) in the development, implementation 
and evaluation of nursing interventions with fami- 
lies, aggregates and the community client. Selec- 
tion of either the family or the community focus 
facilitates development of the FNP/CNS. Semi- 
nars, clinical conferences, lectures and clinical 
experiences provide opportunities to integrate 
theory, concepts and research as well as to further 
synthesize role components. Sally Rankin 

Nancy Gaspard 

NU 670 Ethical Issues in Nursing Practice (F: 3) 

Open to non-matriculated students and non-ma- 
jors. 

This course focuses on the ethical dimensions 
of the nurse-patient relationship and current 
moral issues in nursing practice. Beginning with 
a reflection on the students' own values, the 
course examines the philosophical basis of nurs- 
ing ethics and its implications for the interpreta- 
tion and application of ethical principles. The 
moral responsibility of nurses as patient advocates 
is considered in such areas as the patient's right 
to know, behavior control, and problems concern- 
ing life and death. In addition, the ethical deci- 
sion-making process and the moral obligations of 
nurses are examined in relationship to the ethical 
barriers that exist in health care institutions, and 
strategies for dealing with the social context of 
decision making will be developed. 

Catherine Murphy 



NU 672 Physiological Life Processes (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisite: Baccalaureate degree in nursing or 
permission of instructor 

A study of physiologic theories applicable to 
nursing. Focus is on normal and abnormal life 
processes with application to exemplar cases. The 
unit on normal cell physiology is followed with 
specific reference to cellular and/or systemic dys- 
function. Topics begin with cellular physiology 
and move to the nervous system form and func- 
tion, then to muscle and blood processes, then 
through processes of cardiovascular, respiratory, 
gastrointestinal, renal and endocrine regulation. 
This course is a requirement for Adult Health. 

Susan Chase 

NU 699 Independent Study in Nursing 
(F, S: Credits by arrangement) 

Prerequisite: Permission of an instructor and the 
Chairperson. Recommendation of a second fac- 
ulty member is advised. 

Students with a special interest in nursing may 
pursue that interest under the direction of the 
faculty. A written proposal for an independent 
study in nursing must be submitted to the Edu- 
cational Policy Committee together with support- 
ing statements from the faculty member direct- 
ing the study and a faculty member whose area of 
concentration qualifies him or her to judge the 
fitness of the proposed undertaking to graduate 
study. The student is required to submit written 
reports to the faculty member directing the study 
and the Educational Policy Committee at the end 
of the semester. The Department 

NU 801 Master's Thesis (F, S: 3) 

Prerequisites: Six credits of research including NU 
520 and one of the following: NU 523, NU 524 
or NU 525. Specialty Theory and Practice I and 
II as well as NU 5 1 7 or concurrently 

The nursing thesis follows the research theory 
and research option. Students elaborate on learn- 
ing experiences gained in the research courses by 
completing an individual clinical research project 
under the guidance of a faculty member and a 
reader. The Department 

NU 802 Thesis Direction (F: 0-S: 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received 
six credits for Thesis Seminar but who have not 
finished their thesis. This course must be regis- 
tered for and the continuation fee paid each se- 
mester until the thesis is completed. 

The Depart?nent 

NU 888 Master's Interim Study (F: 0-S: 0) 

For Master's candidates who have completed all 
course requirements but wish to remain enrolled 
while preparing for comprehensive examinations. 

The Department 

Doctoral Program 

NU 701 Epistemology of Nursing (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Doctoral standing; PL 593, or con- 
currently 

This is an examination of the nature of epis- 
temology, of philosophy of science movements 
affecting nursing as a scholarly discipline, and of 
the developing epistemology of nursing. This 
course includes perspectives on the nature of 
truth, understanding, causality, continuity, and 
change in science, as well as on positivism, 



118 • Graduate School of Nursing • Course Offerings 



empiricism, reductionism, holism, phenomenol- 
ogy and existentialism as they relate to nursing 
knowledge development. The identification of the 
phenomena of study and scientific progress in 
nursing are critiqued. Sr. Callista Roy 

Sally Rankin 

NU 702 Strategies of Knowledge Development 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: NU 701 

This is an in-depth study of the processes of 
theory construction and knowledge development. 
This course includes concept and statement 
analysis, synthesis and derivation from both in- 
ductive and deductive perspectives. Prepositional 
statements are defined by order of probability and 
the processes for deriving and ordering such state- 
ments are analyzed. Issues and examples of em- 
pirical, deductive, interpretive and statistical strat- 
egies for developing knowledge are examined. 
Experience is provided in concept analysis and 
knowledge synthesis of selected topics within one 
of the research foci: clinical and ethical judgments 
and human life processes and patterns. 

Sr. Callista Roy 
Sally Rankin 

NU 710 Themes of Inquiry I: Clinical Topics 

(F:3) 

Prerequisite: NU 702 

This course analyzes selected middle-range 
theories related to life processes. Emphasis is 
placed on the structure of knowledge, research 
design, and selected current research programs in 
nursing. Emerging themes of life processes at the 
individual, family and group levels are considered. 

Marjory Gordon 

NU 711 Themes of Inquiry II: Clinical Judgment 

(S:3) 

Prerequisite: NU 710 

In this course, students examine several pro- 
grams of nursing research as themes of inquiry. 
There is an in-depth examination of the work of 
selected nurse researchers who have established 
a record of research productivity in the literature. 
Emphasis is placed on the problems investigated, 
populations studied, research design, usefulness 
of results for practice, and development of middle 
range theory related to life processes. Students 
present one program of research to illustrate how 
a sustained research effort can contribute to 
knowledge development. The outcomes of re- 
search are evaluated and future directions identi- 
fied. Through a "State of the Science" paper, stu- 
dents demonstrate their ability to synthesize the 
literature concerning a theoretical or clinical area 
of interest. The seminars provide opportunity for 
students and faculty to engage in discussion about 
how one may develop a program of research, the 
importance of particular work to nursing science, 
and the application of research result to clinical 
practice. Laurel Eisenhauer 

Carol Hartman 

Susan Kelley 

Marjory Gordon 

NU 742 Nursing Research Methods: 
Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Doctoral Program or 
permission of Faculty Teacher of Record 

This introductory course fulfills a research 
methods requirement for doctoral students in 



nursing. The course focuses upon research meth- 
ods relevant to doctoral students in nursing. Ap- 
plication of quantitative and qualitative method- 
ologies to a variety of research questions is ex- 
plored. Mary E. Duffy 

Evelyn Barbee 

NU 744 Statistics: Computer Application and 
Analysis of Data (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 742 

Study of the interrelations between research 
design and quantitative analysis of data. The fo- 
cus will be on the use of analytic software on the 
personal computer to create, manage and analyze 
data. The specific statistical techniques will in- 
clude those most frequently reported in the re- 
search literature of the health sciences. 

Barbara Hazard Munro 

NU 746 Measurement: Norm- and Criterion- 
Referenced Approaches (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 742 or permission of Faculty 
Teacher of Record 

This course focuses upon measurement 
theory and practice as it is used in nursing and 
health-related research. Measurement theory and 
major concepts of norm-referenced and criterion- 
referenced approaches are explored. Emphasis is 
placed on the critical appraisal of the psychomet- 
rics of various types of instruments within the two 
measurement approaches, including physiologi- 
cal and observational measurement, biobehavioral 
markers, interviews, questionnaires and scales. 

Sally Rankin 

NU 751 Advanced Qualitative Methods (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 742 or an equivalent introduc- 
tory course or portion of a course on Qualitative 
Research Methods. Permission of instructor re- 
quired 

This serr nar is designed for students in nurs- 
ing and the so.ial sciences who are taking a quali- 
tative approach to research. The course will pro- 
vide experience in qualitative data collection and 
analysis, as well as writing up findings for publi- 
cation. Cathy Malek 

NU 753 Advanced Quantitative Nursing 
Research Methods (S: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 742 or permission of Faculty 
Teacher of Record 

This seminar is designed to guide doctoral 
students in the design and conduct of quantita- 
tive research studies in their chosen areas of fo- 
cus. The seminar builds on the knowledge at- 
tained in previous research design and statistics 
courses. The doctoral student is expected to ap- 
ply this knowledge in the development of a re- 
search proposal that will serve as the basis for the 
doctoral dissertation. The seminar is not a re- 
placement for the work of the Dissertation Com- 
mittee; rather it serves to provide a structure 
within which the student can apply the elements 
of the research process in a written, systematic and 
pragmatic way. Mary E. Duffy 

NU 810 Research Practicum I (F: 1) 

Prerequisite: NU 701 or concurrently 

This is the first in the series of four research 
practica that offers the student the opportunity to 
further develop and focus their research concen- 
tration, to analyze and synthesize the state of 
knowledge development in the area of concentra- 
tion and to collaborate with faculty on existing 
projects and publications. The Department 



NU 81 1 Research Practicum II (S: 1) 

Prerequisites: NU 810, NU 702 or concurrently 
This is the second in the series of four research 
practica that offers the student the continuation 
of practicum with emphasis on individually devel- 
oped research experiences that contribute to the 
design of a preliminary study. The Department 

NU 812 Research Practicum III (F: 1) 

Prerequisites: NU 810, NU 81 1 

This is the fourth in the series of four research 
practica that offers the student individualized re- 
search experience in a concentration area. The 
student begins to implement a small research 
study (qualitative or quantitative methodology). 

The Department 

NU 813 Research Practicum IV (S: 1) 

Prerequisite: NU810,NU811,NU812 

Fourth in the series of four research practica 
that offers the student individualized research ex- 
perience in a concentration area. Continuation of 
preliminary research study begun in NU 811 and 
NU 812 with emphasis on data analysis, drawing 
conclusions and communication of findings/im- 
plications. The Department 

NU 820 Expanding Paradigms for Nursing 
Research (F: 3) 

Prerequisites: NU 702, NU 812, NU 710 or con- 
currently 

Review and synthesis of research related to se- 
lected clinical research topic within the substan- 
tive knowledge area that is the focus of study, that 
is, a given human life process, pattern and re- 
sponse, or diagnostic or ethical judgment. 

Dorothy Jones 

NU 821 Nursing Research and Health Policy 
Formulation (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 820 

Research utilization in health policy formu- 
lation is explored as well as the ethical obligations 
of nurse scientists in the conduct of research. 
Personal programs of research are projected in 
keeping with present and future priorities in nurs- 
ing science. Margaret A. Murphy 

NU 901 Dissertation Advisement (F: 3) 

Prerequisite: Doctoral Comprehensives 

This course develops and carries out disser- 
tation research, together with a plan for a specific 
contribution to clinical nursing knowledge devel- 
opment. The Department 

NU 902 Dissertation Advisement (S: 3) 

Prerequisite: NU 901 or consent of instructor 

This course develops and carries out disser- 
tation research, together with a plan for a specific 
contribution to clinical nursing knowledge devel- 
opment. The Department 

NU 998 Doctoral Comprehensives (F, S: 0) 

All doctoral students who have completed their 
coursework and are preparing for comprehensive 
exams must register for this course. 

The Department 

NU 999 Doctoral Continuation (F, S: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy 
for the Ph.D. degree and have not completed their 
dissertation after taking six credits of Dissertation 
Advisement are required to register for Doctoral 
Continuation. The Department 



Graduate School of Nursing • Preceptors • 119 



PRECEPTOR AND RESOURCE 
PERSONNEL APPOINTMENTS FOR 
GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Anne Alberti, B.S., Boston College; M.S., Boston 
University 

Joanne Aldrich, B.S.N., University of Texas at 
Galveston; M.S.N., University of Lowell; Ed.D., 
Boston University 

Joyce Ames, B.S., Salve Regina College; M.S., 
Simmons College 

Katharine Bailey, B.S., Boston University; M.S., 
Boston College 

Nancy Coyne Baker, B.S., Boston College; 

M.S.N., Simmons College 

Elizabeth Borghesani, B.S., Jackson College; 
B.S.N., Boston State College; M.S., Boston 
College 

Robin Brooke-Meldon, B.S. University of 
Virginia; M.S. Catholic University of America 

Judy B rucks, B.S.N., University of Rhode Island; 
M.S., Boston College 

Anne Wirick Brown, B.S., Worcester State 
College; M.S., Simmons College 

Gale A. Cahoon, B.S., Salem State College; 
M.S., University of Lowell 

Patricia Canavan, B.S.N., University of 
Massachusetts; M.S., Boston College 

Virginia Curtin Capasso, B.S.N., Northeastern 
University; M.S., Yale University 

Dorothy Carver-Chase, B.S., University ofNew 
Hampshire; M.S., Boston College 

Mary Scahill Challela, B.S., Boston University; 
M.S., D.N.Sc, Boston University 

Jennifer Clair, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; 
M.S., Boston College 

Constance Clarke, B. A., B.S., Boston University; 
M.S., Boston Family Institute 

Constance Crowley-Ganser, B.S., University 
of Massachusetts; M.S., University of California, 
San Francisco 

Martha Curley, B.S., University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst; M.S.N., Yale University 

Carole P. Davis, B.S., Boston College; M.S., 
Boston University 

Donna M. Donilon, B.S., M.S. Boston College 

Theresa Dowling-Williams, B.S., M.S., Bos- 
ton College 

Paula Griffin Dwan, B.S., M.S., Boston College 

Rosamunde Ebacher, B.S., University of New 
Hampshire; M.S., Boston College 

Kathy J. Fabiszewski, B.S.N., Salem State 
College; M.S., University of Lowell 

Judith A. Farley, A.D., Curry College; B.S.N., 
Curry College; M.S.N., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Luisa Fertitta, B.S., College of Saint Teresa; 
M.S., Boston College 



Dorothy Goulart Fisher, B.S.N., University of 
Rhode Island; M.S., Boston College 

Karen Flaherty, B.S., Boston State College; M.S., 
Boston College 

Georgina Flannery, B.A., Emmanuel College; 
M.S., Simmons College 

Raymond Flannery, Jr., B.A., College of Holy 
Cross; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., University 
of Windsor 

Nancy Fox-Webber, B.S., University of 

Wisconsin; M.S.N., Simmons College 

Helen Gilbert, B.S., Worcester State College; 
M.S., Massachusetts General Hospital Institute 
of Health Professions 

Constance Gillett, B.S., Southeastern 
Massachusetts University; M.S., Boston College 

Carol Glod, B.S., University of Rochester; M.S., 
Boston College 

Nancy Goldberg, B.A., Johns Hopkins 

University; B.S.N., Columbia University; M.S.N., 
University of Pennsylvania 

Victoria Griffin, B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson 
University; M.S. Simmons College 

Ann Gurka, B.S., M.S., Boston College 

Patricia Mahon Halkola, A.S.N. , Chabot 
College; B.S., California State University; M.S., 
Boston College 

Jill Hallisey, B.S. , Northeastern University; M.S., 
Boston College 

Cynthia Hodson, B.S.N., Northeastern 
University; M.S., Boston College 

Ann Hurley, B.S., Boston College; M.S., D.N.Sc, 
Boston University 

Carol Kelly, B.S., University of Vermont; M.S., 
Boston College 

Patricia Kraepelien- Bartels, B.S. University of 
California, Los Angeles; M.S., University of 
California, Davis 

Janet Kunsman, B.S., Salem State College;M.S., 
Boston College 

Cheryl Lacasse, B.S., University of Rochester; 
M.S., Boston College 

Maryanne Ladd, B.S., Northeastern University; 
M.S., Boston College 

Ellen Leary, B.S., Boston College; M.S.N., 
Catholic University of America 

Joan Lederman, A.S.N., Lasell Junior College; 
B.S.N., California State University; M.S.N., 
University of Pennsylvania 

Kathleen Leonard, B.S., University of 
Massachusetts; M.S., Boston College 

Anatoly Levin, M.A., Ph.D., Moscow School of 
Education 

Martha Marean, B.S., Boston University; M.S., 
Boston College 

Jennie Mastroianni, B.S., University of 
Connecticut; M.S., Boston College 

Susan McKenney, B.S., University of Lowell; 
M.S., University of Lowell 



Elizabeth Mullen, B.S., Boston College; M.S., 
Boston College 

Barbara Neizo, B.A., University of Hartford; 
M.S., Boston University 

Angela Maida Nicoletti, B.S., Boston College 
M.S., Boston College 

Angela Patterson, B.S., Simmons College; M.S., 
Simmons College 

Sheila Orlinoff Poswolsky, B.A., Case Western 
Reserve University; B.S.N., Cornell University; 
M.S.N., Simmons College 

Cheryl Panzarella, B.S., M.S., Boston College 

Anna Melone Pollock, B.S., M.S., Boston 

College 

Donna Principato, B.S., M.S., Boston College 

Veronica Frances Rempusheski, B.S., Seton 
Hall University; M.S., University of Colorado; 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Patricia Rissmiller, B.S.N., Catholic University; 
M.S. University of Colorado; D.N.Sc, Boston 
University 

Nancy Schappler, B.S., Salve Regina College; 
M.S., Boston College 

Eunice Shishmanian, B.S., Simmons College; 
M.S., Boston College 

Toni St. Germain, B.S., Boston College; M.S., 
Framingham State College; M.S., Boston College 

Eileen Stuart, B.S.N., St. Anselm's College; 
M.S., Boston College 

Nancy Swanson, B.S., St. Joseph College; M.S., 
Boston University 

Eleanor Tabeek, B.S., Boston College; M.S., 
Catholic University of America; Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Rosemary Theroux, B.S., Worcester State 
College; M.S., Boston College 

Margaret Williams, B.S., University of Southern 
Maine; M.S., Boston College 



120 • Graduate School of Social Work • Professional Programs: Master's Level 



Graduate School of Social Work 

In keeping with the four-century Jesuit tradition of educating stu- 
dents in the service of humanity, Boston College established a Gradu- 
ate School of Social Work in March 1936. In addition to providing 
foundation courses for all students, its professional programs afford 
each the opportunity to concentrate in a social work method: clini- 
cal social work or social planning and administration on the Master's 
level; clinical social work or social planning on the Doctoral level. 
Practice area subconcentrations, including Child Welfare, Occupa- 
tional Social Work, Health and Medical Care, Forensic Social Work 
and Gerontology, are also available within the Master's level concen- 
trations. 



PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM: MASTER'S 
LEVEL 

The Master's Program is accredited by the Coun- 
cil on Social Work Education and is designed for 
completion in two full-time academic years of 
concurrent class and field work. Students may also 
take the First Year segment on a part-time basis 
over four semesters and a summer. All degree re- 
quirements are to be fulfilled within a period of 
six years, at least one of which must be a year of 
residence. 

Off-campus Opportunities: A major portion of the 
part-time component is available at sites in the 
Worcester, Plymouth, and Springfield areas, and 
in Portland, Maine, in addition to Chestnut Hill. 
While classes for all students in the final full-time 
year are conducted on the main campus, field 
placements can be arranged in the respective geo- 
graphic areas. 

Social Work Practice 

The foundation courses in social work practice are 
designed to acquaint students with the generic as- 
pects of theory and practice skills common to all 
modes of intervention with individuals, families, 
small groups and communities. It also incorpo- 
rates a bridging component relating the content 
to the specific modes in which the students plan 
to concentrate and is a prerequisite for them. 
SW 700 Social Work Practice 
SW 825 Social Work with Groups 
SW 879 Social Work Practice with Women 
SW 880 Social Work Practice in Child Welfare 

Social Welfare Policy and Services 

Foundation courses in the Social Welfare Policy 
and Services area are designed to give the student 
a knowledge of the various social welfare prob- 
lems and issues that affect individuals in today's 
world. Offerings include foundation courses and 
electives with advanced content. 
SW 701 The Social Welfare System 
SW 702 Social Policy Analysis 
SW801 Racism: Dynamics of Social Process 



SW 802 The Challenge of the Aging Society: 
Issues and Options 

SW 805 Issues in Family and Children's 

Services 

S W 808 Legal Aspects of Social Work 

SW 8 1 3 Comparative Policy Analysis and Field 

Experience 

SW 814 Ethical and Policy Issues in 
Contemporary Health Care 

SW 818 Forensic Issues for Clinical Social 
Workers-Focus: Prisoners 

SW 819 SWPS Independent Study 

Human Behavior and the Social 
Environment 

Courses in the Human Behavior and Social En- 
vironment area are designed to give the student a 
knowledge of the physical, psychological, and 
social/environmental forces that affect human de- 
velopment. Course offerings are the following: 
S W 72 1 Human Behavior and the Social 
Environment 

SW 722 Psychosocial Pathology 
SW 724 Social Work Perspectives on 
Organizations and Communities 
SW 727 Substance Abuse: Alcohol and Other 
Drugs 

SW 820 Advanced Social Work Practice in 
Response to the AIDS Epidemic 

SW 82 1 Small Group Theory 

SW 822 The Traumatic Impact of 

Victimization on Child and Adolescent 

Development 

SW 827 Ego Psychology 

SW 833 Social Gerontology 

SW 836 Self Psychology 

SW 839 HBSE Independent Study 

Social Work Research 

Research is viewed as an action-oriented method 
of social work intervention building knowledge to 
improve social work and social welfare services. 
The curriculum focus is to produce social work 



practitioners who (1) are concerned and knowl- 
edgeable about issues, needs, and service delivery 
problems of at-risk groups, and (2) are able to 
design and implement research efforts relevant to 
social work practice with such groups. 

Foundation and elective courses include the 
following: 

SW 740 Introduction to the Computer 

SW 747 Research Methods in Social Work 
Practice 

SW 751 Quantitative Methods in Social Work 
Practice 

SW 840 Advanced Quantitative Analysis 

SW 841 Evaluative Research for Micro- Practice 

SW 844 Evaluative Research for Macro- 
Practice 

SW 845-846 Research Design Seminar I-II 

SW 848 Research Readings in Women's Issues 

SW 849 Research Independent Study 

SW 850 Research Group/Independent Study: 

Advanced Couples and Family Therapy; 

Seasoned Marriages 

SW 851 Policy Analysis Research for Social 

Reform 

SW 854 Behavioral and Political Dynamics of 

Poverty 

SW 859 Practice Evaluation 

Field Instruction 

Social work graduate education requires that stu- 
dents complete two field practica in affiliated 
agencies/organizations under qualified field in- 
structors. Field placements offer students oppor- 
tunities to become involved in hands on experi- 
ence; to learn agency functions and policy; to be- 
come familiar with community resources; to ap- 
ply theory to practice; and to develop a profes- 
sional social work identity. Placements are in 
public and private social agencies, clinics, hospi- 
tals, schools and prisons, community, social and 
health planning agencies, and in selected occupa- 
tional settings. Field offerings include the follow- 
ing: 

SW 900 Field Practicum Lab 
SW 901-902/907-908 Field Instruction I-II 
SW 903-904 CSW Field Instruction HI-IV 

SW 905/909 Summer Block Field Instruction 
I-II 

SW 914-916 Community Organization, Social 
Planning and Policy Field Instruction III-TV 
SW 919-920 Human Services Administration 
Field Instruction III-TV 7 

Clinical Social Work 

Clinical Social Work is an orderly process of 
working with individuals and families to help 
them in dealing with personal, interpersonal and 
environmental difficulties. The process includes 
an exploration and understanding of the person 
and the nature of his/her difficulties and the pur- 
poseful use of a variety of interventive skills de- 
signed to reduce the difficulties and to increase 
the individual's capacity for adequate social func- 
tioning. 

The curriculum is arranged so that the student 
acquires a foundation in the generic aspects of 
clinical social work and is afforded an opportunity 



Graduate School of Social Work • Joint Degree Programs • 121 



to expand his/her knowledge and skill through the 

selection of electives that are related to specific 

aspects of practice. 

The course offerings are as follows: 

SW 762 Basic Skills in Therapeutic 

Intervention 

SW 860 Advanced Couples and Family 
Therapy: Theory, Evaluation and Practice 

SW 861 Differential Assessment and 

Intervention 

SW 863 Cross-Cultural Social Work 

SW 864 Group Therapy 

SW 865 Family Therapy I 

SW 866 Therapeutic Interventions with the 

Elderly 

SW 867 Clinical Social Work Treatment of 

Children and Adolescents 

SW 868 Integrative Seminar in Clinical Social 

Work 

SW 869 Clinical Social Work Independent 

Study 

SW 870 Clinical Social Work Group/ 
Independent Study: Family Preservation 

SW 871 Social Work in an Extremely Stressful 

Environment: The Prison 

SW 873 Psychosocial Dimensions of Health 

and Medical Care Practice 

SW 874 Adult Psychological Trauma: 

Assessment and Treatment 

SW 875 Family Therapy II 

SW 876 Time-Effective Therapy 

SW 878 Adolescent Mental Health Treatment 

SW 879 Social Work Practice with Women 

Social Planning and Administration 

Emphasizing disciplined inquiry, theoretical and 
skill-based knowledge for practice, and commit- 
ment to social justice, the Concentration in So- 
cial Planning and Administration prepares stu- 
dents for leadership roles in human services. The 
program seeks to attract students capable of mak- 
ing important contributions over their profes- 
sional careers to human services and other social 
interventions that enhance individual, family, and 
societal well-being. More particularly, this area of 
the curriculum is designed to provide students 
with the knowledge and skills necessary for 

• planning, implementing and managing human 
services; 

• using participatory strategies that involve indi- 
viduals, groups and organizations in planned 
development processes; 

• providing executive leadership that is both cre- 
ative and practical for private and public human 
service agencies; 

• advancing social policy that enhances the well- 
being of individuals, families, communities and 
society, with special regard for the needs of low- 
income and otherwise vulnerable populations; 

• researching, analyzing, and evaluating policies 
and programs. 

Students may choose one of two tracks within the 
concentration, either Community Organiza- 
tion, Social Planning and Policy (COSPP), or 
Human Services Administration. COSPP pre- 
pares social workers for staff and leadership roles 
in advocacy, community development, policy 



development, social planning and policy analysis. 
The Administration track prepares managers 
committed to social work goals and skilled in tech- 
niques of human services management. By group- 
ing electives, students in either track may also 
subconcentrate in a field of practice. 

The Concentration builds on the School's 
foundation courses with a joint methods course 
and first year field curriculum designed for all stu- 
dents in both the COSPP and Administration 
tracks. In addition, each track includes two ad- 
vanced methods courses, a human behavior/social 
environment corollary, and a second year meth- 
ods-specific field practicum, as well as supplemen- 
tary electives. 
Course offerings are as follows: 

SW 790 Social Work in Industry 

SW 800 Basic Skills in SPA Interventions 

S W 809 Administration of Human Services 

Programs 

SW 810 Seminar in Administration and 

Financial Management 

SW 816 Supervision and Staff Management 

SW 883 Social Planning in the Community 

SW 884 Strategic Planning 

SW 887 Developmental Planning: Urban 

SW 888 Seminar in Community Organization 
and Political Strategy 

SW 897 Planning for Health and Mental 
Health Services 

SW 899 SPA Independent Study 

JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Graduate School of Social Work has insti- 
tuted three joint degree programs with other 
graduate units of Boston College. Particulars on 
each are available from the respective Admission 
Offices, and candidates must apply to and be ac- 
cepted by each of the relevant schools indepen- 
dently. 

The M.S.W./M.B.A. Program, in cooperation 
with the Carroll Graduate School of Manage- 
ment, involves three full-time years, one each in 
the foundation years of both schools, and the third 
incorporating joint class and field work. 

The four-year M.S.W./f.D. Program, inaugu- 
rated in 1988 with Boston College Law School, 
requires a foundation year in each school followed 
by two years of joint class and field instruction 
with selected emphasis on such areas as family law 
and services; child welfare and advocacy; socio- 
legal aspects and interventions relating to poverty, 
homelessness, immigration, etc. 

The three-year M.S.W./M.A. (Pastoral Min- 
istry) in conjunction with the Boston College 
Institute for Religious Education and Pastoral 
Ministry was begun in 1989 and consists of a foun- 
dation year in each curriculum with a third year 
of jointly administered class and field instruction. 
Areas of focus include clinical work in hospitals 
and prisons, organizational services/administra- 
tion, and parish social ministry. 

Accelerated B.A./M.S.W. Program 

hi cooperation with the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, the School has instituted a Three/Two 
Program whereby a limited number of Psychol- 
ogy and Sociology Majors may combine first-year 



Graduate Social Work courses and field work 
with their junior and senior studies, receive the 
B.A. at the end of four years, and then enroll for- 
mally for the final year of the M.S.W. Program. 
For sophomore prerequisites and application in- 
formation, undergraduates should call the Gradu- 
ate School of Social Work Director of Admis- 
sions, Ext. 4024. 

The School also offers an upper-division in- 
troductory course that is not applicable to the 
M.S.W. degree: SW 600 Introduction to Social 
Work is cross-listed with the Departments of 
Psychology and Sociology, in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM: DOCTORAL 
LEVEL 

The Doctor of Social Work program for M.S.W. 
practitioners who have demonstrated competence 
in a practice method is designed to (1) extend the 
student's conceptual and empirical knowledge 
about clinical or social policy analysis and plan- 
ning methods of social work practice that are re- 
sponsive to people in need of services; and (2) in- 
tegrate the student's research competencies with 
clinical or planning competencies in order to de- 
velop social workers with the capacity for formu- 
lating and implementing systematic studies of 
professional practice. 

Six core courses, four specialization courses 
(clinical or planning), four electives and nine dis- 
sertation related credits, comprise the 5 1 credits 
required for the D.S.W. The program, instituted 
in 1979, is designed for part time study. Courses 
offered to date include the following: 
SW 960 Public Policy as a Field 
SW 962 Social Policy Analysis 
SW 963 Scientific Inquiry in Social Work 

SW 964 Statistical Analysis for Social Work 
Research 

SW 965 Evaluation of Outcomes in Clinical 

Practice 

SW 966 Dissertation Seminar 

SW971 Doctoral Seminar in Clinical Practice I 

SW 972 Empirical Clinical Practice 

SW 973 Comparative Models of 

Intervention 

SW 974 Issues in Clinical Social Work 

Practice 

SW 976 Ego Psychology and Clinical Practice 

SW 978 Ethnicity, Race, Gender & Class: 

Theory, Models and Research in Clinical 

Practice 

SW 980 Social Planning Theory 

SW981 Social Planning Models: Congruence 

and Evaluation 

SW 982 Participatory Dynamics of Social 

Planning 

SW983 Planning for Specific Intervention 

Domains I 

SW 984 Planning for Specific Intervention 

Domains II 

SW 992 Correlation and Regression 

UN 880 Psychoanalytic Psychiatry: Issues in the 
Theory of Technique 



122 • Social Work • Continuing Education 



Independent Studies, Tutorials, Teaching Labs, 
Dissertation Direction, and Professional Work- 
shops by arrangement 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

The Office of Continuing Education offers work- 
shops, seminars, institutes and mini-courses in a 
wide variety of subject areas for human services 
professionals. Continuing Education credits as- 
sociated with these offerings are applicable to 
Massachusetts Social Work Licensing require- 
ments. Advanced training certificate programs are 
also available. 

Information 

For a more detailed description of course offer- 
ings, the applicant should consult the Boston Col- 
lege Graduate School of Social Work Bulletin 
that may be obtained by writing to the Director 
of Admissions, Boston College Graduate School 
of Social Work, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 
02167. 

FACULTY 

June Gary Hopps, Professor and Dean; A.B., 
Spelman College; M.S.W., Atlanta University; 
Ph.D., The Florence Heller School for Advanced 
Studies in Social Welfare, Brandeis University 

Demetrius S. Iatridis, Professor; A.B., 
Washington Jefferson College; M.S., University 
of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 

Richard A. Mackey, Professor; A.B., Merrimack 
College; M.S.W., D.S.W., Catholic University 
of America 

Anthony N. Maluccio, Professor; Chairperson, 
D.S.W. Program; B.A., Yale University; M.S., 
D.S.W., Columbia University 

Elaine Pinderhughes, Professor, Chairperson, 
Clinical Social Work; A.B., Howard University; 
M.S.W., Columbia University 

Robert L. Castagnola, Associate Professor;B.S. S.S., 
Boston College; M.S.W., Boston College 
Graduate School of Social Work 

Woo Sik Chung, Associate Professor, B.A., Sogang 
University; M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis University 

Albert F. Hanwell, Associate Professor and Associate 
Dean; B.S., Boston College; M.S.W., Boston 
College Graduate School of Social Work 

Karen K Kayser, Associate Professor; B.A., 
Michigan State University; M.S.W., Ph.D., 
University of Michigan 

Eric R. Kingson, Associate Professor; Chairperson 
of Social Planning and Administration; B.A., 
Boston University; M.P.A., Northeastern 
University; Ph.D., Brandeis University, The 
Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in 
Social Welfare 

Thanh Van Tran, Associate Professor; B.A., 
University of Texas; M.A., Jackson State 
University; M.S.W., Ph.D., University of Texas 



Nancy W. Ve ede r, Associate Professor; A. B . , S mi th 
College; M.S., Simmons College School of Social 
Work; C.A.S., Smith College School of Social 
Work; Ph.D., The Florence Heller Graduate 
School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare, 
Brandeis University; M.B.A., Boston College 

Leon F. Williams, Associate Professor; Chairperson, 
Social Work Foundation; B.A., Ohio State Uni- 
versity; M.S.W., West Virginia University; Ph.D., 
Brandeis University 

Richard H. Rowland, Adjunct Associate Professor; 
B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S.W. Boston 
University School of Social Work; Ph.D., The 
Florence Heller School, Brandeis University 

Paul Wilson, Adjunct Associate Professor; B.A., 
Acadia University; M.Div., Union Theological 
Seminary, New York; M.S.W., Ph.D., 
Washington University, Missouri 

Pauline Collins, Assistant Dean for Field Education 
and Assistant Professor; B.A., University of 
Michigan-Dearborn; M.S.W., Ph.D., University 
of Michigan School of Social Work 

Paul Kline, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., St. 
Bonaventure University; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Regina O'Grady-LeShane, Assistant Professor; 
A.B., Caldwell College for Women; M.A., New 
School for Social Research; Ph.D., Brandeis 
University 

Thomas O'Hare, Assistant Professor; B.A. 
Manhattan College; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers 
University 



Summer Session • 123 



Summer Session 



With its wide range of accredited courses and 
special programs, Boston College Summer Ses- 
sion answers the educational needs of a broad 
spectrum of students at every level — those already 
in degree programs, at Boston College and at 
other institutions, but also academic and business 
professionals seeking to expand their capacity to 
meet the challenges in their specialized fields. 

The convenient suburban setting and exten- 
sive facilities for housing and recreation place 
Boston College Summer Session in a unique po- 
sition to provide the student with an ideal envi- 
ronment for summer study. Although the student 
body is highly diversified, all intermingle success- 
fully, enjoying a relaxed and enthusiastic faculty, 
smaller classes, and the summertime beauty of the 
campus. 

The summer program takes place within two 
intensive six-week periods beginning in early May 



in which credits earned per course are equivalent 
to one semester of the regular academic year. 

Admission 

Under a policy of open registration, Boston Col- 
lege Summer Session welcomes all students, and 
no academic records need be submitted. How- 
ever, because formal application is not required, 
students should not confuse registration in the 
summer with admission to regular University 
standing, either in graduate or undergraduate 
programs. 

As in the case with the rest of the University, 
Boston College Summer Session is coeducational 
and admits students of any race, creed, color, 
handicap, and national or ethnic origin. 

Graduate Students 

Visiting graduate students should possess a 
Bachelor's degree and are welcome to register for 



summer courses provided they observe any appli- 
cable course restrictions where they appear. 
Boston College graduate students in degree pro- 
grams should consult with their advisors before 
registering to make sure their summer course se- 
lections are consistent with their degree require- 
ments. 

INFORMATION 

For information about the courses and special 
programs offered during the Summer, request a 
Summer Session Catalog from the Summer Ses- 
sion Office, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, 
Massachusetts 02167. 



124 • Campus Map 



Campus Map 



Boston College 

chestnut hux campus 




Boston College 




Administration • 125 



Administration 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Geoffrey T. Boisi, Chairman 

Richard F. Syron, Vke-Cbairman 

Joseph A. Appleyard, S.J. 

Wayne A. Budd 

James F. Geary 

William F. Connell 

John M. Connors 

John M. Corcoran 

Brian E. Daley, S.J. 

Michael A. Fahey, SJ. 

John F. Farrell, Jr. 

Charles D. Ferris 

Thomas J. Flatley 

Samuel J. Gerson 

Susan M. Gianinno 

Mary J. Steele Guilfoile 

Richard T. Horan 

Michael D. Jones 

Judith B. Krauss 

Michael J. Lavelle, S.J. 

Peter S. Lynch 

Catherine T. McNamee, C.S.J. 

John A. McNeice, Jr. 

J. Donald Monan, S.J. 

Robert J. Morrissey 

Robert J. Murray 

R. Michael Murray, Jr. 

David S. Nelson 

Kevin G. O'Connell, S.J. 

Edward M. O'Flaherty, SJ. 

Thomas P. O'Neill, m 

Nicholas S. Rashford, SJ. 

Walter R. Rossi 

Warren B. Rudman 

Nicholas A. Sannella 

John J. Shea, SJ. 

Marianne D. Short 

Sylvia Q. Simmons 

Sandra J. Thomson 

Salvatore J. Trani 

Thomas A. Vanderslice 

Mary Jane Voute' 

Vincent A. Wasik 



The Corporate Title of Boston College is 
Trustees of Boston College 



THE OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Rev. J. Donald Monan, S.J., Ph.D., 
University of Louvain 
President 

Mary Lou DeLong, B.A. Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart 
Vice President, University Relations 

John T. Driscoll, B.S., Boston College 
Vice President for Administration 

Rev. Joseph P. Duffy, S.J., Ph.D., Fordham 
University 
University Secretary 

Kevin P. Duffy, Ph.D., Boston College 
Vice President for Student Affairs 

Margaret A. Dwyer, M.Ed., Boston College 
Vice President and Assistant to the President 

James P. Mclntyre, Ed.D., Boston College 
Senior Vice President 

Peter C. McKenzie, M.B.A., Babson College 
Vice President, Finance and Business Affairs and 
Treasurer 

Rev. William B. Neenan, S.J., Ph.D., 

University of Michigan 
Academic Vice President and Dean of Faculties 

Leo V. Sullivan, M.Ed., Boston College 
Vice President, Human Resources 

CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICERS 

Rev. J. Robert Barth, S.J., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 
Dean, The College of Arts and Sciences 

Mary J. Cronin, Ph.D., Harvard University 
University Librarian 

June G. Hopps, Ph.D., Brandeis University 
Dean, The Graduate School of Social Work 

Robert S. Lay, M.S., University of Wisconsin 
at Madison 
Dean of Enrollment Management 

Barbara H. Munro, Ph.D., University of 
Connecticut 
Dean, The School of Nursing 

John J. Neuhauser, Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute 
Dean, The Carroll School of Management 

Gerald J. Pine, Ed.D., Boston University 
Dean, The School of Education 

Aviam Soifer, J.D., Yale University 
Dean, The Law School 

Donald J. White, Ph.D., Harvard University 
Dean, The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; 
Associate Dean of Faculties 

Rev. James A. Woods, S.J., Ed.D., Boston 

University 
Dean, The Evening College of Arts, Sciences and 
Business Administration; Dean, The Summer 
Session 



ASSISTANT AND ASSOCIATE DEANS 

Mary Brabeck, Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota 
Associate Dean, The School of Education 

John J. Burns, Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Dean, The College of Arts and Sciences 

Louis S. Corsini, Ph.D., Louisiana State 
Associate Dean, The Carroll Graduate School of 
Management 

Patricia DeLeeuw, Ph.D., University of 
Toronto 

Associate Dean, The Graduate School of Arts and 

Sciences 

R. Lisa DiLuna, J.D., Boston College 
Assistant Dean for Students, The Law School 

Sr. Maryalyce Gilfeather, O.P., M.Ed., 
Boston College 

Acting Assistant Dean for Students, The School of 

Education 

Carol H. Green, Ph.D., George Washington 
University 
Associate Dean, The College of Arts and Sciences 

Albert F. Hanwell, M.S.W., Boston College 
Associate Dean, The Graduate School of Social 
Work 

Katharine Hastings, A.M., Harvard 
University 

Assistant to Academic Vice President and Dean of 

Faculties 

Loretta Higgins, Ed.D., Boston College 
Associate Dean, The School of Nursing 

Richard Keeley, M.A., Boston College 
Assistant Dean, The Carroll School of 
Management 

Brian P. Lutch, J.D., Boston University 
Associate Dean, The Law School 

Nancy McCarthy, Ed.D., Boston University 
Associate Dean, The School of Nursing 

Marie McHugh, Ph.D., Harvard University 
Senior Associate Dean, The College of Arts and 
Sciences 

Judith A. McMorrow, J.D., University of 
Notre Dame Law School 
Associate Dean, The Law School 

Robert R Newton, Ed.D., Harvard 
University 
Associate Academic Vice President 

Sr. Mary Daniel O'Keeffe, O.P., Ph.D., 
Boston College 
Associate Dean, The College of Arts and Sciences 

Richard A. Spinello, Ph.D., Fordham 
University 
Associate Dean of Faculties 



126 • Administration 



DIRECTORS IN ACADEMIC AREA 

Rev. Joseph A. Appleyard, S.J., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 
Director of Arts and Sciences Honors Program 

Philip Bantin, M.L.S., University of 

Wisconsin 
University A rchivist 

Albert Beaton, Ed.D., Harvard University 

Director, The Center for the Study of Testing 
Evaluation, and Educational Policy 

Rev. Stanley J. Bezuszka, S.J., Ph.D., Brown 
University 

Director of Mathematics Institute 

Robert Bloom, J. D., Boston College 
Director of Urban Legal Laboratory 

Louise M. Clark, B.S., Boston University 
Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, The 
Law School 

Ann Marie Delaney, Ph.D., Boston College 
Director, Prog-am Research, The School of 
Education 

Cathy Dernoncourt, B.A., University of 
Mississippi 
Director of Alumni Relations, The Law School 

Philip A. DiMattia, Ph.D., Boston College 
Director of Campus School 

Rev. Charles F. Donovan, S.J., Ph.D., Yale 
University 
University Historian 

James F. Flagg, Ph.D., Boston University 
Director of Graduate Fellowships and Foreign 
Study 

Louise M. Lonabocker, Ph.D., Boston 
College 

Associate Dean, Enrollment Management and 

University Registrar 

Vincent J. Lynch, D.S.W., Boston College 
Director of Continuing Education, The Graduate 
School of Social Work 

John L. Mahoney, Jr., M.A.T., Boston 
College 
Director of Admission 

John McKiernan, M.B.A., Boston College 
Director of Management Institute 

Ronald F. Peracchio, M.B.A., Boston College 
Director of Career Planning, The Carroll 
Graduate School of Management 

Leo F. Power, Jr., M.B.A., Boston College 
Director of Institute for Space Research 

Matthew Mullane, Ph.D., (Cand), Boston 
College 
Director of Faith, Peace, and Justice Program 

Marian St. Onge, Ph.D., Boston College 
Director of International Programs 

Yoshio Saito, MA., Emerson College 

Director of University Audio- Visual Services 

Paul G. Schervish, Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, Madison 

Director of Social Welfare Regional Research 

Institute 



VV. Jean Weyman, M.S., Indiana University 
School of Nursing 

Director of Continuing Education,The School of 

Nursing 

DIRECTORS IN UNIVERSITY AREA 

Thomas A. Angelo, Ed.D. 

Director, Academic Development Center 

John D. Beckwith, A.B. 

Director of Purchasing 

Ben Birnbaum, M.Ed. 
Director of Publications and Print Marketing 

Donald Brown, Ph.D. 

Director ofAHANA Student Programs 

Dan Bunch, M.S.W. 

Director, Learning to Learn 

Edmund M. Burke, Ph. D. 

Director, The Center for Corporate Community 
Relations 

Michael T. Callnan, Ph.D. (cand.) 
Director of Budgets 

Robert F. Capalbo, Ph.D. 

Director of Housing 

William E. Chadwick, A.B., C.P.A. 
Director of Internal Audit 

Richard Cleary, S.J., M.A, S.T.L. 
University Chaplin 

Michael Cunningham 

Director of Dining Services 

Ivy Dodge, M.A. 

Director of University Policies and Procedures 

Michael J. Driscoll, M.B.A. 

Controller 

John Ebel, Ph.D. 

Director, Weston Observatory 

Howard Enoch, Ph.D. 

Director of Robsham Theater Arts Center 

Stephen Erickson, Ph.D. 

Director of University Research 

Rod Feak, M.S. 

Director of Computing Center 

William J. Fleming, Ph.D. 
Director of Information Processing Support 

Chet Gladchuk, M.S. 

Director of Athletics 

Bernard W. Gleason, Jr., MBA. 

Executive Director of Information Technology 

Paul P. Haran, Ph.D. 

Associate Treasurer 

J.Joseph Harrington, A.B. 

Director of Management Information Services 

Clayton Jeffers, A.B. 

Director of Network Services 

Richard Jefferson, J. D. 
Director, Employee Relations 

Alice Jeghelian, Ph.D. 

Director of Professional Development 



Claire Lowrey, Ph.D. 

Acting Director, Institute for Religious 
Education and Pastoral Ministry 

Marianne Lord, M.A. 

Director, Law School Development and Special 
Assistant to the Dean 

Kevin M. Lyons, Ed.D. 

Director of Learning Resources for 
Student Athletes 

Barbara Marshall, Ed.D. 

Director of Affirmative Action 

Arnold F. Mazur, M.D. 

Director of Health Services 

Thomas P. McGuinness, Ph.D. 

Director, University Counseling Services 

Jean S. McKeigue, M.B.A. 

Director of Community Affairs 

Marilyn S. Morgan, M.Ed. 
Director of Career Center 

Sharon Hamby O'Connor, J.D. 

Law Librarian 

Alfred G. Pennino, B.S. 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 

Michael Prinn, B.S.B.A. 

Director of Risk Management and 
Insurance 

Robert Sherwood, M.S. 

Dean for Student Development 

Randy Stabile, J.D., M.B.A. 

Director of Development for Administra- 
tion and Annual Giving 

John F. Wissler, M.B.A. 

Executive Director of Alumni Association 

Rev. Dennis Yesalonia, S.J., J.D. 

Legal Counsel, University Affairs 



Academic Calendar • 127 



Academic Calendar 1994-95 



First Semester 



August 29 



August 3 1 



Second Semester 



December 9 
to 
December 12 

December 1 3 
to 
December 20 



Monday 



Wednesday 



September 5 Monday 

September 6 Tuesday 

September 12 Monday 



September 7 


Wednesday 


September 13 


Tuesday 


October 10 


Monday 


November 9 


Wednesday 


November 10 


Thursday 


to 




November 30 


Wednesday 


November 22 


Tuesday 


November 23 


Wednesday 


to 




November 25 


Friday 


November 28 


Monday 


December 8 


Thursday 



Friday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Tuesday 



Classes begin for second and third 
year law students 

Classes begin for first year law 
students 

Last date for students in Graduate 
School of Management to register 

Labor Day 

Classes begin 

Drop/Add period for undergraduates 
continues through September 12 



Faculty Convocation 

Last date for all Graduate students ex- 
cept Graduate School of Management 
students to register 

Columbus Day — no classes 

Last date for undergraduates to file 
change-of -major forms 

Undergraduate registration period for 
spring 1995 



Last date for graduate students to sign 
up for December 1994 graduation 

Thanksgiving holidays 



Last date for official withdrawal from 
a course or from the University 

Last date for Master's and Doctoral 
candidates to turn in signed and ap- 
proved copies of theses and disserta- 
tions for December graduation 

Study days-no classes for undergradu- 
ates (graduate courses may meet) 



Term examinations 



January 9 
January 1 1 

January 16 
January 17 
January 23 

January 25 

February 1 5 



Monday 
Wednesday 

Monday 
Tuesday 
Monday 

Wednesday 

Wednesday 



Classes begin for all law students 

Last date for students in Graduate 
School of Management to register 

Martin Luther King Day 

Classes begin 

Drop/Add period for undergraduates 
continues through January 23 



Last date for all Graduate students ex- 
cept Graduate School of Management 
students to register 

Last date for graduate students to sign 
up for May 1995 graduation 



February 20 


Monday 


Washington's Birthday-no classes 


March 6 


Monday 


Spring Vacation 


March 10 


Friday 




March 29 


Wednesday 


Last date for undergraduates to file 
change-of-major forms 


March 30 
to 
April 12 


Thursday 
Wednesday 


Undergraduate registration period for 
fall 1995 


April 12 


Wednesday 


Last date for Master's and Doctoral 



candidates to turn in signed and 
approved copies of theses and 
dissertations for May graduation 



April 13 


Thursday 


Easter Weekend 


April 14 


Friday 




April 17 


Monday 


Patriot's Day-no classes 


April 18 


Tuesday 


Last date for withdrawal from class or 
from the University 


May 4 
to 
May 5 


Thursday 
Friday 


Study days-no classes for undergradu- 
ates (graduate classes may meet) 


May 6 


Saturday 


Term Examinations 


IX) 

May 13 


Saturday 




May 22 


Monday 


Commencement 


May 28 


Sunday 


Law School Commencement 



128 • Directory and Office Locations 



Directory and Office Locations 



Academic Development Center 

Thomas A. Angelo, Director O'Neill Library 

Accounting 
Jeffrey R. Cohen, Chairperson Service Building, 2 1 

AHANA 
Donald Brown, Director 72 College Road 

American Studies 
Christopher Wilson, Director Carney Hall 

Arts and Sciences 

J. Robert Barth, S.J., Dean Gasson 103 

J.Joseph Burns, Assoc. Dean Gasson 109 

Carol Hurd Green, Assoc. Dean Gasson 109 

Marie McHugh, Senior Assoc. Dean Gasson 109 

Sr. Mary Daniel O'Keeffe, Assoc. Dean Gasson 109 

Biology 

William Petri, Chairperson Higgins 32 1 

Black Studies 

Frank Taylor, Director Lyons 301 

Business Law 

David Tvvomey, Chairperson St. Clement's, 4th Floor 

Career Center 

Marilyn Morgan, Director 38 Southwell Hall 

Center for East Europe, Russia and Asia 

Raymond McNally, Director Carney 171 

Chemistry 

Evan Kantrowitz, Chairperson Merkert 125D 

Classical Studies 

Charles Afiearn, Jr., Chairperson Carney 124 

Communication 

James Willis, Chairperson Lyons 2 14B 

Computer Science 

Michael McFarland, S.J., Chairperson Service Building, B2A 

Counseling Services 

Campion Hall Unit Campion 301 

Gasson Hall Unit Gasson 108 

Economics 

Joseph Quinn, Chairperson Carney 131 

Education 

Diana Pullin, Dean Campion 101 A 

Mary Brabeck, Associate Dean Campion 308 

Sr. MaryAlyce Gitfeather Assistant Dean Campion 104A 

Arline Riordan, Admission Campion 103 

Curriculum, Administration, SPED 

John F. Savage, Chairperson Campion 210 

Education: Counseling, Developmental Psychology, Research 
Methods 

Mary Walsh, Chairperson Campion 308 

English 

Judith Wilt, Chairperson Carney 450 

Evening College 

James Woods, S.J., Dean McGuinn 100 

Finance 

Robert Taggart, Chairperson Service Building, 21 IE 

Financial Aid 

Mary McGranahan, Acting Director Lyons 120 

Fine Arts 

John Steczynski, Chairperson Devlin 434A 

Geology & Geophysics 

David C. Roy, Chairperson Devlin 215 

Germanic Studies 

Michael Resler, (Chairperson Carney 325 

Graduate Arts & Sciences 

Donald White, Dean McGuinn 221 

Patricia DeLeeuw, Associate Dean 



History Department 

James Cronin, Chairperson Carney 116 

Housing 

Robert Capalbo, Director Rubenstein Hall 

Law School 

Aviam Soifer, Dean Stuart M309 

Learning Resources for Student Athletes 

Kevin Lyons, Director Lyons 405 

Library Reference Department 

Kwasi Sarkodie-Mensah, Head Reference Librarian O'Neill Library 

Management 

John Neuhauser, Dean Lyons 1 16E 

Louis Corsini, Graduate Assoc. Dean Lyons 210A 

Christine O'Brien, Associate Dean Lyons 210B 

Marketing Department 

Michael Peters, Chairperson St. Clement's 3rd Floor 

Mathematics Department 

William Keane, Chairperson Carney 315 

Music Department 

T. Frank Kennedy, S.J., Chairperson Lyons 407 

Nursing 

Barbara Hazard Munro, Dean Cushing 203 

Nancy McCarthy, Graduate Associate Dean Cushing 203 

Loretta Higgins, Undergraduate Associate Dean Cushing 203 

Operations and Strategic Management 

Jeffrey Ringuest, Chairperson St. Clement's 4th Floor 

Organization Studies 

Jean Bartunek, Chairperson St. Clement's 302 

Philosophy 

Richard Cobb-Stevens, Chairperson Carney 272 

Physics 

Rein Uritam, Chairperson Higgins 355 

Political Science 

Dennis Hale, Chairperson McGuinn 219 

Psychology 

M.Jeanne Sholl, Chairperson McGuinn 429 

Norman Berkowitz, Assistant Chairperson 

Religious Education Program (IREPM) 

Claire E. Lowrey, Director 31 Lawrence Ave. 

Romance Languages 

Matilda Bruckner, Chairperson Lyons 304 

Slavic & Eastern Languages 

Michael Connolly, Chairperson Carney 238 

Social Work, Graduate School 

June Hopps, Dean McGuinn 132 

Sociology Department 

Sharlene Hesse-Biber, Chairperson McGuinn 417 

Student Accounts and Loans 

Kathy Mundhenk, Associate Controller More 380 

John Brown, Collection Manager More 380 

Student Development 

Robert Sherwood, Dean McElroy 233 

Summer Session 

James Woods, S.J., Dean McGuinn 100 

Theater 

Stuart J. Hecht, Chairperson Robsham Theater 

Theology 

Donald Dietrich, Chairperson Carney 418 

University Registrar 

Louise Lonabocker Lyons 101 



n College 
USPS-389-750 
Office of the University Registrar 
140 Commonwealth Avenue 
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167-3804 



Second Class 
Postage Paid 
Boston, MA 02109